Ethnic Recipe

ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 6

Posted on September 23, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Cakes, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Oranges, Paerve, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, U.S. Politics, U.S. PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 2012 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |


PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 2012

While I was surfing and trying to think what I wanted to write about today I Stumbled! across an interesting article about Rick Perry entitled “Rick Perry Should Terrify Anyone With a Uterus” which was written by Kim Conte on September 21, 2011 and was posted at The Stir’s Cafemom. To read the entire article here is the link:
http://thestir.cafemom.com/in_the_news/126315/rick_perry_should_terrify_anyone

The more I learn about Rick Perry, the more afraid I become. If this man manages to become the Republican candidate for the 2012 Presidential Election, run to Canada or any other country, especially if you are middle class or poor. Run if you are just an average man or woman. Why am I saying this? Well, according to what I’ve read about Texas’ problems, especially in health care, I cringe. In my humble opinion, we have had enough of Texans in the Oval Office already. Look at the damage they did to health care. In New York State we have decent health care, although I complain about the costs as does everyone else. But at least we have the ability to get health insurance! If Perry gets elected, according to the above article, all health care will suffer, especially women’s health care. Why should we risk having the same troubles as Texas has? Ms. Conte states in her article that “…This year Perry and the Texas legislature cut funding for women’s health clinics by two-thirds. They said it’s to save money; but there’s no denying that Perry’s and other conservatives’ pro-life, anti-birth control agenda was a major factor in the decision. (In another post we can discuss the irony of Texas spending more than any other state on teen pregnancy.) Even if their primary goal was just to cut funding for family planning, they managed to put women’s health overall in jeopardy.” Don’t we want better for our country? For ourselves?

As a grandmother of an almost 16 year old young lady, I was appalled when I found out about Perry’s stand on the HPV vaccine issue. “The debate about Rick Perry and the HPV vaccine is a battle for the very soul of the Republican Party. Right now, Rick Perry is parading around the country talking about how “conservative” he is, but would a real conservative attempt to forcibly vaccinate 12 year old girls for a sexually transmitted disease? If Rick Perry really wants government to be as “inconsequential” in our lives as possible, then why did he issue an executive order that mandated that 12 year old girls in the state of Texas be injected with a highly controversial vaccine? Rick Perry did not even consult the Texas legislature and he spat right in the face of parental rights when he did this.” (This quote was found in an article at http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/category/politics.)

In an article entitled, “14 Reasons Why Rick Perry Would Be A Really, Really Bad President,” we are informed that “If Rick Perry becomes president, he will probably be very similar to George W. Bush. He will explode the size of the U.S. government and U.S. government debt, he will find sneaky ways to raise taxes, he will do nothing about the Federal Reserve or corruption in our financial system and he will push the agenda of the globalists at every turn.” Do we really want another 4-8 years of another George Bush? I know I don’t. (You can read this article at http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/14-reasons-why-rick-perry-would-be-a-really-really-bad-president.)

At the website 2012 The Presidential Candidates, I read that Mitt Romney blasted Perry In last night’s Republican Candidates, “ Debate Rick Perry doubled down on his outrageous far right wing statements about Social Security and Mitt Romney hit him hard on it. Are the Republicans really going to nominate a guy who calls Social Security a “ponzi scheme”?

And no Social Security is nothing at all like a “ponzi scheme”. The idea is absurd. Social Security has been working for Americans for over 70 years and it will be around for as long as we keep people like Rick Perry out of a position to destroy it.”

I know one thing for sure about the upcoming presidential election. I will not be voting for Rick Perry.
Ok, now on to better things like Honey Cake!

DATES

APRICOT PRESERVES

Honey Cake W/Fruit I (P, Tnt)
=============================
Source: Noreen Gilletz
Poster: Faygie
Serves: 12 to 16

1 stick margarine
3 eggs
2 teaspoons baking soda
3 cups flour
1 cup sugar
1 cup orange juice
1 cup honey
1/2 cup apricot jam
1 medium apple grated
1/2 cup each chopped nuts and chopped dates

Mix together in large mixer bowl the margarine and eggs. Add the baking soda, flour, sugar mixed together. Add the orange juice; mix on slow.

Add honey. Stir in jam, apple, nuts, and dates.

Bake in a lightly greased bundt pan at 350°F for 1 hour. Turn out of
pan immediately.

Faygie’s Notes: This is my holiday staple which includes apples and
honey for a sweet year. Norene Gilletz figured out the calorie content, but we decided that the cake was too good to worry about calories–once a year. Hope you enjoy it.

Nutritional Info Per Serving: 1/12 of cake: 265 calories, 35g
carbohydrate, 1g fibre and 13.3g fat, 35mg cholesterol; 1/16 of cake:
199 calories, 26g carbohydrate, 10g fat and 27mg cholesterol

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 7

Posted on September 22, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Cakes, Chocolate, Cookies, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Family, Honey, Hope, Jewish, Jewish Prayers & Blessings, Kosher Recipe, Meat, Menu, Oranges, Paerve, Parve, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, Side Dish, Traditions, Vegetables | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Sorry I didn’t have time to write a commentary today…lucky you! I just had time to put together this continuation of yesterday’s post as my husband has been in the hospital and was just released today. So here are the recipes I will be using this year for brisket, green beans, potato kugel, a sweet tzimmes and cocoa honey cake. Also included here are links for rugelach and honey-almond cookies recipes. At the end you will find the blessings for the holiday meals.

This year I want to try a different recipe for brisket. This is the one I have chosen. I found it at http://www.bonappetit.com.

A TRUE ROYAL FEAST--SPICED BRISKET WITH LEEKS AND DRIED APRICOTS

Spiced Brisket With Leeks And Dried Apricots
============================================
You’ll need to start marinating the meat at least a day ahead. It can be cooked up to two days before serving.

Makes 8 servings

Recipe by Rabbi Miriyam Glazer and Phyllis Glazer
Photograph by Maren Caruso
April 2006
Http://www.bonappetit.com

Ingredients:

2-1/2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons coarse kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 tablespoon ground nutmeg
1 4 1/2- to 5 1/2 pound flat-cut (first-cut) brisket, well-trimmed
2 medium leeks (white and pale green parts only), sliced
1 medium onion, chopped
24 whole dried apricots, divided
10 garlic cloves, peeled
6 sprigs fresh thyme
2 bay leaves
2 cups dry red wine
1 tablespoon matzo cake meal
Chopped fresh cilantro

Preparation:

Stir first 8 ingredients in small bowl.

Arrange brisket in large roasting pan; spread spice mixture evenly over both sides. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Preheat broiler. Uncover brisket. Broil until brown, about 5 minutes
per side.

Turn brisket fat side up in pan. Set oven temperature to 325°F.
Sprinkle leeks, onion, 12 apricots, garlic, thyme, and bay leaves
around brisket. Pour wine over. Cover pan with heavy-duty foil and bake brisket until tender, about 2 1/2 hours.

Uncover; cool 1 1/2 hours. Transfer brisket to work surface. Pour
juices into large measuring cup. Spoon off fat, reserving 1 tablespoon.

Thinly slice brisket across grain on slight diagonal; overlap slices in 15x10x2-inch glass baking dish. Spoon 1 cup degreased pan juices over brisket. Stir reserved 1 tablespoon fat and matzo cake meal in medium saucepan over medium heat 3 minutes. Add remaining degreased pan juices and remaining 12 apricots. Simmer until sauce thickens and boils, stirring occasionally, about 3 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 days ahead.

Cover brisket and sauce separately and chill.

Rewarm covered brisket in 350°F oven 30 minutes or 45 minutes if
chilled.

Rewarm sauce over low heat.

Sprinkle brisket with cilantro and serve with sauce.

This next recipe is for my tried and true potato kugel recipe that was the way my Grandmother made it, with a few modernized methods! I can’t have enough of potato kugel or potato latkes. Either is fine with me, although if I had to choose, I’d choose the latkes. ~Marilyn aka Softa123

I CAN NEVER GET ENOUGH POTATO KUGEL. I COULD EAT THE WHOLE THING!

Softa123’s Grandmother’s Potato Kugel and Latkes
========================================
1 large Onion
4 large Potatoes
1 Egg
1 tablespoon Matzah Meal (or flour)
1 tablespoon Kosher Salt
1 drop of Oil
Pepper to taste

CATEGORIES: Side Dish, Passover, Yom Tov, Parties

Peel and quarter onion. Put into food processor. (Yes, I updated this ecipe just a bit!!) Peel and quarter potatoes. Process the potatoes with the onion with your steel blade till consistency of puree.

Continue till all potatoes are processed. Put potato-onion mixture into a strainer to drain off as much water as you can from it. Then, put the potato-onion mixture into a large bowl.

Beat the egg and add it to the potato-onion mixture. Also add 1
tablespoon of oil, and 1 HEAPING tablespoon Matzah Meal(or flour, if
not for Passover!)[Use a regular tablespoon, not a measuring tablespoon to measure the matzah meal.] Add Kosher Salt and pepper to taste. Mix all together. Pour into greased 9×13 inch pan and bake at 400 degrees for at least 1 hour. I like to bake longer because I like it really crusty!!

TO MAKE LATKES:

Follow directions above, but instead of putting into a pan and baking, heat 1/2 inch oil in a heavy frying pan and drop really
full large spoonfuls of batter into the oil and fry on one side until golden then turn over and fry on the other.

Line a plate with toweling or line a counter with a couple thicknesses of brown paper bags to drain the fried latkes on. Repeat till all of the batter is used.

I use vegetable oil or peanut oil to fry latkes in.

When making latkes you don’t need to add the extra drop of oil to
batter, but you do need it when making kugel.

Triple recipe for 12-18 people, small pieces.

I have never made a sweet tzimmes so I had to do some research. This recipe for a sweet tzimmes sounded interesting to me. I’m going to try it, so let’s hope it turns out for all of us!

This is about the right size dice for this tzimmes recipe.

Tzimmes
=======
By Leslie in Texas on April 10, 2003

Prep Time: 30 minsTotal Time: 1 hrs 15 mins

Servings: 6-8

“This is from the Houston Chronical’s food section entitled ” Feast at a Jewish Table”. The recipe was reprinted from The Hadassah Jewish Holiday Cookbook, a Compilation of fund raising cookbooks from Hadassah women around the country and Israel.” ~Leslie in Texas

Ingredients

2 medium carrots, coarsely diced
1 medium sweet potatoes or 1 medium yams, coarsely diced
1 large baking apples, seeded and coarsely diced
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup unsalted margarine, melted
1/2 cup matzo meal
1/2 cup pitted prunes (optional) or 1/2 cup raisins (optional)
2 tablespoons sweet wine or 2 tablespoons orange juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

Preheat oven to 375°. Grease an 11×7-inch baking pan. By hand or in
food processor in two batches, chop and mix all ingredients. Put in
prepared pan and bake for 45 minutes or until browned and bubbly.

I wanted to try something different in the way of green beans this holiday, so, again I searched and searched and searched the Internet, finally I think I struck gold with this recipe for Paula Dean’s Fancy Green Beans.

PAUL DEEN'S FANCY GREEN BEANS

Fancy Green Beans

Recipe courtesy Paula Deen

Prep Time: 15 min
Inactive Prep Time: Cook Time: 15 min
Level: Easy
Serves: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

• 2 tablespoons teriyaki sauce
• 1 tablespoon honey
• 1 tablespoon butter (Softa123’s Note: Use non-dairy margarine)
• 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
• 1 1/2 pounds fresh green beans
• 2 slices bacon (Softa123’s Note: Omit bacon or substitute beef frye.)
• 1/2 cup red bell pepper strips
• 1/2 cup thin onion wedges
• 1/2 cup whole cashews

Directions

In a small bowl, stir together the teriyaki sauce, honey, and butter.

Fill a bowl with cold water and ice cubes.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add the lemon juice. Drop in the beans and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, or until beans are bright green. Drain the beans in a colander and then plunge them into the iced water. Drain again and set aside.

In a skillet, cook the bacon until very crispy, crumble and set aside. Sauté the bell pepper and onion in the hot bacon fat for 2 minutes. Add the beans, cashews, and bacon to the skillet. Add the teriyaki-honey sauce and toss gently.

I am dying to try this next recipe. I guess I’m in the mood for changes this year, after all, as a female, I’m entitled to change things around!

COCOA HONEY CAKE


COCOA HONEY CAKE RECIPE

=======================
Ingredients:

2/3 cup honey
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1 tablespoon sliced almonds
1-1/2 cups flour, less 1 tablespoon
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
3 tbsps. unsweetened cocoa powder
1/4 cup apple juice (or orange juice, or water)
1 pinch nutmeg (hefty pinch)

Directions:

Step #1 Preheat oven to 325 degrees F, & lightly grease 8 X 4 loaf pan.

Step #2 Line the bottom of the pan with greased parchment paper.

Step #3 Whisk flour with cocoa powder, cinnamon, baking soda, baking powder, ginger, & nutmeg.

Step #4 Place beaten eggs in another bowl, & add sugar & honey, beating until smooth & light in color.

Step #5 Gradually beat in oil until mixed.

Step #6 Stir the egg mixture into the flour mixture alternating with juice (or water).

Step #7 Pour the batter into the prepared pan, & top this with sliced almonds.

Step #8 Bake 50 mins, or until pick comes out clean after inserting in center of the cake.

Step #9 Cool 15 mins, then turn out onto rack & peel off paper.

Step #10 Wrap in plastic when completely cool, then in foil wrap.

Enjoy the Cocoa Honey Cake recipe!

Another new recipe to add to my overflowing dbase is this brownie recipe. Paul and I absolutely love dark chocolate, so this is a must try in my house!

SUPER QUICK DARK CHOCOLATE BROWNIES

SUPER QUICK DARK CHOCOLATE BROWNIES
===================================
September 22nd 2011
Contributed by: joyofkosher.com

These better-for-you brownies are rich in chocolate, but balanced in sweetness by adding almonds, which also add a little crunch.

Times

Prep time: 10
Cook time: 25
Ready time: 35 min

Ingredients

1 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup dark chocolate cocoa powder
1/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 cup canola oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup dark chocolate chips
1/3 cup chopped almonds

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 °F (180 °C).

In large bowl, combine sugar, cocoa powder, flours, baking powder and salt.

In separate medium bowl, combine eggs, canola oil and vanilla. Combine egg mixture into flour mixture, mixing well. Stir in chocolate chips and almonds.

Spread batter in lightly greased 8- x 8-inch (20 x 20-cm) baking pan.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan on wire rack before slicing.

Source: Canola Info

Nutritients

Nutritional Information Quick Dark Chocolate Brownies Servings Per
Recipe: 16

Amount Per Serving Calories: 130 Total Fat: 6g Cholesterol: 15mg
Sodium: 55mg Total Carbs: 19g Dietary Fiber: 1g Protein: 2g

You can find the recipes for Rugelach and Honey-Almond Cookies at A Tzimmes

THE BLESSINGS FOR ROSH HASHANAH

Courtesy & Kindness of Chabad.Org

YOM TOV CANDLES - MAY THEY BURN BRIGHTLY FOR YOU!

Before the meal and its accompanying blessings, the woman of the house lights the Yom Tov Candles and recites the following blessing:

Blessing for Rosh Hashanah

Blessed are You, L-rd, our G-d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments and has commanded us to light the candle of the Day of Remembrance.

Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nai E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech Ha-olam Asher Ki-deshanu Be-mitzvo-tav Ve-tzvi-vanu Le-hadlik Ner Shel Yom Hazikaron.

Blessing For Rosh Hashanah when it coincides with Shabbat

Blessed are You, L-rd, our G-d, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments and has commanded us to light the candle of Shabbat and of the Day of Remembrance.

Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nai E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech Ha-olam Asher Ki-deshanu Be-mitzvo-tav Ve-tzvi-vanu Le-hadlik Ner Shel Shabbat veShel Yom Hazikaron.

Shehechiyanu Blessing recited on the First Night of Rosh Hashanah after the main Blessing (above) is said

Blessed are You, Lord our G-d, King of the universe, who has granted us life, sustained us, and enabled us to reach this occasion.

Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nai E-lo-hei-nu Me-lech Ha-olam She-heche-ya-nu Ve-ki-yi-ma-nu Ve-higi-a-nu Liz-man Ha-zeh

Kiddush

Before starting the Rosh Hashanah meal, we sanctify the holiday by reciting the kiddush over a cup of wine or grape juice.

When Rosh Hashanah occurs on Shabbat, say all the pre-Shabbat Kiddush prayers (such as Shalom Aleichem and Aishet Chayil) in an undertone before starting Kiddush.

On the second night of Rosh Hashanah, it is customary to place a new fruit [not yet eaten this season] before the one who makes Kiddush; he is to glance at it while reciting the Shehecheyanu (“Who has granted us life…”) blessing , bearing in mind that it applies to the new fruit as well.

Stand while reciting the Kiddush. Those listening to the Kiddush should respond “Amen” as indicated.

Take the cup of wine in the right hand and glance at the festival candles. The cup should be held at least three handbreadths (approximately 9 in.) above the table throughout the Kiddush.

On Shabbat, begin here.

The sixth day. And the heavens and the earth and all their hosts were completed. And G‑d finished by the Seventh Day His work which He had done, and He rested on the Seventh Day from all His work which He had done. And G‑d blessed the Seventh Day and made it holy, for on it He rested from all His work which G‑d created to function.1

On weeknights, begin here.

Glance at the wine and say:

Attention, Gentlemen!

Blessed are You, L-rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine. [Amen]

On Shabbat, add the words in parentheses.

Blessed are You, L-rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who has chosen us from among all nations, raised us above all tongues, and made us holy through His commandments. And You, L-rd our G‑d, have given us in love (this Shabbat day and) this Day of Remembrance, the festival of holy assembly,2 a day for (the remembrance of) sounding the shofar, (in love,) a holy assembly, commemorating the Exodus from Egypt. For You have chosen us and sanctified us from among all the nations, and Your word, our King, is true and enduring forever. Blessed are You L-rd, King over all the earth, who sanctifies (the Shabbat and) Israel and the Day of Remembrance. [Amen]

When Rosh Hashanah occurs on Saturday night, add the following:

Blessed are You, L-rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who created the lights of fire. [Amen]

Glance at the festival lights, then continue:

Blessed are You, L-rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who makes a distinction between sacred and profane, between light and darkness, between Israel and the nations, between the Seventh Day and the six work days; between the holiness of the Shabbat and the holiness of the Festival You have made a distinction, and have sanctified the Seventh Day above the six work days. You have set apart and made holy Your people Israel with Your holiness. Blessed are You L-rd, who makes a distinction between holy and holy. [Amen]

Blessed are You, L-rd our G‑d, King of the universe, who has granted us life, sustained us and enabled us to reach this occasion. [Amen]

Pour some wine from the cup to be distributed to those listening, and drink at least 2 ounces of the remaining wine while seated.

FOOTNOTES
1. Genesis 1:31; 2:1-3.
2. V. Ramban, Leviticus 23:2; Sforno, loc. cit. 23:2-3.
On the second night of Rosh Hashanah, it is customary to place a new fruit [not yet eaten this season] before the one who makes Kiddush; he is to glance at it while reciting the Shehecheyanu (“Who has granted us life…”) blessing , bearing in mind that it applies to the new fruit as well.

New Fruit

APPLES IN HONEY - HAVE A SWEET YEAR!

On the second night of Rosh Hashanah, a “new fruit,” i.e., a seasonal fruit which we have not yet tasted since its season began, should be present on the table when the holiday candles are kindled and during the kiddush. While reciting the Shehecheyanu blessing after candle-lighting and after the kiddush, one should have the new fruit in mind.

This fruit is eaten following the kiddush, before washing for bread. Before partaking of the fruit we say the following blessing:

Ba-ruch a-tah Ado-nai E-lo-hei-nu me-lech ha-olam bore pri ha-etz.

Blessed are You, L-rd our G d, King of the universe, who creates the fruit of the tree.

Challah in Honey

Immediately following the kiddush (and on the second night, the eating of the new fruit), we perform the ritual washing for bread. When everyone has returned to the table, we raise the two challah loaves and recite the Hamotzie blessing:

Ba-ruch atah A-do-nay, E-lo-hei-nu Melech Ha-Olam, hamotzie le-chem min ha-are-tz.

[Blessed are You, L-rd, our G d, King of the universe, who brings forth bread from the earth.]

Cut the challah, dip it in honey (some also dip it in salt), and have a bite. Pass around pieces and make sure everyone does the same.

Symbolic Foods

POMEGRANITES - MAY YOUR BLESSINGS BE MANY!

On the first night of Rosh Hashanah, after eating the challah with honey, it is customary to eat several foods which symbolize the type of year we wish to have:

We dip a piece of sweet apple into honey. Before eating it we say:

Ba-ruch a-tah Ado-nai E-lo-hei-nu me-lech ha-olam bore pri ha-etz.

Blessed are You, L-rd our G d, King of the universe, who creates the fruit of the tree.

Ye-hi ratzon she-ti-cha-desh alei-nu shanah tovah u-m’tu-kah.

May it be Your will to renew for us a good and sweet year.

A pomegranate is eaten, symbolizing our wish to have a year full of mitzvoth and good deeds as a pomegranate is filled with luscious seeds.

FOOTNOTES
1.If it is Shabbat, the Shalom Aleichem and Aishet Chayil hymns are recited before kiddush in an undertone.
2.Halachically, the two days of Rosh Hashanah are considered as “one long day.” This idea led some halachic authorities to doubt whether the Shehecheyanu blessing, which is normally recited at the onset of a holiday day, should be recited during the candle-lighting and kiddush of the second day of Rosh Hashanah.
To dispel any doubt as to the validity of this blessing, we also have in mind the new fruit, whose consumption also requires the recitation of the Shehecheyanu blessing.

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 8

Posted on September 21, 2011. Filed under: Appetizers, Apples, Cakes, Comfort Foods, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Family, Fish, Friends, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Meat, Menu, My Ramblings, Paerve, Poultry, Recipes, Rochester, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, Salad, Soup, Tried and True Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Jeremy and Marc Saying The Brachas

Imagine…Rosh Hashanah has arrived. Your house is company ready and smells heavenly with the aromas of the meal to come. The table is set. Your candles are in place for their blessing before the meal begins. You are dressed and are actually relaxing before your company is due to arrive. Even your kids (if you have you have young ones or even older ones living at home) are ready and are actually behaving. Your husband, and maybe some of your children, has left for shul to pray for all of you. What a perfect beginning to a perfect New Year. Ok, if this scene is typical of your home, please tell me your secrets!!! I have never been able to pull off an organized holiday meal.

Yes, I admit to being a procrastinator, but still, I do begin at least a week ahead. I make my lists, I plan a schedule…ok, so I never keep to the schedule, but still…I have brought up the baked goods from my freezer in the basement. My soup is cooking (reheating actually) and I’m skimming the fat from the top. My matzah balls look heavenly, but I’m not dressed, I have salads to make, and my kugel and tzimmes are cooking. I’m going to put the brisket back into the oven in a while. Oh dear…I have to set the table. Paul is helping and we’re yelling at each other to do this or that…we’re both over-stressed. He’s going up to get dressed and I know I won’t have time. He’s already showered. Me, I’ll have to wait till tomorrow. How do you people do it?

The doorbell rings and it’s the first of our company that arrives. I’m still in my jeans. I apologize and ask them to please sit down. I then put the hot appetizers in the oven to bake and ask if they would like anything to drink. I yell up to Paul that we have company. He comes down the steps all dressed and exhausted. I excuse myself, tell Paul that the appetizers are in the oven and ask him to watch them. I go upstairs, throw on my clothes. Dash on some lipstick and blush and run back downstairs. This is a scene my company is well used to.

After many years of this, I got smart and told everyone to wear jeans! I was then appropriately dressed when company came. When our friends, the Nussenbaums, came, Leo always went into the kitchen to check on the chicken soup. I think he wanted to make sure there were enough matzah balls for seconds. Our friend Beverly (May she rest in peace.) always brought the challahs. She taught us to rip the challah apart instead of cutting it into neat slices. She also introduced us to Brownstein’s challah which I still get to this day! We swear that they put a boxful of raisins into each challah. We couldn’t believe the difference between their challah and Malick’s challah. Our friends, the Rosenbaums, would come and Phyllis would come to help me in the kitchen, along with our friend Beverly. I have a very tiny kitchen, but we’d still manage.

Oops, the table isn’t set yet, we need extra chairs. Scott and his family come to our aid along with Fernando and Alex as Paul couldn’t bring them in from the garage himself. But, we had good family and friends. They knew what to expect. They all pitched in. They all contributed something to the meal. And we will finally all sit together to relax for what I prayed was a good meal! It usually was. This is what I suggest as a menu for you to have for your Yom Tov meal:

(Please note that the starred items have recipes included with this post or references to previous post. Doubled starred item means that the blessings are included in this post and tomorrow’s post.)

Rosh Hashanah 2011 Menu

Hors Doeuvres– Cohen’s Frozen Assorted Hors Doeuvres (Look for them in your grocer’s freezer section. I know you can find them at Wegman’s and Sam’s Club.) served with wine and soft drinks.

**Ceremonial Course – Wine with the brocha (blessing), challah dipped in honey with the hamotzi (blessing) and then wedges of sweet apples dipped in honey with the brocha. We enjoy the Bartenura brand kosher wines. Honey for dipping. I would look for something a bit more special than Suebee honey, if your budget allows it.

Appetizer – Give your guests a choice of chopped liver*, gefillte fish* or both. Enlist the help of one of your guests to serve while you dish out.

Soup – Chicken Soup* with Matzah Balls* is a must have for this meal, making sure you have enough for seconds. Make sure you serve seconds with a warning that there is a lot of food still to come! Again, enlist the help of one of your guests to serve while you dish out. Enlisting guests makes them feel more at ease and at home, I think.

Salad – Marilyn’s Rosh Hashanah Tossed Salad*

Main Dish – Brisket*

Side Dishes – Potato Kugel* and a sweet Tzimmes.* (To me it’s not a holiday without potato kugel . There is one exception and that is on Chanukah. For that you must serve potato latkes instead of potato kugel!)

Vegetable – Green Beans*

Desserts – Chocolate Honey Cake*, Honey Almond Cookies*, Rugelach* and Brownies*

Beverages – Wine for Bracha, Wine and Soft Drinks during dinner and black tea or tea without dairy products in it.

Chopped Liver

MARILYN’S CHOPPED LIVER
=======================
1 pound Baby Beef Liver
1 large Onion
2 Hard Boiled Eggs
1 small drop Oil
1 splash Manischewitz Concord Grape Wine
Salt and Pepper; to taste

Broil liver till cooked a tad more than rare. Let cool; meanwhile, chop the onion in a food processor fitted with the steel blade with a few on/off quick pulses. Sauté onion if you wish. Put onion into large mixing bowl. (I usually use a raw onion.)

Cut broiled liver into about 6-8 pieces and put into food processor fitted with steel blade. Process using pulse setting till it is smooth or chunky, to your taste. Mix liver with onion in a bowl.

Chop the hard boiled eggs in food processor fitted with steel blade. Pulse two or three times until eggs are nicely chopped; add to liver-onion mixture. Add drop of oil and splash of wine to the mixture. Season to taste with salt and pepper. (Marilyn’s Note: Salt is necessary in chopped liver. If necessary, you can use low sodium salt with no problem.)

This is my tried and true recipe. The wine adds a nice flavor to the liver.

Serve with crackers or matzah.

Enjoy!!!~Marilyn aka Softa123

Tri-Color Gefilte Fish

TRI-COLOR GEFILTE FISH – Parve
==============================
Nonstick Cooking Spray
2 (22 oz.) loaves Plain Gefilte Fish; defrosted in wrapper
1 (22 oz.) loaf Salmon Gefilte Fish; defrosted in wrapper
2 tbsps. FRESH Dill; chopped
1 Lemon
6 Cucumbers for Horseradish Wells + 1 EXTRA LONG Cucumber for Optional Top Garnish
Prepared Red Horseradish
Mayonnaise
Yellow Pepper; seeded, chopped into tiny dice for garnish

“This easy spin on traditional gefilte fish has three different colored layers for a sophisticated look. It takes only 5 minutes to prepare.

The recipe is based on a 9-inch springform pan with a removeable
bottom. If you are using a larger springform pan you may need 1-2
loaves per layer. Playing with the amounts won’t affect the cooking
method, but you may need to increase the cooking time by 10-15 minutes.” ~ Susie Fishbein

PREHEAT oven to 350° F.
Spray a 9″ spring form pan with nonstick cooking spray. Give it a
HEAVY, EVEN COAT.

Open each gefilte fish wrapper.

Place one plain loaf of gefIlte fish into a med. bowl. Add dill & juice from lemon. Mix thoroughly so that the dill is dispersed evenly. Set aside.

Using a thin spatula, spread the remaining plain gefilte loaf into an even layer on the bottom of the spring form pan. Top with an even layer of the salmon. On top of the salmon, spread an even layer of the lemon-dill mixture.

Cover the pan with foil. Bake for 1 hr. If the fish does not look set in the center, remove the foil & bake for 5 mins. longer.

Let cool & refrigerate overnight. This recipe can be made a few days in advance. As an optional garnish, slice a long UNPEELED cucumber by hand or by mandoline into PAPER-THIN slices. Lay the slices in concentric circle around the top of the fish.

Release the sides of the spring form pan. To serve as individual
servings, cut into wedges, like a pie. Trim any brown edges.

Cut the cucumbers into 2-3″ pieces. Hollow out the centers. Mix a few tbsps. of prepared horseradish with a little mayonnaise to make a pretty pink sauce. Fill cucumber wells.

Serve a slice of fish on a piece of leafy lettuce with a cucumber well.

You can decorate each plate with tiny squares of yellow pepper.

YIELD: 10-12 servings

SOURCE: “Passover by Design” by Susie Fishbein

This is one great recipe!!! I made it for a family dinner during
Pesach 2009. Everyone loved it, especially me!!! Not only is this
recipe a keeper, but I will never buy a jar of gefilte fish again.
This is too tasty and easy to make and the difference between jarred
and this recipe is significant!

Note: The butcher couldn’t get me the salmon gefilte fish, so I opened up 2 large cans of salmon, drained the liquid and discarded bones and skin. It worked!! ~Marilyn Sultar

ROSH HASHANNAH 2010 NOTE: This year I made with the salmon gefilte fish. I really prefer this recipe with the canned salmon. It has better flavor, texture and is more colorful! ~Marilyn aka Softa123

MATZAH BALL SOUP

MARILYN’S CHICKEN SOUP RECIPE
=============================
2 soup (or roasting) Chickens*; each cut into 8ths and washed and cleaned of any feathers
1 lb. Gizzards; washed
1 lb. Chicken Wings; washed and cleaned of any feathers.
1 lb. Chicken Necks; washed
1/4-1/2 bag Petit Carrots
3 large Parsnips; washed, peeled and cut into slices (not too thin, not too thick)
2 large Onions; each peeled, washed and cut into quarters
2-3 stalks Celery; each washed and the ends cut off, and then slice (not to thin not too thick)
3 heaping tsps. Chicken Bouillon Powder or 3 Cubes
1 heaping tbsp. Kosher Salt
1/4 tsp. Freshly Ground Pepper
4-5 Sprigs Fresh Parsley
1 tsp. Poultry Seasoning
Cold Water to cover everything in pot

*It is best to use Kosher Chickens in chicken soup as they have more taste than non-kosher chickens.

Put chicken into A HUGE STOCK POT first and then the rest of the
chicken parts. Cover with water making sure that there is enough water to also cover the vegetables! Put up to boil on MEDIUM HIGH heat.

Add the vegetables then the spices and herbs. Also add the chicken
bouillon. Stir everything together. Bring to a boil.

Turn stove down to low for about 1/2 hour, then turn down to simmer for 4-6 hours, until chicken is cooked and vegetables are tender. (DON’T OVER COOK AS YOU WILL BE REHEATING THE SOUP MOST OF THE TIME
YOU MAKE IT.). After it is ready, let it cool off enough to put into your refrigerator. The next day, before you go to serve it, skim off the fat and add water, if necessary. I usually find it necessary to add more. Add your already cooked matzah balls and bring all to a boil, then put on simmer until ready to serve.

MATZAH BALLS: Use the box mix! It’s easier and just as good.
However, if you wish, I do have a wonderful recipe I used to make
before I discovered the box mix!!! Enjoy! ~Marilyn AKA Softa123

Zucchini and Summer Squash For Our Salad.

MARILYN’S ROSH HASHANAH TOSSED SALAD
===================================
1 bag Mixed Greens
1 pt. Grape Tomatoes
1 Yellow Bell Pepper
1 Sweet Apple
1 bag Candied Walnuts
1 Cucumber
1/4 of a Zucchini
1/4 of a Summer Squash
Pomegranate Seeds (especially for the second day of Rosh Hashanah)
Seedless Red Grapes
Salad Dressing of your choice

Wash all vegetables and fruits. Dry well.

Put mixed greens into a large bowl. Add grape tomatoes and seedless
red grapes.

Dice yellow bell pepper, zucchini, summer squash, dice cucumber and
apple. Add to greens mixture.

Refrigerate salad at least an hour before serving.

Add candied walnuts and pomegranate seeds right before serving. Serve with your favorite salad dressing(s).

Hope everyone enjoys this recipe! ~Marilyn AKA Softa123

I will post recipes for the rest of the menu and prayers tomorrow. I’m falling asleep at the wheel here. But, here is another honey cake recipe to keep the count going! Enjoy!

Raisins and Walnuts Go Into This Yummy Honey Cake!

One Bowl Honey Apple Raisin Nut Cake Recipe
===========================================
Ready in: 1-2 hrs.
Difficulty: 2 (1=easiest : hardest=5)
Serves/Makes: 12

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup sugar
4 cups sifted flour
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 cup honey
1 cup coffee, cooled
3/4 cup oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 eggs
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
2 apples, peeled, cored and sliced

PREPARATION:

Sift all dry ingredients into a large bowl; stir together.

Make a well and add all the liquid ingredients. Add the raisins, nuts and apples.

Spray a round tube pan with oil, put in the batter, and bake at 350
degrees F for 45-60 minutes until a toothpick or a knife comes clean.

This recipe from CDKitchen for One Bowl Honey Cake serves/makes 12

Recipe ID: 95117

SUBMITTED BY: b011381

NOTE: I changed name of cake so as not to confuse it with my One Bowl Honey Cake. ~Softa123

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 9

Posted on September 20, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Lemons, Paerve, Parve, Prayer Request, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |


Talk about short, this will probably be the shortest post I’ve done thus far…My husband is in the hospital with a bleeding ulcer. I’m asking all my readers to please put him in your prayers. In thanks, here is today’s honey cake recipe:

Hazelnuts are also called Filberts.


Hazelnut Honey Cake
===================

Makes 10 servings

3/4 cup honey
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1/2 cup dry red wine
2 eggs
3 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon ginger
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup finely chopped hazelnuts
Honey Wine Glaze (Softa123’s Note: Recipe is at end of cake recipe.)

Combine honey, butter, wine and eggs; beat thoroughly.

Combine flour, baking soda, lemon peel, spices and salt; mix well.
Add dry ingredients to honey mixture; beat until thoroughly mixed.
Stir in hazelnuts.

Pour into greased and floured 13x9x2-in. pan.

Bake at 325°F for 35 to 40 minutes or until wooden pick inserted near center comes out clean. Cool 15 minutes on rack; invert cake onto serving plate or tray. Brush with Honey Wine Glaze.

Tip: For a kosher non-dairy meal, substitute non-dairy margarine for the butter.

Serving Size: 1/10th of recipe

Nutrition: 444 Calories * 17.8 g Fat Total * 7 g Protein * 67 mg Cholesterol * 65.8 g Carbohydrates * 275 mg Sodium * 1.8 g Dietary Fiber * 35% Calories from Fat *

Honey Wine Glaze

Makes 1/2 cup

1/2 cup honey
2 Tablespoons dry wine
1/2 teaspoon ginger

In small saucepan, honey, dry wine and ginger; microwave at HIGH (100%) 30 seconds or until consistency is thin enough to brush over warm cake.

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Rosh Hashanah Countdown – Day 10

Posted on September 19, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Cheese, Cookies, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Hope, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Paerve, Parve, Quote, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, Tried and True Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Beginnings by Maria Robinson

Note: Click on above image to read the quote.

This morning I got to thinking, “Wouldn’t it be fun if this New Year I could start my life all over! How would I do it?” Think about it…the possibilities are endless, especially if I was gifted with the knowledge I currently have. For one thing, I would stay in school and stay in the educational community. I should have listened to my Mother. But she wanted me to be a nursery school or kindergarten teacher. She was thinking too young. I love children that age, but I could not handle them as a teacher. I could not handle grammar (elementary) school or high school kids either. They would eat me alive. College age young adults, well that is iffy…no, my calling would have been to be a night school teacher for adults or preferably teach senior citizens new skills. I would have looked more into the computer fields of teaching. I always thought you had to be a math whiz to be in computers. But there are so many components to them that I am sure I could have found a niche.

Well, that’s not possible at this stage of my life, so how will I begin my life over? I don’t believe in making resolutions. They set you up for failure and that’s the last thing I need in my life. I do believe in thinking about possibilities but I haven’t thought about them enough in my life. So this year I am going to tackle my social life. I am going to gradually start living more in the real world rather than the cyber world. I am going to go out of my comfort zone. I’m going to look into doing some volunteer work again as that always made me happy. I’m not sure in what capacity this will take, but I’m going to investigate. I’m also going to concentrate on friendships. That is something I have been neglecting the past few years, and that is something important to me. I am also going to concentrate on communicating with my family members more. So, let’s see what the New Year will bring for me. What will it bring for you? What one or two things will you concentrate on in your life?

For today’s recipes, I’m going to concentrate on cookies. The first one is for my favorite rugelach recipe.

Ginger Ale

CINNAMON NUT RUGELACH
=====================
FLAKY GINGER ALE PASTRY:

1 cup All-Purpose Flour PLUS
1 tablespoon All-Purpose Flour
1/2 cup FROZEN Margarine; cut into 6-8 pieces
1/4 cup Ginger Ale, 7-Up, Fresca OR Soda Water (SOFTA’s Note: I use Ginger Ale.)
1/2 tablespoon Vinegar

FILLING:

2/3 cup Walnuts
1/3 cup Sugar
1 teaspoon Cinnamon
1 Egg White; lightly beaten

FLAKY GINGERALE PASTRY:

With the steel knife in your food processor, process flour and
margarine with on/off turns (about 2-3 seconds at a time) for 4 or 5
times, until the mixture begins to look like coarse oatmeal.

Combine ginger ale with vinegar and add through the feed tube while machine is running. Process JUST UNTIL the dough begins to gather in a mass around the blades, about 8-10 seconds. DO NOT OVERPROCESS!!!

Remove dough from machine, divide into two balls. Wrap each ball in
waxed paper and CHILL IN THE REFRIGERATOR AT LEAST 1 HOUR, OR
OVERNIGHT. The colder the dough, the easier it is to roll. The dough may be frozen at this point if you are not ready to finish making the rugelach. (SOFTA123’S NOTE: You can freeze the baked rugelach also. This recipe freezes well!)

NOTE: This recipe can be doubled in one batch successfully.

Flour dough lightly. Roll one portion of dough on a floured pastry
cloth or floured board. Roll it into a circle about 1/16″ thick.
(SOFTA123’S NOTE: Make sure to keep second ball of dough in
refrigerator until ready to work with it.)

FILLING:

With the steel knife in your food processor, process walnuts, sugar and cinnamon until nuts are fairly fine, about 12-15 seconds.

RUGELACH:

Sprinkle dough with about 1/4 cup of cinnamon/nut mixture. Cut with a SHARP knife into 12 triangles (each circle). Roll triangle up from the outside edge towards the center. Repeat with remaining dough and filling.

Dip the Rugelach first in egg white , then in cinnamon/nut mixture.
Place on a GREASED, FOIL-LINED cookie sheet. bake at 375° Fahrenheit
for 18-29 minutes, until lightly browned.

NOTE: Ingredients for filling may also be doubled successfully in one batch. Extra filling may be stored in a plastic bag in the freezer.

I made this for the first time for my nephew, Dov’s, Bar Mitzvah. They were easy to make and turned out delicious. I then began making them for Rosh Hashannah and my step-son, Scott, loved them. One of the reasons I like this recipe is because it is paerve.

This recipe came from “The Pleasures of Your Processor” cookbook by
Noreen Gilletz. ~Softa123

Almonds

Almond Honey Rugelach
=====================
1 cup butter or margarine, softened
3 oz. cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup honey, divided
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup finely chopped almonds
1/2 cup dried cherries or cranberries

Cream butter and cream cheese until fluffy. Add 3 Tablespoons honey and mix well. Mix in flour until dough holds together. Form into a ball, wrap and refrigerate 2 hours or longer.

Divide dough in 4 portions; on a floured board roll each portion into a 9-inch circle. Combine 2 Tablespoons honey and lemon juice; mix well. Brush dough with honey mixture; sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon over entire surface.

Combine almonds and dried cherries; drizzle remaining honey over
mixture and mix well. Spread 1/4 of almonds mixture onto circle of
dough, stopping 1/2-inch from outer edge. Cut into 8 triangular pieces.

Roll from wide outer edge toward tip. Gently bend both ends to form a crescent. Place on oiled parchment paper-lined baking sheet and
refrigerate 20 minutes or longer.

Repeat with remaining dough and filling. Bake at 350°F for 20 to 25
minutes or until golden brown. Cool on racks.

Tip: Freezing tip: For longer storage, package unbaked crescents in
freezer-safe container or bags and freeze until ready to bake.
Crescents may be stored in freezer up to 3 months. Thaw before baking.

Servings: 32

Honey Almond Cookies

Honey-Almond Cookies
Source: Diana’s Desserts

Servings: Makes 4 dozen cookies

Comments:

The kids (and the grown-ups too) will love these delicious honey-almond cookies for Rosh Hashanah, bringing you a “sweet” new year! ~ Diana

Ingredients:

2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup honey
1/4 cup butter or stick margarine, softened
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
1 large egg white
Cooking spray
1/4 cup sliced almonds, chopped

Instructions:

Lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine flour, baking soda, and salt in a bowl. Combine sugar, honey, butter, and oil in a bowl; beat at medium speed of a mixer until well-blended. Add extracts and egg white to sugar mixture. Beat until well-blended. Stir in flour mixture (dough will be sticky).

Coat hands lightly with cooking spray; divide dough into 2 equal portions. Shape each portion into a 9-inch log. Wrap logs individually in plastic wrap; freeze 3 hours or until firm.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F/190 degrees C. Cut each log into twenty-four 1/4-inch-thick slices, and place 1 inch apart on baking sheets coated with cooking spray. Press almonds into cookies. Bake at 375 degrees F for 9 minutes. Cool 2 minutes or until firm. Remove cookies from pans; cool on wire racks.

Makes 4 dozen cookies.

Original Source: Recipe adapted from Cooking Light
Date: September 14, 2006

St. Remy's Brandy - My Husband's Favorite!

Lekach Honey Cake
=================
1/2 cup strong coffee
1 cup honey
1 tablespoon brandy, optional
2 eggs
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 cups flour
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves

Combine coffee, honey and brandy; mix well. Beat eggs in mixing bowl. Add oil and brown sugar. Combine flour, baking powder, baking powder, baking soda and spices; mix well. Add flour mixture and honey mixture alternately to egg mixture. Pour batter into greased 9-inch square pan.

Bake at 300°F for 55 to 60 minutes or until cake springs back when
lightly touched.

Nutrition: 226 Calories * 3 g Fat Total * 4 g Protein * 36 mg
Cholesterol * 46 g Carbohydrates * 104 mg Sodium * <1 g Dietary Fiber * 13% Calories from Fat *

Servings: 12

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ROSH HASHANNAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 11

Posted on September 18, 2011. Filed under: Chocolate, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Oranges, Parve, Recipes, Rochester, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, Theatre, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |


I overslept today, so please forgive me. This will be a very short post today, but I did want to tell you about the play that my Mom and I went to see last night (the hubby opted out). I told you a little about it on Friday. Anyway, it was put on at MuCC on Atlantic Avenue in Rochester, New York. MuCC stands for Multi-use Community Cultural Center. (More about that later.)

Charlotte Bronte

Anyway, we saw John W. Borek Presents William Luce’s B R O N T E starring Meredith Powell, a local Irondequoit actress and directed by Rochester’s own Michael Arve. Let me tell you this, my husband and the rest of you who did not see this production was missing a theatrical masterpiece! Ms. Powell was incredible! After the play was over, I learned for the house manager that Ms. Powell only had four weeks to learn this taxing part. Can you imagine having to memorize a two-and-a-half hour script for a one-person play in just four weeks? I know I could not do it. But, this was a minor point. The major points of Ms. Powell’s performance are these: first of all, her on-stage energy was catching. She had the audience riveted to her every move and every wonderful nuance of her expressive face. Next, she not only had to memorize lines, take directions from the extremely talented Michael Arve, but she had to cultivate many different accents as she led us through conversations with such personages as her father, her aging housekeeper, and all of her siblings. It was a treat just listening to her. Then, Ms. Powell had to learn French, if she didn’t already know some, but her French accent sounded flawless to me! And she even had to sing. What a talent…And Mr. Arve’s directing was flawless. It was so good that if I hadn’t known better, I would have thought Ms. Powell did everything on her own! What a team these two theatrical talents are! I can’t wait to see their next colaboration. Cudos to all involved!!!

If you did miss this production of Bronte, I hope you do get to see the play someday. It really is a wonderful piece of theatre and you really get to know Charlotte Bronte, author of “Jane Eyre,” and through her, we get a glimpse of her sisters Emily (author of “Withering Heights) and Anne (author of Agnes Grey), as well as the rest of her family and their lives. A rich piece of literary history!

In honor of this production of Bronte and the entire Bronte family, here is today’s honey cake recipe:

Join Me For A Cup Of Tea

DEVONSHIRE HONEY CAKE

Perfect for a cream tea.

Recipe uploaded byGeraldene Holt
Recipe by Geraldene Holt

Difficulty and servings

Makes 12 slices

Preparation and cooking times
Cook 1 hr 30 mins

Ingredients

250g clear honey, plus about 2 tbsp extra to glaze
225g unsalted butter
100g dark muscovado sugar 3 large eggs , beaten
300g self-rising flour

Preheat the oven to fan 140C/ conventional 160C/gas 3.

Butter and line a 20cm round loosebottomed cake tin.

Cut the butter into pieces and drop into a medium pan with the honey and sugar. Melt slowly over a low heat. When the mixture looks quite liquid, increase the heat under the pan and boil for about one minute. Leave to cool for 15-20 minutes, to prevent the eggs cooking when they are mixed in.

Beat the eggs into the melted honey mixture using a wooden spoon. Sift the flour into a large bowl and pour in the egg and honey mixture, beating until you have a smooth, quite runny batter.
Pour the mixture into the tin and bake for 50 minutes-1 hour until the cake is well-risen, golden brown and springs back when pressed.

A skewer pushed into the centre of the cake should come out clean.
Turn the cake out on a wire rack. Warm 2 tbsp honey in a small pan and brush over the top of the cake to give a sticky glaze, then leave to cool. Keeps for 4-5 days wrapped, in an airtight tin.

Per slice
336 kcalories, protein 4g, carbohydrate 43g, fat 17 g, saturated fat 10g, fibre 1g, sugar 25g, salt 0.29 g
Recipe from Good Food magazine, July 2003.

NOTE: Please note that I did not have the opportunity to convert this recipe.~Marilyn

Okay, for our American bakers who don’t like to do measurement and ingredient conversions, here is another honey cake recipe for today!

Always A Good Choice

Chocolate Swirl Honey Cake (P)
===============================
Source: Marcy Goldman, Baker Boulanger website http://www.betterbaking.com

Serves: 12-16

Honey Spice Batter:

1-3/4 cups all purpose flour
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1-1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup honey
3/4 cup white sugar
1/4 cup brown sugar, packed
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla
1/2 cup brewed tea
1/4 cup orange juice

Chocolate Batter:

1-1/2 cups all purpose flour
1/3 cup cocoa, measured and sifted
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 cup white sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup cola, flat

Garnish:

1/2 cup chocolate, grated
Confectioners’ sugar, optional

Non-stick cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Generously spray a 9″-10″ tube pan with cooking spray.

For honey spice batter, place flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, cloves, and allspice in a bowl. Blend with a whisk, then make a well in the center. Stir in oil, honey, white and brown sugars, eggs, vanilla, tea, and orange juice. Blend well to make a smooth batter. Set aside.

For chocolate batter, in a separate bowl, combine flour, cocoa, salt, baking powder, and baking soda. Make a well in the center and whisk in white and brown sugars, oil, eggs, vanilla, and cola. Blend well to make a smooth batter.

Pour honey spice batter into prepared pan. Top with chocolate batter. Place pan on a baking sheet and bake 55-65 minutes or until cake springs back when gently touched.

Cool 10 minutes then un-mold and place on a serving platter. While cake is still warm, sprinkle on grated chocolate and allow to melt.

If you prefer, chill cake to set chocolate and then dust with confectioners’sugar.

Posted by Nancy Berry

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 12

Posted on September 17, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Cakes, Chocolate Chip, Cookies, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, Traditions | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |


Honey for Sweetness in All It's Meanings.

Today’s topic is honey. Since we eat honey on Rosh Hashanah I thought I would write a bit about the Jewish connection with this sweet. First of all, did you know that bees are not kosher? I didn’t. Who would have thought about it one way or the other? After all, who eats bees? Not I! But the paradox is that honey made from bees is kosher even though it is stored in the bee’s digestive sac. Did we really want to know that? Nah! 🙂 Anyhow, there is more to the connection of honey and Judaism than for symbolizing a sweet and good year on Rosh Hashanah.

Honey is supposed to be served with every meal, smeared on the bread over which we recite the “Hamotzi” blessing (“Hamotzi” is the blessing recited over bread every time you eat it, no matter if it is a holiday or a normal day.) from Rosh Hashana until after Sukkot, honey is served with every major meal. It is smeared on the bread over which we recite the “Hamotzi” blessing. A sweet apple is dipped into honey on Rosh Hashana and we eat dishes prepared with honey. Especially popular in Jewish homes is the honey cake.

The first mention of honey in Jewish writings is in the bible as one of the gifts sent by Jacob with his sons when they went down to Egypt to seek food during the famine as it was a valuable commodity during Biblical times.

The custom of honey on the Jewish table during the High Holiday period is an ancient and universal Jewish custom. It is already recorded in the works of the Babylonian Geonim (the presidents of the two great Babylonian, Talmudic Academies of Sura and Pumbedita, in the Abbasid Caliphate, and were the generally accepted spiritual leaders of theJewish community world-wide in the early medieval era, in the 7th century, and probably dates back to even much earlier times.

Throughout the the Tanakh (the Jewish bible), honey is mentioned in connection with the land of “Milk and Honey.” Today, Jews still refer to Israel as the land of “Milk and Honey.” What is interesting about this is that the honey in the Tanakh is thought by the Rabbis to be honey from dates and figs which grow well in the Middle East. But I didn’t even know that there was such a thing. I thought all honey comes from bees, didn’t you? So now, in that light, I can understand the reason why Israel is called “the land of Milk and Honey.”

Although honey was held in great esteem, there is a strict prohibition in the Torah against bringing an offering of honey on the altar of the Beth Hamikdosh (the Holy Temple). In this respect honey was treated like leaven, which was also forbidden. The Torah does not explain why honey was not to be offered at the altar. But in some holy sources one reason, at least, is given: Honey, like leaven, causes fermentation, and is symbolic of the unruly human nature, and of certain bad traits of character like pride, conceit, arrogance. The prohibition of bringing honey (and leaven) to the altar was to remind the people that G-d detests conceit and arrogance, but loves humility and self-discipline. On Rosh Hashanah and on Yom Kippur we pray that G-d forgives us for such behavior, so I again wonder why we eat honey on Rosh Hashanah, again, another paradox. And with that thought, here are some recipes to try out for Rosh Hashanah this year.

Honey Apple Pie Recipe
======================
Honey apple pie is perfect for Rosh Hashanah, but you don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy it year-round. A puff pastry crust is filled with spiced, honeyed Granny Smith apples and a streusel topping.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Ingredients:

1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
1 tablespoon margarine or butter, melted
2 tablespoons granulated white sugar

Filling:

3 pounds (about 8 to 9) Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and sliced 1/4-inch thick
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 cup margarine or butter (1/2 stick), melted and cooled to room temperature
1/2 cup honey

Topping:

1 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup granulated white sugar
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
Cup ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup cold margarine or butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350 F. Line a 9 x 13-inch baking pan with non-stick
foil.

Roll out puff pastry between two sheets of plastic wrap to 11 x 15
inches, large enough to cover bottom and up sides of the pan. Place in the bottom of the foil-lined baking pan. Brush lightly with melted
margarine or butter. Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons white sugar. Bake for 10 minutes.

Filling:

In a large bowl, whisk flour, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Toss
sliced apples in flour mixture. Drizzle with melted margarine or
butter, and then honey. Toss again. Let rest while you make the
topping.

Streusel Topping:

Whisk together flour, white sugar, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Place flour mixture into the bowl of a food processor. Add the cold margarine or butter cubes. Pulse until mixture resembles coarse bread crumbs.

Toss the apple mixture again, then distribute in an even layer over
puff pastry in the baking pan. Sprinkle with the streusel topping
mixture.

Bake about 1 hour or until apple are tender.

Yield: 24 to 36 servings, depending on cut size

A Honey of a Chocolate Chip Cookie 4 U!

Honey Chocolate Chip Cookies
============================
By Bluenoser on August 20, 2005

Prep Time: 5 mins
Total Time: 15 mins

Yield: 2 dozen

About This Recipe: “a different twist on this type of cookie”

Ingredients

1/2 cup butter
1/3 cup honey
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 eggs
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1-3/4 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup chocolate chips

Directions

Cream butter and sugar, then add honey. Add egg and vanilla.
Add dry ingredients and mix well. Stir in chocolate chips. Drop by
teaspoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheet. Bake 375F 10 minutes.

It's Time To Bake!

Soft Honey Cookies Recipe
=========================
Photo by: Taste of Home
Soft Honey Cookies Recipe

This old-fashioned cookie has a pleasant honey-cinnamon flavor and a tender texture that resembles cake. It has been a family favorite for years and I thought the recipe should be shared with your readers.

This recipe is: Quick

16 Servings
Prep: 15 min. + chilling Bake: 10 min.

Ingredients

1/4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 egg
3 tablespoons honey
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon salt

Directions

In a small bowl, beat sugar and oil until blended. Beat in egg; beat in honey and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt; gradually add to sugar mixture and mix well (dough will be stiff).

Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours.

Drop dough by tablespoonfuls 2 in. apart onto a greased baking sheet. Bake at 350° for 8-10 minutes or until bottoms are lightly browned. Cool for 1 minute before removing from pan to a wire rack. Store in an airtight container.

Yield: 16 cookies.

Nutrition Facts: 1 cookie equals 77 calories, 2 g fat (trace saturated fat), 13 mg cholesterol, 29 mg sodium, 13 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, 1 g protein. Diabetic Exchange: 1 starch.

Soft Honey Cookies published in Reminisce Extra November 2008, p53

Get out the flour, the eggs and the honey...

Spiced Honey Cake Recipe
========================
115 g /4oz light brown sugar
150 g /5oz butter
175 g / 6oz clear honey
200 g /7 oz self raising flour
Half teaspoon each of: ginger, ground cloves, cinnamon
Quarter teaspoon caraway seeds
1 tablespoon water
2 beaten eggs
350 g / 12 oz icing sugar

Method

Heat the oven to 180 °C / gas 4 / 350 °F, and grease a 900ml/ 1½ pint
fluted mold (Bundt Pan) .

Place butter, honey, sugar and water in a pan, and heat gently until
butter is melted and sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat and
allow to cool.

Meanwhile, sift the spices with the flour. Make a well in the flour
mixture, then pour in the cooled honey mixture and the eggs. Beat until smooth. Pour into the tin and bake for 40 – 50 mins. until the cakes is well risen and golden brown.

To check the cake, insert a skewer into the centre – it should come out clean.

Variations: Substitute the honey with orange marmalade or apricot jam. Or, substitute the honey with marmalade with orange marmalade minus one tablespoon, which you can replace with maple syrup.

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDAY: DAY 14

Posted on September 15, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Hope, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Paerve, Parve, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |


While surfing the net for inspiration for this article, I came across a wonderful gift which I would like to share with you. It is actually a gift from a man who calls himself “Uncle Eli.” Uncle Eli many, many years ago wrote a great Hagaddah for Pesach which you can still find online. It is written as Dr. Seuss would have written it.

Today I found that he has done something similar called “Uncle Eli’s Mahzor.” Here is the link. Go see and read it. I think you will be glad you did. The URL for this the Mahzor is:http://people.ucalgary.ca/~elsegal/EliMahzor/index.html

I wanted to put an article here about Rosh Hashanah…A thought that might be a bit different from what we usually see in Rosh Hashanah. Or let me put that another way. I wanted an article that would make me see Rosh Hashanah in a different light. As you could tell by the poem I wrote for yesterday’s post, the most important things about the High Holidays for me were:

1. Get my cooking and baking done for all the company we would have.
2. Make sure I got the prayers we would need ready.
3. Pray for the New Year to be better than the last.
4. Go to Shul to see everyone.
5. Thank G-d for what I did have…if I remembered.

Well, this year I see things a bit differently. This year as I am making my Yom Tov here on the internet, I am learning a lot. As I told you in an earlier Rosh Hashanah Countdown post, I learned that it is really the creation of Adam and Eve that we are celebrating, not the New Year. And today I learned that on Rosh Hashanah the Haftorah we read is the story of Channa who was barren. Channa was married to Elkanah. Channa was barren and she cried and prayed to G-d to give her children. After many years of trying to have children, Elkanah took a second wife, Penina. Penina was mean spirited and taunted Channa with each of her pregnancies and the birth of each of her children.

We further read that Channa finally gives birth to a son, Samuel, who later becomes a profit. And when Samuel is born, one of Penina’s children dies. This happens each time Channa produces a child. So we see that everything in life is tenuous. You may be childless one day, but may have a child the next. You may be rich one day and poor the next. So you should never scorn one who doesn’t have what you have, instead, be grateful. G-d decides each year who should be with child, who should be healthy, who should be rich, and who shall be barren, who should be ill and who shall be poor. Most importantly, G-d decides who shall live and who shall die. But we are taught that G-d is merciful and through good deeds (Tzadaka), prayer and repentance we can perhaps be dealt with more kindly. G-d’s judgment of us a bit more lenient. You may be skeptical about G-d. You may be skeptical about Rosh Hashanah. But would it hurt to be more kind? Just think if for even one day you did someone a kindness, what a better world it would create. Multiply that by gazillions of people and can you imagine the domino affect it would have on the world! Now, bite your tongue and not say or do something negative for even one day and multiply that by gazillions of people in addition to the good deed you have done. Wow…it boggles the mind…who knows, perhaps that is how we will earn the reward of peace on earth!

Just one tiny lesson. I think I am learning more by doing this countdown than I have by spending hours in Temple reading words in a book. You see, I don’t really read. I listen to the beautiful music of the Hazzan’s voice. I am mesmerized by the chanting. I read the prayers but they are meaningless to me because I strive to read them in Hebrew which does not come easily to me, in other words, I “practice my Hebrew,” instead of reading the English and maybe understanding and thinking about the real reason I’m in Temple. My mind wonders as I look to see who I know and acknowledge them. This too distracts me from the reason I should be in Shul. If you were honest with yourself, why are you in Shul? What does Rosh Hashanah mean to you?

No matter what your answers are, here is today’s honey cake. May you all be inscribed in the book of life, good health and happiness.

Honey Cake W/Candied Ginger And Pecans (P, Tnt)
===============================================
Source: “1000 Jewish Recipes, ” by Faye Levy
Posted by : Maxine Wolfson
Yield: 2 8″x4″ loaves

Ingredients:

1-1/2 teaspoons instant coffee granules
6 tablespoons hot water
1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Small pinch of cloves
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup honey
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup very finely chopped crystallized ginger
1/3 to 1/2 cup pecans, coarsely chopped

Preheat oven to 325°F.

Lightly grease, or line with parchment paper, two 8″x4″ loaf pans.

Dissolve coffee granules in hot water and let cool.

Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and cloves in a
medium bowl.

Beat eggs lightly in a large bowl with an electric mixer. Add sugar and honey and beat until mixture is very smooth and lightened in color.

Gradually add oil and beat until blended. Add half the flour, then half the coffee, then the rest of the flour and rest of the coffee. Stir in crystallized ginger and nuts.

Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake 50-55 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean. Cool in pan for about 15 minutes. Turn out onto rack and carefully peel off liner. When completely cool, wrap in foil.

Wrapped tightly, cake will last at room temperature about a week.

Serve as thin slices.

Maxine Wolfson’s Notes:

1. I double-brewed a cup of coffee and used
6 tablespoons of that.
2. Doubled the cinnamon and used 1/8 tsp of cloves.
3. Ran out of crystallized ginger, so used fresh chopped ginger.
4. Original recipe called for one pan, but I used two and got
good-sized cakes.
5. Used almonds instead of pecans.
6. Using a convection oven, baked for 45 minutes, and it was
done, probably due to the smaller volume.
7. Batter tasted strongly of coffee. Finished cake brings out
more of the cloves.

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN: DAY 15

Posted on September 14, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Paerve, Parve, Poetry, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |


In honor of Rosh Hashanah I wrote this poem which I think really signifies the feeling I get on all holidays. Let me know what you think of it! Look for today’s honey cake at the end of the poem.

RUSH, RUSH, RUSH
A Poem for Rosh Hashanah

by Marilyn Sultar
©Marilyn Sultar 9/12/2011

We rush to start our baking,
The house smells so sweet as honey cakes, raisin and apple challah we bake.

Rush, Rush, Rush

We rush to cook our Yom Tov meals as Rosh Hashanah is swiftly approaching.
We rush to make our briskets, potato or luchsen kugels and tzimesses ahead.

Rush, Rush, Rush

We rush to make our chicken soup and matzah balls, without which it just wouldn’t be Yom Tov.
We want to make as much ahead of time to put in our freezers so we don’t have to rush so much.
Time is ticking, tick, tick, tock.

Rush, Rush, Rush

We rush to clean our houses spic and span.
We rush to vacuum and dust and hide everything away so company doesn’t see our mess.
We rush to clean the silverware and our fanciest serving platters.

Rush, Rush, Rush

Rosh Hashanah is finally here.
Now we rush to set our table so we can quickly gobble down our festive meal.

Rush, Rush, Rush

We rush to wake up early in the morning so we can rush through breakfast.
We rush through breakfast so that we can quickly take our showers, brush our teeth and make room for the next person in line to do the same.
We rush to get dressed in our holiday best.

Rush, Rush, Rush

We rush to get to our synagogues to get a good parking spot.

Rush, Rush, Rush

We rush so much we forget to take the time to enjoy our family and friends because all we do is

Rush, Rush, Rush.

Honey Cake, Chiffon I (P)
=========================

Source: “Spice and Spirit of Kosher-Jewish Cooking”

Serves: 12

4 eggs, separated
1 cup sugar
1 cup honey
1 cup oil
3-1/2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 cup strong tea
1/4 to 1/2 cup raisins

Beat egg whites and set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, eat egg yolks until fluffy. Gradually add sugar and beat well. Beat in honey, then oil.

Mix together all dry ingredients, and add alternately to mixture with
tea. Stir in raisins. Fold in egg whites gradually and mix together
again.

Pour into a 9″x13″ greased pan. Bake at 300°F for 1 hour.

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN: DAY 16

Posted on September 13, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Autumn, Cakes, Cookies, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Paerve, Poetry, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |


I like to bring poetry into my holiday celebrations. Somehow it just makes them more meaningful to me. I began this trend when I wrote my first Hagaddah many years ago. So I went searching for appropriate poems on the internet that I thought you might enjoy as much as I do.
This poem comes from a website called Poems for Free

ROSH HASHANAH OPENS THE PAGE
Written by and Copyrighted by Nicholas Gordon

Rosh Hashanah opens to the page
On which is writ, for good or ill, our fate.
Still wrestling with angels, we engage,
Harrowing our hearts, our destined state.
However, “we” encompasses us all,
As though we were but droplets in a wave
Suspended on its journey to the shore,
Hard put to any single droplet save.
And so we pray not only for ourselves,
Nor only for our family, friends, or tribe:
All must be our congregation, else,
Having thus lost hope, we won’t survive.

I like this poem because it stresses the fact that we are not alone. That Jews are part of the larger community of mankind. That no one religion should pray just for themselves. As we teach our children to pray for more than themselves, we need to learn to include all in our prayers. Perhaps if we all did that there can be more understanding and peace in the world. So this year, when you are in shul, remember to say an extra prayer for peace and understanding of all people. Let’s make this year the year that we succeed in that endeavor!

In this spirit, I’d like to offer a recipe from for an Italian honey-nut pastry to serve with your traditional honey cake. I haven’t tried this recipe, but it looks like it will be going into my try this year file. My mouth is watering! I found the recipe at Kitchen Daily.

Sfratti
=======
New Media Publishing / Photography: Flat Art Studios.com / Stylist: Abigail Donnelly

1 hr 20 mins total
1 hr prep

RECIPE FILED UNDER
Nut, Italian, Jewish, Baking, Dessert, Cookie, Winter, Christmas, Rosh Hashanah & Yom Kippur
Provided By: Lauren Braun Costello

Great for kids
Budget friendly
Worth the effort
Quick and easy

Ingredients

Dough Ingredients:

3 cups unbleached flour
1 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
2/3 cup sweet white wine
1/3 cup vegetable oil or melted margarine

Filling Ingredients:

1 cup honey
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 orange, zested
1 pound walnuts, finely chopped

Directions

In a large mixing bowl, add the flour and make a well in the center.
Place the sugar and salt in the well. Add the wine and oil gradually
while mixing with a fork until you form a smooth dough. Empty the dough onto a floured cutting board and knead for 5 minutes. Return the dough to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside in the refrigerator.

To make the filling, bring the honey to a rapid boil in large saute pan over high heat and cook for 2 minutes without stirring. Add the spices, orange zest, and nuts and cook for an additional 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove the pan from the heat and continue to stir until the mixture is cool enough to handle. Divide into 6 equal portions. On a floured cutting board, roll each portion into a thin log, about a foot long, and set aside.

Remove the dough from the refrigerator and divide it into 6 equal
portions. Using a rolling pin, roll one piece of dough to form a 4 x 14 strip. Place one honey/nut log at the edge of the dough and fold the sides over the ends of the log. Then wrap the dough around the filling, covering it completely. Place on a sheet pan, seam-side down.

Bake in a preheated 375°F oven for 20 minutes. Allow the sfratti to
rest only for 5 minutes before removing from the sheet pan, then
immediately wrap in foil. Once completely cool, cut on bias into 1-inch slices, immediately before serving.

Sfratti keep for several weeks without refrigeration when wrapped in
foil. In fact, they taste better after they have been allowed to age
for a few days.

And now for the main event, our countdown honey cake recipe of the day! I haven’t tried to make this cake yet, but it sounds like a winner. I found the recipe at http://www.honey.com . I’m getting fatter just posting all these recipes as I want to try them all!

Harvest Honey Spice Cake
========================
1 cup honey
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/3 cup strong brewed coffee
3 eggs
2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1-1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups peeled, chopped tart apples
1/2 cup toasted slivered almonds
1/2 cup dried cranberries
Powdered sugar
Toasted sliced almonds, for garnish

Using electric mixer beat together honey, oil and coffee. Beat in eggs.

Combine dry ingredients; gradually add to honey-egg mixture, mixing
until well blended.

Stir in apples, almonds and cranberries. Pour into lightly greased and floured bundt or tube pan. Bake at 350°F for 35 to 40 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.

Remove from oven; cool on wire rack. Dust with powdered sugar; garnish with sliced almonds, if desired.

Nutrition: 325 Calories * 55 g Carbohydrates * 11 g Fat Total * 2 g
Saturated Fat * 6 g Protein * 2 g Dietary Fiber * 53 g Cholesterol *
265 mg Sodium * 28% Calories from Fat *

Servings: 12

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