ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 3

Posted on September 26, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Apricots, Breads - Yeast, Cakes, Cherries, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Jewish Prayers & Blessings, Kosher Recipe, Lemons, My Ramblings, Oranges, Parve, Peaches, Pies, Poultry, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


3
 The gematria of the Hebrew letter ג
 A symbol of holiness. The Holy of Holies occupied one-third, and the Holy Place two-thirds, of the entire Temple.
 There were three vessels each for the altar of burnt offering, the altar of incense, and the Ark.
 The candlestick had twice three arms (besides the shaft, which also held a lamp), and each arm had three knobs.
 The priestly blessing consists of three sections (Num. vi. 24, 25)
 In kedusha, word “holy” is recited three times.
 The patriarchs of the Jewish people
 The number of prayers recited daily
 The number of Shabbat meals
 The number of shofar sounds
 The Shalosh Ragalim (Jewish festivals): Pesach, Shavuot, and Sukkot]
 Number of aliyot for a Torah reading on a weekday or at mincha
 Date in Tishrei of the Fast of Gedalia

SOFTA123’S NOTE: Glossary for the above will appear at the end of this post, after the honey cake recipe. The above I found at Wikipedia.com and for the glossary definitions I went to both Wikipedia.com and Chabad.org.

I was just searching for something to inspire me to write about today when I read a wonderful article by by Rabbi Benjamin Blech which was posted on Aish.com’s website. The article was entitled “Can we be optimistic about the coming new year?” I highly recommend reading this article. Anyhow, in reading this article, I came up with the inspiration of finding out the Judaic symbolism of the number for number 3 (as today is Countdown Day Number 3) and write about lists of three. But first I wanted you to see what the Judaic meaning of the number is according to an article I found on Wikipedia.org. That is the reason why I began this post the way I did. Ok, so this post is all about me.

MY MOST IMPORTANT 3

My three grandchildren: (In order of birth)

Marc
Rachael
Joshua

3 OF MY FAVORITE WOMEN

My Mother
My Aunt Hushie
Golda Meir

3 OF MY FAVORITE MEN

My Father
My Uncle Hockey
My Husband

3 OF MY FAVORITE MEMORIES

Marrying my husband
Throwing my parents surprise parties
The birth of all three of my grandchildren (ok, so I cheated…I know this should be three separate items, but it’s my blog so I can make up my own rules!)

3 WORLD EVENTS I VIVIDLY REMEMBER

The 1972 Munich Olympics when 11 Israeli athletes were killed by 5 Arab terrorists.
The 1976 Raid on Entebbe
9/11
The Assassination of President Kennedy

I had to include 4 events here because there was no way that I could exclude any of these four horrible events.

3 OF MY FAVORITE WORDS

Oy
Love
Great

3 OF MY FAVORITE BOOKS

God’s Game by Father Andrew Greeley
Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon
The Eight by Katherine Neville

3 OF MY FAVORITE MOVIES

Backstreet
Beloved Infidel
A Man and A Woman

3 OF MY FAVORITE SONGS

Maggie May – Rod Stewart
500 Miles – Bob Dillon
Atlantis – Donovan

3 OF MY FAVORITE FOODS

Potato Latkes
Potato Kugel
Hot Dogs

3 OF MY FAVORITE THINGS TO DO

Read with my husband
Blog
Crochet

Now, in honor of the number 3, I will post 3 extra recipes for your Rosh Hashanah celebration!

A Sweet Treatment for Chicken!

Cardamom Honey Chicken
======================

Filed under Chicken, Gluten-Free, Main Course

Cardamom Honey Chicken Recipe

Ingredients

Marinade

4 tablespoons Honey
2 tablespoons Sherry
1 teaspoon Cardamom Seeds; ground with mortar and pestle
1 teaspoon Peppercorns; ground

Chicken

6 Chicken Breasts OR one whole Chicken, cut into parts
2 tablespoons Olive Oil
1 Lemon; thinly sliced
Salt and pepper

ELISE’S NOTE: “On my recent trip to New Zealand, my hosts sent me home with a wonderful cookbook from BeesOnline, a local café and honey factory right outside Auckland. The Cardamom and Honey-Glazed Chicken recipe caught our eye and we made it a few days ago. I’ve never thought to use cardamom as a spice for chicken before; the result was quite fragrant and delicious. The leftovers made for a flavorful chicken salad the next day.”

Posted by Elise on Jul 2, 2006

Method

ELISE’S NOTE: If a recipe calls for ground cardamom, it is best to start with whole pods. Break open the pods to release the tiny brown and black cardamom seeds. Use a spice grinder or mortar and pestle to grind the seeds.

1 PREHEAT oven to 390°F. Warm the honey, stir in the sherry, cardamom and peppercorns. Place marinade and chicken in a LARGE bowl, coat chicken with marinade. COVER with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.

2 Heat olive oil in a LARGE frying pan at MEDIUM-HIGH heat. Sear the chicken, skin side down, until golden.

3 Place lemon slices in a roasting pan. Lay the chicken pieces on top. Brush with the marinade. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Place in the oven and bake until done, approximately 15 minutes for breasts, 20 minutes for thighs, wings, and drumsticks.

Remove from oven and LET REST for 10 minutes BEFORE serving. Pour out drippings from the pan into a gravy boat for gravy.

Serve with rice, mashed potatoes, or couscous.

Honey Apple Pie With Orange Lattice Crust

Honey Apple Pie With Orange Lattice Crust
=========================================

Source: Bon Appétit | March 1998

User rating: 4 forks

Main ingredients: Honey, Cherry, Orange, Peach, Apricot, Apple

Cuisine: American

Type: Pie/Tart

Yield: Makes 8 servings

“Using orange juice instead of water in the crust enhances the fruit flavors in the filling. To prevent the dough from sticking, lightly flour the work surface and the dough, sprinkling with more flour as needed; also, roll just to the edges of the dough, not over them, rotating the dough often. “

Ingredients:

For crust:

2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons chilled vegetable shortening, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
6 to 7 tablespoon chilled orange juice

For filling:

2 generous tablespoons coarsely chopped dried tart cherries
2 generous tablespoons finely chopped dried apricots
2 generous tablespoons finely chopped dried peaches
2 tablespoons orange juice
2-1/2 pounds Golden Delicious apples, peeled, cored, thinly sliced
3-1/2 tablespoons all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted
1 tablespoon grated orange peel

Preparation :

Make crust:

Combine flour, sugar and salt in large bowl; add butter. Using fingertips, rub in butter until pieces range in size from rice grains to peas. Add shortening; rub in until pieces are size of
small peas. Sprinkle 5 tablespoons juice over, tossing gently with fork to blend. Continue adding enough juice 1 tablespoon at a time, tossing with a fork, to form moist clumps. Gather dough into ball; divide into 2 parts, 1 slightly larger than the other. Flatten dough onto disks. Wrap in plastic; chill 1 1/2 hours or up to 1 day.

Make filling: Mix cherries, apricots, peaches and orange juice in large bowl. Let stand 30 minutes.

Mix in apples, flour, cinnamon and cardamom; then mix in honey, butter and orange peel.

Position rack in bottom third of oven, and preheat to 425°F.

Roll out larger dough disk on lightly floured surface to 13-inch round. Transfer dough to 9-inch-diameter glass pie dish. Trim overhand to 1/2 inch.

Roll out second dough disk on lightly floured surface to 12-inch round. Using fluted pastry wheel or knife, cut dough into 1/2-inch-wide strips.

Spoon filling into bottom crust.

Arrange 6 pastry strips evenly atop filling. Arrange 6 more strips at right angles, forming lattice. Fold under ends of strips with overhanging dough.

Crimp crust edge decoratively.

Bake pie 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F. Bake until apples are tender and juices bubble thickly around edge, about 1 hour 10 minutes longer. Transfer pie to rack. Cool 1 hour.

New Years Apple Challah

New Year’s Apple-Cinnamon Challah
=================================
Dough ingredients:

1 cup warm water (110 degrees F)
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup oil or melted butter
2 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla
2-1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons dry yeast
5 to 6 cup flour

Apple filling:

3 cups coarsely chopped apples
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon lemon juice (skip if apples are tart)

Egg wash:

1 beaten egg
1 teaspoon sugar
Coarse sugar, for sprinkling, optional

1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the first seven dough ingredients,
in order listed. Stir in a cup or two of the flour, and then add yeast.

2. Add enough additional flour to equal about 5 cups, and stir/knead
into a smooth dough, adding additional flour if needed. Knead dough for 8-10 minutes. Shape into a ball, place in a greased bowl, cover, and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 45-60 minutes.

3. Place apple filling ingredients in a medium bowl and toss to coat.
Set aside.

4. Punch down the risen dough, kneading to remove excess air bubbles.
On a lightly-floured surface, roll the dough into a large round, about 1/2-inch thick. Spread apple mixture over the dough.

5. Fold the edges of the dough over the apples and continue to
fold/roll the dough to make one big lump with the filling enclosed. Let rest 5 minutes.

6. Grease a 10-inch spring form pan. Place spring form pan on a large
cookie sheet (to catch any leaks during rising/baking).

7. Now, this part gets messy. Using a sharp knife (I use a serrated
one), cut off chunks of the dough and place them in the prepared pan.
You should end up with 15-20 chunks of dough (though a particular
number doesn’t matter). The apple pieces should be randomly dispersed
throughout the dough chunks. Sprinkle with any escaped apple pieces.

8. Combine the egg and sugar and then dab the egg wash over the top of the dough. Sprinkle with coarse sugar if desired. Cover gently with a piece of plastic wrap and place pan in a warm location to rise.

9. *When dough has almost doubled in size, pre-heat oven to 350 degrees and then place baking sheet/spring form in the middle of the oven (remove the piece of plastic wrap first, of course!!!) to bake for 45-55 minutes or until done.

POSTER’S NOTE: When I make this, usually the edges of the top get well-browned before the middle is cooked. So, after about 25-30
minutes, I cover the darker areas loosely with foil — sometimes
forming a large loose “ring” of foil (with no foil in the middle) to
lay on top.

10. When challah is done, remove from the oven and cool in the pan for 10 minutes. Turn out of pan onto a cooling rack and cover with a clean towel until completely cool.

Additional Poster’s Notes:

This recipe was passed to me from a friend, Cheryl O. I believe it is
originally from a Jewish cookbook. The instructions and photos are my
own. 🙂

Preparation Time:

1 hour (plus rising time) Cooking Time:

45-55 minutes or longer

SOFTA123’S NOTE: To make the challah truly Kosher, before baking take a piece of dough about the size of a golf ball, roll it into a ball and recite the following blessing over it:

Baruch ata Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kideshanu be-mitzvosav ve-tzivanu lehafrish challah min ha-isah.

You are blessed, Lord our God, Sovereign of the world, Who made us holy with His commandments and commanded us to separate challah from the dough.

Then burn the ball (I let it bake alongside the challah) then throw it out. DO NOT EAT IT!!! This symbolizes the sacrifice given to the priests at the ancient Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

And for the grand finale….today’s honey cake recipe!

Pistachios in this recipe offer a nice change from walnuts.

Honey Cake
==========
Ingredients

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground clove
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 cups honey
1-1/2 cups orange juice
1/2 cup shelled white pistachio nuts
1/2 cup shelled walnuts
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup dried apricots cut in bite-size pieces
1 teaspoon unsalted margarine for greasing the baking pans
1/4 cup slivered almonds

Preparation

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

2. In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients together. Set aside.

3. In another bowl, mix the honey, orange juice, the nuts except the almonds and the dried fruits together.

4. Add the orange juice-honey mixture to the flour. Mix well with a wooden spoon.

5. Grease two 9-by-5-inch loaf pans with the margarine. Divide the batter evenly between the two pans.

6. Sprinkle the almonds on top of the batter.

7. Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees and bake for one hour and 45 minutes. Test to see if the cake is done by inserting a skewer in the center. If it comes out dry, the cake is done.

8. Cool the cakes on a rack. Loosen the sides before unmolding.

YIELD : 14 to 16 servings

Originally published with FOOD; HOPE AND HONEY By COLETTE ROSSANT, September 21, 1986

GLOSSARY

gematria – Gematria or gimatria (Hebrew: גימטריה‎, gēmaṭriyā) is a system of assigning numerical value to a word or phrase, in the belief that words or phrases with identical numerical values bear some relation to each other, or bear some relation to the number itself as it may apply to a person’s age, the calendar year, or the like. A good example of Gematria is the Hebrew word Chai (“life”), which is composed of two letters which add up to 18. This has made 18 a “lucky number” among Jews, and gifts in multiples of 18 are very common among Jews.

Holy of Holies – The Holy of Holies, as its name implies, was the most sacred part of the entire ancient Holy Temple in Jerusalem. Entry was forbidden except on Yom Kippur when the High Priest entered the Inner Sanctuary. In Hebrew it is called Kodesh HaKodashim.

priestly blessing – The priest(s) recite(s) aloud the fifteen words of the priestly blessing. In Hebrew it is called Birkat Kohanim. The Kohanim recite the blessings word-by-word as the Cantor recites them. The Birkat Kohanim are only said during Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur in the Diaspora.

‘May G d bless you and guard you.
‘May G d shine His countenance upon you and be gracious to you.
‘May G d turn His countenance toward you and grant you peace.'” (Numbers 6:24-26)

Last year, Paul and I accompanied Rhona, Jeremy and Marc to their synagogue for Rosh Hashanah services. At Congregation Ahavath Israel we were treated to the most poignant recitation and chanting of the Birkat Kohanim that I have ever been to. There an elderly father and his middle-age son, both with wonderful voices, chanted the Birkat Kohanim with such feeling that I was totally in awe. It is one of the things I will miss most by not going to Kingston to celebrate with Rhona, Jeremy and Marc this year. I wish that Scott, Lisa, Rachael and Joshua could experience Rosh Hashanah in Kingston with us.

kedusha – The Kedusha (Hebrew: קדושה‎) is traditionally the third section of all Amidah prayer recitations. The silent Amidah it is a short prayer, but in the repetition, which requires a minyan (10 men over the age of 13, although in Conservative and Reform congregations women over the age of 13 are also counted), it is considerably lengthier. The liturgy varies among different communities and during different services, but they all hold in common three lines from the Bible (though translations vary): Kadosh Kadosh Kadosh Adonai Tz’vaot M’lo Khol Ha’aretz K’vodo (“Holy, Holy, Holy, The Lord of Hosts, The entire world is filled with His Glory”), Baruch K’vod Adonai Mim’komo (“Blessed is the Glory of the Lord in Its Place”), and Yimloch Adonai L’Olam, Elohayich Tziyon L’dor Vador Hall’luyah (“The Lord shall reign forever, Your G-d, O Zion, from generation to generation, Hallelujah”)

The Kedusha is enhanced during the morning and Musaf services of Shabbat and Festivals and between the biblical verses there are more praises. The Musaf service of Shabbat and Festivals as well as all of the Kedushas of Yom Kippur additionally contain the opening line of the Shema prayer.

patriarchs – The three patriarchs of the Jewish people are Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

prayers – Jewish Law instructs Jews to pray three times a day, once in the morning, once in the afternoon and once in the evening. These prayers are called Shacharit (morning), Mincha (afternoon) and Maariv (evening).

Shabbat meals – On Shabbat (the Jewish Sabbath), Jews are required to eat three meals. The first one occurs on Friday night and is a lavish dinner. The second required meal is Saturday afternoon, after everyone goes to the synagogue to prey, and it also is a lavish meal. The third meal is Saturday evening and it is a light meal.

shofar – For an in depth description of the shofar (ram’s horn), please see my post of September 24, 2011. There are three sounds that the shofar makes tekiah, shevarim and teruah. Tekiah is a single long burst of the shofar, shevarim are three medium bursts and teruah is at least nine short bursts.

The Shalosh Ragalim – Jewish festivals Pesach (Passover also known as The Festival of Freedom) celebrates freedom, Sukkot (The Festival of Booths) celebrates Jewish unity, and Shavuot (The Festival of Weeks) celebrates the giving and receiving of the Torah and the 10 Commandments.

aliyot – Honors given at Torah services. There can be no more than seven honors given at one service. These honors include opening and closing the Ark, undressing and dressing the Torah, saying the Blessings over the Torah, carrying the Torah and reading the Torah.

Tishrei – Tishrei (pronounced Tish-ray) is the Hebrew month that corresponds to the Gregorian calendar months of September-October. It is the month in which the Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot are celebrated.

Fast of Gedalia – On the third day of Tishrei we mourn the assassination of Gedaliah ben Achikam, governor of the first Jewish commonwealth in the Holy Land. When Gedaliah was assinated, Jewish autonomy came to an end. In his honor and memory Jews fast on this day.

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