THANKSGIVING – #7

Posted on November 19, 2011. Filed under: Autumn, Candy, Chocolate, Chocolate-Mint, Comfort Foods, Crochet Patterns, Dairy, Desserts, Fun, General Crafts, Kosher Recipe, Munchies, Party Ideas, Snacks, THANKSGIVING, Thanksgiving Crafts, Thanksgiving Prayer, Thanksgiving Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |


The First Thanksgiving

 

We Gather Together Hymn

 

We gather together to ask the Lord’s blessing;
He chastens and hastens His will to make known.
The wicked oppressing now cease from distressing.
Sing praises to His Name; He forgets not His own.

Beside us to guide us, our God with us joining,
Ordaining, maintaining His kingdom divine;
So from the beginning the fight we were winning;
Thou, Lord, were at our side, all glory be Thine!

We all do extol Thee, Thou Leader triumphant,
And pray that Thou still our Defender will be.
Let Thy congregation escape tribulation;
Thy Name be ever praised! O Lord, make us free!

 

-Adrianus Valerius
-Theodore Baker (translator)

 

Today’s post is for those who like to craft.  We have to relax somehow and get out of the kitchen, so why not try to relax and have fun making one of these projects.  Notice, I said ONE project.  We still have baking and cooking to do! I have included a crochet pattern for a cornucopia centerpiece, a cute crocheted turkey hot pad, the cutest turkey nut bowl which is on my “must try to make” list, a gorgeous serving platter and a centerpiece that will go perfectly with the table cloth and napkin place cards that you can find at https://atzimmes.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/thanksgiving-3/ .  I even found directions on how to make Pilgrim place cards for those of you who opt not to make the table cloth and napkin place cards.  At the end of the crafting ideas I am attaching an easy recipe for Bavarian Mints.  Hope you enjoy!

 

Thanksgiving Crocheted Cornucopia

Submitted by Anonymous on Fri, 12/26/2008 – 15:10

Thanksgiving Cornucopia with Indian Corn and squash

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays and I always get irritated when the stores seem to just pass it by. This year I am not going to let that happen, all this month I will be posting a different pattern every week so that you can make your very own cornucopia. We will make several different types of squash and a piece of Indian corn. Materials for the cornucopia: Size H hook, 7 inch metal craft ring, 4 oz of any shade of brown yarn & a marker

Row 1: ch 4, 7 dc in 4th ch from hook, join to form a ring Row 2: ch 3 (this does not count as 1st dc) fpdc(front post double crochet) around 1st dc and in remaing 6 dc, join to 1st fpdc. Row 3: ch 3 (this now counts as 1st dc) fpdc around 1st fpdc of previous row, *dc in top of next fpdc, fpdc in same stitch(increase made) repeat from * to * around , join. Row 4: ch 3, *fpdc in 1st fpdc, dc in next dc, around join. Row 5: ch 3, dc in same st, *fpdc around next fpdc, 2 dc in next dc * repeat from * to * around, join. Row 6: ch 3, dc in dc’s, fpdc in fpdc Row 7: ch 3, 2 dc in next dc,* fpdc in next fpdc, dc in next dc, 2 dc in next dc, repeat from * to * around, join Row 8: ch 3, dc in dc’s fpdc in fpdc. Rows 9 – 22: Repeat rows 7 & 8 having one more dc between fpdc(you will be increasing a total of 7 stitches per row) until you have 10 dc between each fpdc. Row 23-24: repeat row 6 Row 25: Place 7 inch craft ring in front of your work (crochet is closes to your body) ch 1, * insert hook into next stitch and under ring, yo (this will go over the top of the ring) pull through stitch, yo pull through both loops on hook*, repeat from * to * all the way around ring, join, ring is now attached to your horn. Edging: ch 1 , *sc in same stitch, trc in next stitch * repeat from * to * around.

Indian Corn

I’m going to tell you how this whole idea came about, I was in Walmart and I happen to pass by the beads and there it was, one little package of #345 Americana Multipony beads. For some reason I suddenly thought those are the colors of Indian corn. Then I went to the yarn to pick up some yellow and there they all were the fall colors and the ideas just flooded my little head. I started out just with the idea of Indian corn and then the rest followed, ok now you know I am not a sane person but honestly this is how most of my ideas come to me at the spur of the moment. Indian Corn 1 package of #345 Americana Multi pony beads 1 3 oz skein of Red Heart color 0220 Cornmeal Size H hook marker I picked out all the reds, oranges, and a few black beads, string them all onto your yarn before we begin, You should have 83 beads but as a safety measure I always string on 2 extra beads just incase. Do not join rounds, use a marker to mark beginning of each row. Ch 2, 3 sc in 2nd ch from hook. Row 1: 1 sc in each sc Row 2: 1 bsc (bead single crochet) in each sc Row 3: 2 bsc in each bsc, total of 6 bsc Row 4 – 14: 1 bsc in each bsc Row 15: *ch 30 sc in next sc repeat from * 5 more times, end off leaving a long tail. Wrap the long tail tightly as possible just above the last bsc row made (this gathers all the ch 30’s to look like the husk)

Striped squash

1 3 inch styrofoam ball or batting for stuffing size I double ended hook 1 3 oz skein of Red Heart color 0391 Artichoke 1 3 oz skein of Red Heart color 0313 Aran starting with artichoke, ch 17, skip 1st chain from hook, pull up a loop in next 16 ch, push all loops down to other side of hook turn. Attach white, remove loops on hook, put loops back on hook turn. Using artichoke remove loops, put loops back on. Continue until you have 17 rows of artichoke and 16 rows of aran. With aran, remove loops off of hook, stretch piece around styrofoam ball , using aran slip stitch to beginning artichoke row, end off aran leaving a long tail. Weave aran through top pull tight to close up end, finish off. End off artichoke leaving a long tail, weave artichoke through opposite end pull tight to close up finish off.

Bumpy Squash

I know that the names of the patterns are not that creative but they are original! 1 3 inch styrofoam ball or batting for stuffing Size I afghan hook 1 3 oz skein of Red Heart color 0368 paddy green Size 10 thread white **1 strand of white size 10 thread and 1 strand of yarn are held together through out*** Row 1:ch 15, work Tunisian simple stitch, Row 2: Pull up next 2 stitches, *work bobble in next stitch as follows: (yo insert hook into next st, yo and draw loop through)3 times, yo and draw loop through 6 loops on hook, booble made. Pull up loop in next 3 stitches, repeat from * to end of row. Row 3: Remove loops Row 4: *work bobble in 1st stitch, pull up a loop in next 3 stitches, repeat from * to end of row. Repeat rows 2 to 4 , 5 times, then repeat row 2 & 3 once. Stretch around Styrofoam ball, sew last row to row 1. Thread a piece of yarn through one end, pull tight, finish off repeat for other end.

Pointy Squash

1 3 inch styrofoam ball or batting for stuffing Batting for stuffing Size H hook 1 3 oz skein of Red Heart color 0368 paddy green 1 3 oz skein of Red Heart color 0245 orange to mark beginning of each round, place marker in last sc of each round. With green, ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook. Row 1: 2 sc in each sc (12 sc) Row 2: *sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc repeat from * around (18 sc). Row 3: *sc in next 2 sc, 2 sc in next sc repeat from * around (24 sc) Row 4: *sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc in next sc repeat from * around (30 sc) Row 5: *sc in next 4 sc, 2 sc in next sc repeat from * around (36 sc). Rows 6 – 8: work even, at end of row 8 attach orange. Row 9: ch 3 (count as 1st dc) dc in remaining 35 sc, join to top of 1st dc. Row 10: ch 3 , dc in next 4 dc, fpdc in next stitch, *dc in next 5 dc, fpdc in next stitch repeat from * around. Row 11: ch 3 , dc in next 2 dc, decrease one dc (yo pull up loop in next dc, yo pull through 2 loops on hook, yo pull up a loop in next dc, yo pull through 2 loops on hook, yo pull through 3 loops on hook) fpdc in next fpdc stitch, *dc in next 3 dc, decrease, fpdc in next fpdc stitch repeat from * around. Insert Styrofoam ball now. Begin to stuff as necessary with batting as you complete the following rows. Row 12: ch 3 , dc in next 3 dc, fpdc in next stitch, *dc in next 4 dc, fpdc in next stitch repeat from * around . Rows 13 – 16: repeat row 11 until there is only 1 dc inbetween fpdc. Rows 17 – 21: ch 3, *fpdc in next fpdc stitch, dc in next dc, repeat from * around. Row 22: Work 1 fpdc in each fpdc. End off leaving a long tail, thread through top pull tight.

Turkey Nut Dish

===============

“With holiday season upon us, my  favorite thing to do is curl up by the fire place with a cup of hot cocoa nearby and a crochet project that will enhance my table decorations and bring delight to my guests.

 

Not only will the array of goodies offered on the table bring “oohs” and “aahs” from my guests, but my Turkey Nut Dish will add whimsy to any holiday table and prompt squeals of delight from the children as well…”

 

“Add this clever decoration to Thanksgiving dinner by filling this gobbler’s dish with nuts in their shells or other tasty treats!” ~ Beverly Mewhorter

 

Design by Beverly Mewhorter

 

Skill Level

 

Beginner

 

Size

 

5 1/2 inches tall

 

Materials

 

Worsted weight yarn: 2 1/2 ounces brown, 1 1/2 ounces autumn ombre, small amounts of red and orange

Size G/6/4mm crochet hook or size needed to obtain gauge

2 (12mm) wiggle eyes

Fiberfill

1-pound plastic container (3 1/4 inches tall x 4 1/2 inch diameter top opening)

Hot-glue gun

Tapestry needle

Gauge

 

4 sc = 1 inch

Check gauge to save time.

 

Pattern Notes

 

Weave in loose ends as work progresses.

 

Sl st to join each rnd in beg st.

 

Bowl Cover

 

Outer Cover

 

Rnd 1 (RS): With brown, ch 4, 11 dc in 4th ch from hook, join (see Pattern Notes) in top of beg ch-4. (12 dc)

 

Rnd 2: Ch 3, dc in same st as beg ch, 2 dc in each rem dc around, join in top of beg ch. (24 dc)

 

Rnd 3: Ch 3, dc in same st as beg ch, dc in next dc, [2 dc in next dc, dc in next dc] rep around, join in top of beg ch. (36 dc)

 

Rnd 4: Working in back lps for this rnd only, ch 3, dc in each st around, join in top of beg ch.

 

Rnds 5-10: Ch 3, dc in each dc around, join in top of beg ch. At the end of Rnd 10, fasten off.

 

Inner Cover

 

Rnds 1-3: Rep Rnds 1-3 of outer cover. (36 dc)

 

Rnds 4-8: Ch 3, dc in each dc around, join in top of beg ch. At the end of Rnd 8, leaving a length of yarn, fasten off.

 

Place inner cover inside plastic container and outer cover over outer edge, working through sts Rnds 8 of inner cover and Rnd 10 of outer cover, sew sides tog around top edge.

 

Head

Rnd 1: With brown, ch 2, 8 sc in 2nd ch from hook, join in beg sc. (8 sc)

 

Rnd 2: Ch 1, 2 sc in each sc around, join in beg sc. (16 sc)

 

Rnd 3: Ch 1, [sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc] rep around, join in beg sc. (24 sc)

 

Rnd 4: Ch 1, sc in each sc around, join in beg sc.

 

Rnds 5-7: Rep Rnd 4.

 

Rnd 8: Ch 1, [sc in next sc, dec 1 sc over next 2 sc] rep around, join in beg

sc. (16 sc)

 

Neck

 

Rnds 9-20: Rep Rnd 4. At the end of Rnd 20, leaving a length of yarn, fasten off.

 

Stuff head and neck with fiberfill. Flatten Rnd 20, sew neck opening closed.

Sew head and neck to outer cover over Rnds 5-10.

 

Beak

 

With orange, ch 4, sl st in 4th ch from hook, ch 4, sl st in same 4th ch from hook, leaving a length of yarn, fasten off. Fold beak in half and sew to head over Rnd 7.

 

Wattle

 

With red, [ch 3, sl st in 3rd ch from hook] 6 times (6 bumps), sl st in same ch as 5th bump, fasten off. Sew first bump over beak.

 

Eyes

 

Glue wiggle eyes to face.

 

Wings & Tail Feathers (make 5)

 

Row 1: With autumn, ch 5, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each rem ch across, turn. (4 sc)

 

Rows 2-11: Ch 1, sc in each sc across, turn.

 

Row 12: Ch 1, [dec 1 sc over next 2 sc] twice, do not turn. (2 sc)

 

Rnd 13: Working around entire outer edge, ch 1, [sc in next st, ch 3] rep around, join in beg sc, fasten off.

 

Sew a wing to each side of outer cover and three tail feathers to back of outer cover.

 


Tom Turkey Hot Pads 

 

Expect to gobble up compliments when you crochet these whimsical hot pads from designer Beverly M., Apache Junction, Arizona. These turkeys are sure to make a return appearance year after year.

Materials Needed (for one):

  • · Worsted-weight yarn—3 ounces of white ( Beverly used Red 
    Heart Soft White yarn); and small amounts each of brown, gold, green, orange, red and yellow
  • · Size J/10 (6mm) crochet hook
  • · Two 7mm glue-on wiggle eyes
  • · Fabric glue
  • · Yarn or tapestry needle
  • · Scissors  

Gauge: Working with two strands of yarn as one, 3 scs and 3 rows = 1 inch. Slight variations in gauge will change the finished size a bit.

Finished Size: Turkey hot pad measures about 8 inches wide x 7 inches high. 

Directions:

HOT PAD: Working with two strands of white yarn as one, ch 21.

Row 1: Sc in second ch from hk and in each remaining ch across, ch 1, turn: 20 scs.

Row 2: Sc in each st across, ch 1, turn: 20 scs.

Rows 3-20: Repeat Row 2: 20 scs.

Ch 10, sl st in last st of Row 20 for hanging loop. Fasten off.

Use yarn or tapestry needle to weave in all loose ends.

TURKEY: Body: Round 1: With brown, ch 4 for first dc, dc in fourth ch from hk 13 times, join with a sl st in top of beginning ch: 14 dcs.

Round 2: Ch 3 for first dc, dc in same st, work 2 dcs in each remaining dc around, join with a sl st in top of beginning ch: 28 dcs. Fasten off.

Head: With brown, ch 4 for first dc, dc in fourth ch from hk 13 times, join with a sl st in top of beginning ch: 14 dcs. Fasten off.

Beak: With gold, ch 2, sl st in second ch from hk. Fasten off. Use yarn or tapestry needle to weave in all loose ends.

Feather: With red, ch 7, sc in second ch from hk and in each remaining ch across, work 2 scs in last ch, sc in each ch along opposite side. Fasten off.

Repeat to make one feather each of orange, yellow and green yarn.

Feet: With gold, ch 4, sl st in fourth ch from hk, ch 4, sl st in fourth ch from hk. Fasten off.

Finishing: Use yarn or tapestry needle to weave in all loose ends.

ASSEMBLY: Referring to photo as a guide, glue body and then head to hot pad. Glue feathers around top outer edge of body and feet to lower edge of body. Glue beak to center of turkey’s head. Glue eyes above beak. Let dry.

ABBREVIATIONS
ch(s) chain(s)
dc(s) double crochet(s)
hk hook
sc(s) single crochet(s)
sl st slip stitch
st(s) stitch(es)

Autumn Plate

 

You can create a plate for all four seasons with this simple laminating technique. Use your imagination and find unique shapes, flat ornaments, ribbons and other embellishments for your plate. A plate decorated in this wayshould always be washed by hand.

Materials


11″ (28cm) clear glass square plate
Paper leaves
Gold micro beads
Liquid laminate
Paper glaze
Scissors
¼ -inch (19mm) wash brush
Plastic cups

Paper Palette


About the papers


The papers used in this project are colored mulberry with the inclusions of mango leaves. The mongo leaves add a rich texture to the paper. They are machine made in Thailand but have a wonderful handmade feel.

1.   Arrange the Leaves


Lay the plate right side up and arrange the leaves under the plate so you can see what they look like. Arrange the leaves so some are going off the edge of the plate. Set the leaves to the side in pattern you want for the plate. Turn the plate upside down (on top of one or two plastic cups, if you like). Brush the back of the plate with liquid laminate and begin to place the leaves face down on the plate.

2.   Adhere the Leaves


Brush the back of the leaves with laminate and smooth with your fingers. Press the corners of the leaves down to form tightly to the shape of the plate.

3. Add the Micro Beads


Trim the leaves that over the edges with scissors. While the liquid laminate is still wet, sprinkle the back of the plate with gold micro beads. Add a bit more laminate if necessary. The bead placement can be fairly random.

4. Apply Liquid Laminate


Brush the excess beads of the back of the leaves. Tear the mulberry papers into random sizes. Apply the laminate directly to the paper pieces before you put them on plate. Use the ¾ -inch (19mm) wash brush to apply laminate. Lay the laminate paper pieces on the back of the plate.

5. Add the Remaining Paper


Continue adding pieces of mulberry paper in random color patterns. Let the papers go over the edges of the plate. When the entire plate is covered, trim the excess papers from the edges. Press the edges of the plate with your finger to ensure the paper is firmly bonded to the glass. Set aside to dry. Brush the back of the plate with generous coat of paper glaze.

 

The Autumn Dish instructions were found at The Holiday Spot website.

 

 Pilgrim Place Card Holders

 

What you’ll need: Permanent color markers, straight wooden clothespin, black pipe cleaner, 1 liter plastic bottle with cap, construction paper, a paper plate, glue, paper plate.

 

How to make: At the top of the clothespin, draw a face using the permanent markers. Color the rest of the clothes pin black. Tie the pipe cleaner just below the “face” to make the arms. With a craft knife, cut the top off a plastic 1-liter bottle, 3 1/4 inches down from the cap and discard the bottom. Remove the bottle cap and color it and the bottle top black. For the pilgrim man, wrap a pipe cleaner around his feet and stand him up in the bottle cap. Cut out and glue on a paper hat and vest. To finish the woman, wrap a pipe cleaner around her waist and fit her into the bottle top. Glue on a paper apron and bonnet. Cut name tags from a paper plate rim and attach them to the pilgrims’ arms.

 

The instructions for the Pilgrim Place Card Holders were found at Mother Nature Network’s website.

Thanksgiving Centerpiece:

Glittered Corn from Martha

Stewart.com

A few organic elements, enlivened with a bit of gilding, evoke fall’s abundance. To make this eye-catching centerpiece, we turned a glass compote into a horn of plenty with glittering Indian corn and squash.

Tools and Materials

  • Dried corn, from Dry Nature Designs, 212-695-8911
  • Craft glue
  • Fine glitter in Florentine Gold, by Martha Stewart Crafts, at Michaels
  • Foam brush
  • Kettle of boiling water

 

Glittered Corn How-To

Pick some ears of dried corn to glitter fully and other ears to do more sparingly, so your arrangement doesn’t go overboard. For the former, coat fully with craft glue and glitter. For the latter, use a foam brush to lightly dab some kernels with craft glue, then apply glitter. 

To soften husks so you can shape the ears when you arrange them, steam over a kettle of boiling water once the glitter has set. Gourds need nothing more than a glittered stem to shine.

To me, mints are an essential part of any dinner party.  They taste good, they aid in digestion, and they freshen your mouth which makes for sweeter post-dinner conversation.  This recipe for Bavarian Mints by kitchenchatter sounds like the perfect mint for our Thanksgiving festivities.

DISCLAIMER:  The above photo is for a similar recipe for Bavarian Mints, but it does not go along with this recipe. ~ Softa123

Bavarian Mints

==============

By kitchenchatter

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 5 minutes

Total time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

12 ounces package semi-sweet chocolate chips

12 ounces package milk chocolate chips

1 tablespoon butter

14 ounces can Eagle-Brand-sweetened-condensed milk

3 drops oil of peppermint

1 teaspoon vanilla

Directions:

Melt in top of double boiler. the chips and butter. Remove from heat- add sweetened milk, oil of peppermint and vanilla. Pour into 9×13-inch pan. Cool and cut.

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APPLES APPLES APPLES

Posted on November 8, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Autumn, Chocolate, Dairy, Desserts, Family, Fun, Halloween Recipes, Halloween Snacks, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Nuts, Pies, Pineapple, Quotes, Recipes, Rochester, Salad, Side Dish, Snacks, Tried and True Recipe, U.S. Politics, Vegetables | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


I got up EARLY this morning and decided to stay up so that I could blog today.   It’s been a hectic week and last week was the same.  I’ve never had so many doctor appointments at one time!   So, while I’m up, I will do what I love and that is the blog.

I‘ve been thinking about apples all week and decided that I would write about them, especially the candied apples that I used to love to eat and the caramel apples that my sister and I would make with my mom.  I always loved doing that.

The apple does not fall far from the tree.

Years ago my friend, Susie, asked me to find her a recipe for the candied apples.   Thanks to Prodigy and my first computer, I was able to find a recipe for her.  I miss the old days of Prodigy and their Food Boards.  And, a few years ago, I attended the wedding of a computer friend of mine and they made candied (or bought) and caramel apples as favors.  I thought that that was ingenious since it was an October wedding!

The wonderful bounty of Fall.

Apples form a part of a healthy food plan.  Remember the saying, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away?”  I don’t know if that is true of not but “Apples have properties that no other fruits have and its benefits have been proven overtime. You will be able to get the benefits of these properties individually with other fruits, but an apple combines everything and makes it simpler,” according to an article posted at Succeed With This.”  According to this article there are 9 reasons why an apple a day keeps the doctor away.  Here are the reasons:

  1. Apple contains Vitamin C. Vitamin C helps greatly your immune system.
  2. Prevent Heart Diseases. The reason it can prevent both coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease is because apples are rich in flavonoid. Flavonoids are also known for their antioxidant effects.
  3. Low in calories.
  4. Prevent Cancers. Notice the plural. We all know that cancer comes in several forms and in different places. Apples target multiple cancers such as colon cancerprostate cancer and breast cancer in women.
  5. Apples contain phenols, which have a double effect on cholesterol. It reduces bad cholesterol and increases good cholesterol.
  6. Prevents tooth decay.
  7. Protects your brain from brain disease.
  8. Healthier Lungs. A research at the University of Nottingham Research shows that people who eat 5 apples or more per week has lower respiratory problems, including asthma.
  9. They taste great!

Apple's are G-d's work of art.

All of the above are good reasons and I’m going to eat an apple right after I finish blogging!  My favorite apple is the Ambrosia which is difficult to find.  I first tasted them last year as Sam’s Club sold them.  I ate apples and couldn’t get enough.  I even took them to Myrtle Beach last year so I could eat them there.  So far this year, I haven’t found them.  My next favorite is the Empire.  Living in Rochester, we can find a good variety of apples as there are many apple orchards around our area of the world.  I used to love to go apple picking with my step-son, his wife and his two children, my grandchildren!  The kids would help their “old” Softa pick the apples and Scott would carry the filled bushel for me and he would help me on and off the cart.  Now, I can’t get on and off the cart very easily so they don’t call me to go apple picking with them.  I miss that a lot.

I use a recipe software program to store my recipes.  It is called “Home Cookin” and it is from Mountain Software.  When I set up the chapters, I dedicated one to Apple Recipes.  No other single ingredient has its own chapter.

So, today’s recipes are all include apples and I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!

What's not to love about an apple?

 

Apple Bliss Bars

================

Crust:

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1 stick (1/2 cup) margarine

2 1/2 cups chopped apples

1/2 cup sugar mixed with 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Topping:

3 eggs

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 cup brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup nuts (optional)

Mix together flour, sugar and margarine until crumbly and press into an ungreased 9 x 13-inch pan.

Sprinkle chopped apples over crust. Sprinkle sugar-cinnamon mixture over apples. Bake at 375 degrees F for 30 minutes.

Remove from oven and pour topping over apples. Return to oven and bake about 20 minutes more.

Topping:

3 eggs

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 cup brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup nuts (optional)

Mix all together and pour over partially-baked apples and crust.

Why not upset the apple cart? If you don't, the apples will rot anyway. ~Frank Howard Clark

Baked Beans ‘n Apples

===============================

6 slices Bacon, diced*

1/2 cup Chopped Onion (1 medium onion)

2 cans Brick Oven Baked Bean**

1/4 cup Firmly packed Brown Sugar

1 teaspoon Ginger

2 tablespoons Molasses

2 Apples; each cut into 16 thin wedges

*NOTE: For those of you who keep Kosher, as I do, I use Beef Frye when making this recipe.

**Ingredient List should read: 2 (16-ounce) cans brick oven baked beans. Again, for those of you who keep Kosher, I use Heinz Vegetarian Baked Beans.

In large skillet, fry bacon until partially cooked. Drain, reserving 2 tablespoons of the drippings. Stir in remaining ingredients. Cover. Simmer until thoroughly heated and apple is tender. At this point, I usually put everything into a GREASED, COVERED casserole and bake at 350° Fahrenheit for maybe a half an hour, checking to make sure it doesn’t dry out.

Makes 8 (1/2-cup) servings.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:  1/2 cup = 1 serving

Calories 210

Protein 8g

Carbohydrates 39g

Fat 3g

Sodium 425mg

Potassium 395mg

TIP:  To bake in oven, heat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.  Reserve apple slices for topping.  Pour beans into a GREASED 1 1/2 to 2 quart casserole and top with sliced apples.  Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 35-45 minutes OR until bubbly and THOROUGHLY heated.

I make this for BBQ Brings A Dish To Pass party.  Everyone raves about it, especially my husband and my father.  I have been making this recipe for years, but have never tasted it myself as I don’t like baked beans!  My Mom now uses this recipe, but makes hers without any meat.

Those who have tasted it with the meat like it better with the beef frye (or bacon).  I add molasses at the request of my husband and he tells me it’s better with the molasses. I use maybe 2 tablespoons of the molasses.  I first made this recipe for our Nosheri Too group, a singles group I started before Paul and I got married.

This recipe originally came from one of my Pillsbury cookbooks.

~Softa123 aka Marilyn

Apple Strudel is a heavenly delight.

DISCLAIMER:  This photo of a delicious looking slice of strudel is not the photo for the following strudel recipe.  I found this photo on the Internet. ~Softa123

Rachael’s And Softa’s Apple Walnut Strudel

========================================

2 Apples

1/3 cup Walnuts; chopped

1/4 teaspoon Lemon Juice; (NOTE: I used more so apples wouldn’t turn brown)

1/4 cup Margarine

1/8 cup Sugar

1/2 teaspoon Ground Cloves

1/2 teaspoon Cinnamon

1/3 pound Phyllo Leaves (6 leaves)

Bread Crumbs

Egg Wash (Beaten Egg and Water)

Cinnamon-Sugar

Peel, core and chop apples. Combine apples, walnuts, lemon juice, sugar, cinnamon and cloves in a mixing bowl; fold to mix.

Melt margarine.

Place 1 phyllo dough leaf on a lightly dampened, lightly bread-crumbed cloth. Brush leaf lightly with melted margarine. Place a second leaf on top of first leaf. Brush lightly with melted margarine. Repeat with a third leaf.

Place half of apple filling 2″ in from long edges. Fold long edges in over the filling. Fold over the ends. Roll up dough jelly-roll fashion.

Score top of roll into 10 pieces with a sharp knife or scissors and place on GREASED cookie sheet. Repeat with next 3 leaves. Bake at 350 degrees F. for 25 mins. OR until lightly browned.

Makes 18-20 pieces of strudel.

Note: A package of phyllo dough will make approximately 4-5 rolls. I made this recipe up for Rosh Hashanah 2002. It is based upon a recipe I found on the internet, but I greatly changed it. It is easy, fast, and delicious. Rachael did the first two rolls and mixed up the first batch just about by herself at age 6 1/2. We were both very proud of her! I hope this will be a new tradition for us! ~Marilyn aka Softa123

Servings: 18

Every so often we need to turn everything upside down so we can see a new perspective of our life and our world. ~Marilyn Sultar

DISCLAIMER:  This photo of Topsy Turvy Apple Pecan Pie  is not the photo for the following strudel recipe.  I found this photo on the Internet. ~Softa123

Topsy Turvy Apple Pecan Pie

===========================

1/4 cup Softened Butter or Margarine

1/2 cup Pecan Halves

2/3 cup Firmly Packed Brown Sugar

Pastry for 2-Crust Pie

6 cups Sliced Tart Apples (about 2 1/2 lbs.).

2 tablespoons Lemon Juice

1 tablespoon Flour

1/2 cup Sugar

1/2 teaspoon Cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon Nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon Salt

Spread softened butter evenly on bottom and sides of 9″ pie pan. Press pecan halves, rounded side down, into butter. Pat brown sugar evenly over pecans. Roll out enough pastry for 1 crust; place in pie pan over sugar; trim, leaving 1/2″ overhang. Combine remaining ingredients; pour into pie pan, keeping top level. Top with remaining pastry; trim even with bottom crust; fold edges together, flush with rim; flute.

Prick top of pie with fork. Bake in hot oven, 450 degrees, 10 mins.; reduce heat to moderate, 350 degrees; bake 30-45 minutes or longer, or until apples are tender. Remove from oven. When syrup in pan stops bubbling, place serving plate over pie; invert. Carefully remove pie pan.  SERVE HOT.

I have not made this recipe yet. It sounds great for Thanksgiving. It came from one of the Rochester newspapers, years ago when we had two newspapers.

~Softa123 aka Marilyn

If you want apples, you have to shake the trees.

Caramel Apple Salad

===================

4 apples, cored and diced

16 ounces crushed pineapple with juice

1/2 cup chopped dry-roasted peanuts

1 package butterscotch instant pudding, fat free, sugar free

1 tub fat free Cool Whip

Combine all ingredients.

Servings: 12

Some like it hot, some do not.

Fire Red Candy Apples Recipe

============================

Submitted by RecipeTips.com

“These bright red apples would surely catch the eye of all the kids at your next Halloween party. Serve theses yummy treats and be the first to welcome in the Fall season.”

Ingredients

8 medium apples, green or red

2-3/4 cups sugar

1-1/4 cups light corn syrup

1-1/2 cups water

1 teaspoon vanilla

15 drops red food coloring

Serving Description: 1 apple

Servings: 8

Equipment: medium heavy sauce pan

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

Directions

Wash and dry apples, remove stems and insert a wooden stick into the bottom (not stem end) of the apples; approximately 2/3 of the way into the apple. Set apples aside. In saucepan, combine sugar, corn syrup, and water. Heat slowly on low heat, stirring constantly. Once mixture starts to boil, stop stirring and leave boiling until candy mixture reaches 300°F on a candy thermometer, or until a small amount of mixture dropped into cold water separates into breakable threads.

Remove from heat and stir in food coloring. Wait until mixture stops bubbling, then add vanilla, mix well.

Dip each apple into the mixture while mixture is still hot, swirl to cover apple evenly. You will need to work fast to get all the apples dipped before mixture becomes too hard.

Place dipped apple on greased cookie sheet or greased wax paper.

Sugar in the morning, sugar in the evening, sugar at supper time...

Halloween Candy Apples 2

========================

By Chef Dee

Added October 01, 2004 | Recipe #101064

Categories: Candy Dessert Apples More

Photo by brian48195

Total Time: 1 hrs 34 mins

Prep Time: 10 mins

Cook Time: 1 hrs 24 mins

Chef Dee’s Note: We make these every Halloween.

Ingredients:

8 apples, firm and medium sized

8 wooden sticks

3 cups granulated sugar

1/2 cup light corn syrup

1 cup water

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon red food coloring

Directions:

1 Wash, dry and polish apples.

2 Remove stem.

3 Insert wooden stick in stem end.

4 Remove blossoms.  (SOFTA123’S NOTE:  I really am unsure what this means, but my guess is that if there are blossoms or leaves on the apples, take them off before you begin making this recipe.)

5 Set aside.

6 Put sugar, syrup and water into saucepan.

7 Heat and stir to dissolve.

8 Boil without stirring until it reaches 300 degrees on candy thermometer.

9 A bit of syrup dropped into cold water will separate into brittle threads.

10 Remove from heat.

11 Stir in cinnamon and food coloring.

12 Dip apple to cover.

13 Hold above saucepan to drain.

14 Place on greased pan or tray stick side up.

15 Quickly dip remaining apples.

16 Return syrup to heat long enough to liquefy if it firms too much.

17 Let stand at least 1 hour before serving.

By Michelle_My_Belle on October 29, 2010

Very easy to make, and using the leftovers to make hard candy was a great idea! I added some extra cinnamon with the food coloring at the end to brighten up the flavor after cooking so long.

By brian48195 on November 08, 2009

These were easy to make. It takes longer for the temperature to reach 300 because you have to wait for the water to boil off. So, don’t worry that it isn’t going as fast as you think. Also, use a small pot so the liquid is deeper. I also did what another reviewer suggested and sprinkled a cookie sheet with sugar to set the apples on. I also took the left over candy and poured it into little tart pans and made candy discs. I will make this recipe again. Thanks for sharing.

By KennKonn on October 23, 2009

This is very very close to my mom’s recipe that she has been making every Halloween for 40 years. She sprinkles white sugar on the cookie sheets then sets the candied apples on that. They don’t stick to the pans and they have a sugary bottom that hardens and makes it easier to wrap in plastic wrap. I prefer the candy to the candy apples anymore.  There isn’t many kids left at home anymore but on Halloween all the past kids come knocking on the door. It wouldn’t be Halloween without her candy apples.

Nutritional Facts for Halloween Candy Apples

Serving Size: 1 (309 g)

Servings Per Recipe: 8

Amount Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 422.5 Calories from Fat

296%Total Fat 0.2 g0%Saturated Fat 0.0 g0%Cholesterol 0.0 mg0%Sodium

15.2 mg0%Total Carbohydrate 110.4 g36%Dietary Fiber 3.3 g13%Sugars 94.9

g379%Protein 0.3 g0%

From Recipe.com™ http://www.Recipe.com

It's yummy, yummy in my tummy and it feels oh so good...

Candy Bar Caramel Apple

=======================

These apples are dipped in fudgy caramel and then into your favorite chopped candy bar. What a treat!

20 min. Prep time

2 :20 Total time

8 caramel apples

8 wooden craft sticks

8 large apples, washed, dried

1 cup chopped your favorite chocolate-covered candy bars

1/4 cup Land O Lakes® Butter

1/4 cup milk

1 (11-ounce) bag caramel bits*

1 cup milk chocolate & caramel swirled baking chips**

2 (1-ounce) squares white baking chocolate, melted

Insert 1 wooden stick into stem end of each apple; set aside. Line baking sheet with waxed paper; spray with no-stick cooking spray. Set aside. Place chopped candy into medium bowl; set aside.

Combine butter, milk and caramel bits in 3-quart saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until caramel is melted and smooth (5 to 7 minutes). Remove from heat; stir in baking chips until smooth.

Place pan over low heat; dip apples into melted caramel mixture until evenly coated, spooning mixture over apples as needed. Shake gently to allow all excess caramel mixture to drip off. Roll bottoms of apples into chopped candy. Place onto prepared baking sheet.

Drizzle each apple with melted white chocolate. If necessary, lift each apple from waxed paper and press caramel and chopped candy back onto bottom of apples. Place back onto waxed paper.

Refrigerate at least 1 hour. Wrap each apple in waxed paper; store refrigerated. Let stand at room temperature 1 hour before serving.

*Substitute 45 caramels, unwrapped.

**Substitute 1 cup milk chocolate chips.

– Make sure to allow all excess caramel mixture to drip off into pan.

– Wrap 2 colors of festive ribbon around wooden sticks for a special touch. Tie at ends to secure.

– Wooden craft sticks are available in craft stores or you can check in the produce section for caramel apple sticks.

– Leftover caramel sauce can be re-heated and served over ice cream.

Calories: 520

Fat: 23g

Cholesterol: 25mg

Sodium: 220mg

Carbohydrates: 77g

Dietary Fiber: 4g

Protein: 6g

This recipe was reprinted from landolakes.com.

http://www.landolakes.com/recipe/1641

PLEASE DON’T FORGET TO VOTE TODAY!

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HALLOWEEN FUN #6

Posted on October 21, 2011. Filed under: Autumn, Candy, Cheese, Comfort Foods, Dairy, Desserts, Dinner/Supper, Fudge, Ghost Stories, Halloween, Halloween Recipes, Kosher Recipe, Meat, My Ramblings, Recipes, Rochester, Snacks, Stew, Vegetables | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


So, what else do we need for a ghostly themed Halloween party?  What else!  Ghost stories, especially if you have a fireplace and know how to use it!  Before I put the stories from the internet on, or the links, I have to tell you a favorite Halloween memory of mine.

Autumn at The Genesee Country Village

There is a great restored 19th-century village in Mumford, New York which is about 40 miles from my house.  It is called “The Genesee Country Village and Museum.”  When we first moved into our house we took out yearly memberships to the Museum and every year they would have a Halloween themed day.  I think it was our second year in the house; we invited some friends of ours with kids to join us for a fun-filled day at the Genesee Country Museum.  In total, there were 14 of us.  They kids had a ball and we adults had one watching them.  They were allowed to go trick or treating within the museum, thus giving them a head start on everyone who didn’t go to the Museum.  Oh, everyone had to wear costumes, including adults, if they wanted a treat.  Then they had set up in a large barn structure, bobbing for apples and donuts on a string.  You could buy a pumpkin there for the kids to paint.  Every so often you would see the headless horseman go by.  Then they had a ghost story time.  This was done in the school house, if I remember correctly.  Anyhow, they told a story about a woodcutter whose wife had died and he remarried.  His kids were very afraid of their step-mother and they had heard tales that she would take children into the woods, kill them and then she would chop up them up and cook them in a stew and call it “veal” stew.  If anyone recognizes this story and can tell it better, please email me or post a reply to this article!  Anyhow, you get the picture.  I laughed to myself as I had invited everyone back to our house for dinner.  Everyone knew I was a step-mother.  And guess what I had cooking in my crock pot for dinner that night!…Veal Stew!…I thought it would be perfect for a chilly autumn day and when I got home I thought it was perfect in light of the ghost story we had all heard…not one of the kids touched it!  LOL…I forgot what I served them instead.  I probably served hot dogs.  But even the kids who knew me best, Fernando and Nicholas, would not touch it!  LOL!  Please share your Halloween stories with us!  Just reply to this post!

Trick or Treats at the Genesee Country Village

The most famous ghost story in our area is The White Lady.  I saw her just once when I was in my 20s and my two best friends at that time, Estelle and Joyce, and I were driving to Sodus Point to go bar-hopping.  I was driving.  When we reached the Durand Eastman Park area, I slammed on the bricks as I thought I saw something cross the path of the car and look at us.  I told the girls what I had seen.  They saw it too.  I had never heard the legend at that point, so Joyce told Estelle and I that it was The White Lady and she told us the tale.  Here is a version of it that I found on the internet that sounds like the tale I was told that night.   I am working on illustrating a version of “The Headless Horseman” that I found on the internet.  When I am finished, I will post it as a downloadable file for you.  I will also put some links to other ghost stories that I found that I thought were good for your enjoyment and at the end of those, I will post some Halloween fudge recipes because I am craving some fudge!  Of course, I will also post my recipe for veal stew!

White Lady

A New York Ghost Story

retold by  S. E. Schlosser

In the early 1800s, the White Lady and her daughter were supposed to have lived on the land where the Durand Eastman Park — part of Irondequoit and Rochester — now stands. One day, the daughter disappeared. Convinced that the girl had been raped and murdered by a local farmer, the mother searched the marshy lands day after day, trying to discover where her child’s body was buried. She took with her two German shepherd dogs to aid in her search, but she never found a trace of her daughter. Finally, in her grief, the mother threw herself off a cliff into Lake Ontario and died. Her dogs pined for their mistress and shortly joined her in the grave.

After death, the mother’s spirit returned to continue the search for her child. People say that on foggy nights, the White Lady rises from the small Durand Lake which faces Lake Ontario. She is accompanied by her dogs and together they roam through the Durand Eastman Park, still searching for her missing daughter.

The White Lady is not a friendly spirit. She dislikes men and often seeks vengeance against the males visiting the park on her daughter’s behalf. There have been reports of the White Lady chasing men into the lake, shaking their cars, and making their lives miserable until they leave the park. She has never touched any females accompanying these unfortunate fellows.

SOFTA123’S NOTE:  I hadn’t heard about the dogs.  That is interesting.   I didn’t see any dogs, just The White Lady.

Source:  http://americanfolklore.net/  – I suggest going there for more great ghost tales!  Very comprehensive website for ghost stories!

Other Links for Ghost Stores: 

http://www.ghoststories.ws/

http://themoonlitroad.com/

http://theshadowlands.net/ghost/

http://www.halloweenishere.com/ghost_stories.html

http://www.horrormasters.com/

Double, Double Toil and Trouble! Bubble Bubble, Stew Bubble!

Mom’s and Marilyn’s Stew

=========================

Course | Main Meals

Serves:  6

Ingredients:

1 cup Heinz Tomato Ketchup

1 pound Baby Carrots

3 large stalks of Celery

4 medium Parsnips

4 medium Onions

6 large Potatoes

3 drops Tabasco Sauce

3 drops Hot Pepper Sauce

2 drops Worcestershire Sauce

2 Bay Leaves (SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  2 large Bay Leaves.  After the stew is cooked discard the bay leaves before serving.)

2 cups Frozen Green Peas

2 medium Green Peppers

3 pounds uncooked cubed Lean Beef OR Veal

1/8 cup wine

Instructions:

Wash, peel and cut up all veggies except peas and green peppers (Cut the veggies about same size as your stew meat). Place in soup pot. Add cubed beef (stew meat) to soup pot.   Add the bay leaves.

In a 12 ounce glass, put 1 cup of Ketchup, a few dashes of Tabasco Sauce and a few dashes of Hot Sauce. If you like, add a splash of wine (or up to 1/8 cup). Fill rest of glass to almost top with water. Stir then pour over everything in pot.

Bring to a boil then cook on low for at least 2 hours covered. Add green peas and green peppers last 1/2 hr. of cooking.

SOFTA123’S AKA MARILY’S NOTES:

I’ve been making this recipe since I was 8 years old and it’s a family favorite and original from my Mom. You can use veal stew meat instead of beef if you wish, which is my Halloween Dinner tradition which has a great story behind it.  (The story I just told you.)

Halloween Fudge

===============

For an easy spin on a Halloween-theme, this yummy cream cheese and white Chocolate fudge is tinted pumpkin-orange.

1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened

1 (16-ounce) package powdered sugar (about 4 cups)

1 (12-ounce) package white chocolate chips, melted

1 cup toasted chopped nuts

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

8 drops yellow food coloring

4 drops red food coloring

Line an 8-inch square pan with foil, grease with butter; set aside. In a large bowl, beat cream cheese with electric mixer on medium speed until creamy. Gradually add sugar, beating until well blended after each addition. Add melted white chocolate, nuts, vanilla and food colorings; mix well. Spread into prepared pan. Refrigerate 1 hour or until firm.

Cut into 48 squares. Makes 24 servings.

Halloween Gravel Fudge Candy

Halloween Gravel (Fudge Candy)

==============================

By NorthwestGal on September 07, 2008

Photo by SweetsLady

Prep Time: 30 mins

Total Time: 2 hrs 30 mins

Serves: 80, Yield: 2.25 pounds

About This Recipe

“I got this recipe from the Better Homes and Gardens website. I placed the fudge “rock” candies in a crystal centerpiece, and then scattered a few pastic Spiders for a quick Halloween decoration. I didn’t eat the candy myself, but my kids said they were pretty good (and they were gone in a matter of hours, so they must have been pretty good). Even if you don’t eat them, these are a handy treat to use for enhancing your Halloween decorating.

Cooking time includes Minimum chilling time.

The recipe makes about 2 1/4 pounds of candy, or about 80 rock-shaped fudge candies.”

Ingredients:

3 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips

14 ounces sweetened condensed milk

2 tablespoons butter

1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla

1 dash salt

2 cups miniature marshmallows

1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa, power ( for coating)

1/2 cup powdered sugar ( for coating)

1 -2 cup crushed chocolate cookies (optional)

Directions:

Line a 9×9-inch pan with foil; set aside.

In a medium saucepan, stir chips, canned milk, butter, vanilla and salt together over medium heat until melted. Remove pan from heat; stir in marshmallows just until blended. Spread mixture in foiled pan. With a thin metal spatula, swirl marshmallows through fudge until marshmallows are mostly melted. Cover and chill about 2 hours or until firm.

After adequately chilled, scoop pieces of fudge with a small spoon and shape into small rocks. (The fudge will be sticky). Roll some of the fudge “rocks” in cocoa powder mixture and some in powdered sugar and store rock candy in airtight container for up to 3 days.

For a spooky graveyard scene, spread chocolate cookie crumbs on a platter. Arrange the rock candy on top, to resemble rocks in soil.

Nutrition Facts Serving Size: 1 (14 g) Servings Per Recipe: 80

Amount Per Serving% Daily Value

Calories 57.0 Calories from Fat 2442%Amount Per Serving% Daily Value Total Fat 2.6g4%Saturated Fat 1.6g8%Cholesterol 4mg0%Sugars 7.6g Sodium 12.1mg0%Total Carbohydrate 8.7g2%Dietary Fiber 0.5g2%Sugars 7.6 g30%Protein 0.7g1%

Halloween Layered Fudge

Halloween Layered Fudge

=======================

Here’s an easy and foolproof fudge recipe that screams “Halloween!” thanks to the brown and orange colors. You can also try making the fudge with mango flavoring.—Taste of Home Test Kitchen

64 Servings

Prep: 15 min. + chilling

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon butter

2 cups (12 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips

1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk, divided

8 ounces white candy coating

1/4 teaspoon orange extract

2 to 4 drops orange paste food coloring

Directions:

Line an 8-in. square pan with foil; butter foil and set aside. In a microwave-safe bowl, heat chocolate chips and 1 cup milk on high for 30 seconds; stir. Repeat until mixture is smooth. Pour into prepared pan. Chill for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a microwave-safe bowl, melt candy coating with remaining milk; stir until smooth. Stir in extract and food coloring. Spread over chocolate layer. Chill for 1 hour or until firm.

Using foil, remove fudge from pan. Cut into 1-in. squares.

Yield: about 2 pounds.

This recipe was tested in a 1,100-watt microwave.

SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  I would use a couple of drops of Orange Candy Oil for the flavoring instead of Orange Extract.

 

Pumpkin Fudge

=============

Submitted By: Ginger

Photo By: angelaBBf

Servings: 36

“Using the same method as is used in making traditional fudge, pumpkin is substituted for chocolate in this seasonal recipe for a corn syrup based treat.”

INGREDIENTS:

3 cups white sugar

1 cup milk

3 tablespoons light corn syrup

1/2 cup pumpkin puree

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/2 cup butter

1/2 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

DIRECTIONS:

Butter or grease one 8×8 inch pan.

In a 3 quart saucepan, mix together sugar, milk, corn syrup, pumpkin and salt. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium and continue boiling. Do not stir.

When mixture registers 232 degrees F (110 degrees C) on candy  thermometer, or forms a soft ball when dropped into cold water, remove pan from heat. Stir in pumpkin pie spice, vanilla, butter and nuts.

Cool to lukewarm (110 degrees F or 43 degrees C on candy thermometer).

Beat mixture until it is very thick and loses some of its gloss.

Quickly pour into a greased eight-inch pan. When firm cut into 36 squares.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 36 Calories: 108 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 3.8g Cholesterol: 7mg Sodium: 46mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 18.8g Dietary Fiber: 0.2g Protein: 0.5g

Pumpkin Fudge 2

===============

3 cups sugar

3/4 cup butter

1 can evaporated milk (2/3 cup) (5-1/3-ounce)

1/2 cup canned pumpkin

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 package butterscotch-flavored pieces (12-ounce) (2 cups)

1 jar marshmallow creme (7-ounce)

1 cup chopped pecans

1 teaspoon vanilla

Butter a 13x9x2-inch baking pan. In a heavy 2-quart saucepan, combine sugar, butter, evaporated milk, pumpkin, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg.

Bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Reduce heat. Boil over medium-low heat till mixture registers 234° (soft-ball stage) on a candy thermometer, stirring constantly (should take about 25 minutes).

Remove from heat and stir in butterscotch pieces till melted. Add marshmallow creme, nuts and vanilla. Mix till well combined. Pour mixture into prepared pan, spreading evenly. Cool at room temperature.

Cut into squares. Wrap tightly and store in refrigerator.

Makes 3 1/4pounds.

Now this sounds boolicious!

Spooky Fudge Treats Recipe

==========================

Ready in: 2-5 hrs

Difficulty: 2 (1=easiest : hardest=5)

Serves/Makes: 36

INGREDIENTS:

18 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips

1 can (14 ounce size) sweetened condensed milk

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

**Topping***

Flaked coconut

Sprinkles

Assorted candies

PREPARATION:

In heavy saucepan, over low heat, melt chips with sweetened condensed milk. Remove from heat; stir in vanilla.

Chill 2 hours or until firm. Roll into balls or Halloween shapes and decorate. Chill 1 hour or until firm. Store tightly covered.

For Pumpkin: Roll fudge in orange sprinkles, carve out face designs. Use green jelly candy for leaves.

For Cool Cat: Use taffy cut into triangles for ears. Red hot candies for eyes and nose. Sprinkles for mouth. Finish with licorice pieces for whiskers.

For Scary Ghost: Roll fudge in flaked white coconut. Add candy eyes.

For Spider: Roll big and smaller pieces of fudge into body/head shapes. Add red hots for eyes and mouth. Use licorice pieces for legs. Top with sprinkles on head and body.

NUTRITION: 104 calories, 5 grams fat, 15 grams carbohydrates, 1 grams protein per treat.

This recipe is low in sodium.

makes 36

Recipe ID: 65368

SUBMITTED BY: f1sh1962

Servings: 36

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FOR THE LOVE OF BALLOONS

Posted on September 3, 2011. Filed under: Balloon Crafts, Balloons, Candy, Chocolate, Dean Jones, Desserts, Fun, General Crafts, Jane Fonda, Jason Robards, Kids, Movies, Party Ideas, PLAY, Recipes, Uncategorized, Winnie the Pooh | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


 I must have always loved balloons, but I never realized how much until I saw the movie “Any Wednesday,” starring Jane Fonda (who I love as an actress and was devastated by her politics) and Jason Robards.  One review I saw described the movie as:

“Broadway hit about a married millionaire’s mistress befriended by his unsuspecting wife and cooed over by a loyal associate. Lots of slamming doors, comical deception, hissy fits and balloons…” (By moonspinner55 found at http://www.imdb.com).

"ANY WEDNESDAY"

 Unlike moonspinner55, I loved the movie.  And the scene where Jane walks into her apartment and finds it filled with balloons has always stuck with me.  It is a dream of mine to one day come home and find that someone I love has filled a room with balloons for me.

Thinking about balloons, I thought, why not write a post about them, so that’s what you are going to read about here today.

Winnie the Pooh says, “Nobody can be uncheered with a balloon.”  I think that Winnie is 100 percent correct.  We like to decorate our parties and events with balloons.  We take balloons when we visit someone who is ill to try to cheer them up a bit.  Many times someone will bring a balloon(s) to a friend or relative who is celebrating a birthday or an anniversary.  People give loved ones balloons on Valentine’s Day.  They are also appropriate for Mother’s Day and Father’s Day.  When someone in your workplace gets promoted, balloons are an inexpensive, thoughtful way to say, “Congratulations.”  And don’t forget to give a balloon(s) to a brand new Mom, Dad or Baby!  Balloons are really a go-to gift for most occasions!  I remember giving each of my grandchildren a bunch of colorful balloons for their first birthdays.  I began doing that with my eldest grandson, Marc.  He loved the balloons so much that I made it a tradition that continued with my granddaughter, Rachael, and my youngest grandson, Joshua.

Up, Up and Away

Another dream of mine is to go up in a hot air balloon.  I think they are so gorgeous and I think it would be an exciting and relaxing way to see a special place such as Letchworth State Park in Castile, New York or go over the Ocean in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  I’d make sure to take my husband, a picnic lunch and champagne with me!  Would I be scared?  Yeah, a little bit.  But I would still like to go in one.

You can do easy craft projects using balloons and other inexpensive supplies like home-made paste, string, newspaper strips, comic strips or tissue paper.

String Ball Craft

Difficulty:  Easy and a Great Craft To Do With Kids

Supplies:

String, yarn or thread

Round balloons

Flour

Instructions:

  1. Make a wheat paste by mixing  3 parts water with 2 parts flour in a pot. Heat to a boil, whisking occasionally to remove lumps. After the paste boils, allow it to cool.
  1. Blow up a balloon of the appropriate size for each ball you want to make.
  1. Dip string or yarn in the cooled paste and then wrap it around the balloons. Go around many times, in different directions, until you have covered the basic shape of the balloon, but be sure to leave gaps if you want to make a see-through string ball.
  1. Allow the string to dry thoroughly; approximately 24 hours.
  1.  Pop the balloons if you want to get them out right away, or wait for them to shrink gradually on their own. When the balloons are gone, you should be left with a see-through string ball.

Hints:

  1. For more exciting string balls, interweave different colors or types of yarn or string. You can also add paint or glitter to the paste mixture, decorate the finished balls more or put small items inside the balloons before you blow them up, which will end up trapped in the balls (as long as the holes in the string layer are small enough).
  1. These string balls are not water-resistant, so they’re probably more of an indoor toy. The paste is nontoxic but will definitely dissolve if wet.

Make small and medium balls of different colors and hang your finished ball(s) from the ceiling with different lengths of string, yarn or curling ribbon to use as party decorations.

Make small balls using gold and red and/or gold and green colors to decorate your Christmas tree, or to use in a table centerpiece.

Make small balls using dark or royal blue and silver string, yarn or thread to hang from the ceiling as above, or to use as part of a table centerpiece for Chanukah.

For Easter, make the balls in pastel colors, for Valentine’s Day make pink and/or red balls to decorate and perhaps put a special note inside for your beloved.

If you like glitter, add glitter!  Use more than one color for a rainbow effect.  There are countless ways to use this craft.  Let your imagination soar!

Another craft that is similar to the string balls is making Piñatas.

I found this great Piñata project at Make Pinatas.com.  This is a good resource for children’s party ideas.

How to Make a Hot Air Balloon Piñata 
This hot-air balloon piñata is great for first time makers and it makes for a nice big target for little kids.

 

Materials:

Papier-Mâché Paste*
• 14-inch balloon, inflated

• 10-inch bowl
• One batch papier-mâché paste
• 1 two-page spread each of regular newspaper and the comic pages
• 32-oz. plastic yogurt container, cut in half horizontally
• String
• Hole punch
• Glue stick
• 5 sheets of tissue paper in bright colors, cut
• into 3 1/2-inch squares
• 4 lbs. of individually wrapped candies

*To make Papié-Maché Paste, combine 1/2 cup all-purpose flour and 2 cups cold water in a bowl.

Add this mixture to a saucepan of 2 cups boiling water and bring it to a boil again.  Remove from the heat and stir in 3 tablespoons of sugar. Let it cool; it will thicken as it cools. Once it does, it’s ready to use.

Directions:

 Step 1:  For stability while working, place the balloon in a 10-inch bowl. Fold the spread of newspaper in half and then in half again. Tear (don’t cut) 1 1/2-inch-wide strips so they have a slightly rough edge (tearing along a straight edge works well). The rough edges help make a smooth overall surface. Drag a strip of newspaper through the papier-mâché paste, wipe off any excess with your fingers, and place it at an angle on the balloon. Place the second strip so that it slightly overlaps the first. Continue until the balloon has been covered with one layer of paper strips–except for a 2-inch square at the top, through which the candy will go. Give the papier-mâché up to 24 hours to dry. Cover your leftover paste with plastic wrap so it doesn’t dry out (if it does, add warm water).
Step 2:   For the piñata’s hanger, wrap the midpoint of a length of string (doubled up, if necessary) around the bottom of the balloon, pulling the ends up to the top; tape it to the balloon in a few places. Knot together the ends of the string 6 inches above the top. Tape the top half of the yogurt container to the bottom of the balloon. This will become the neck of the hot air balloon.

Step 3:   Cover the balloon (including the string), the neck and the bottom half of the yogurt container (which will become the hot air balloon basket) with a layer of strips of comics, placing them at a different angle from the first layer. (Using different colored strips lets you distinguish one layer from the next, ensuring a uniform overall thickness.) Allow the second layer to dry.

Step 4:  Cover the balloon, neck and basket with strips of plain newsprint going in a third direction. Smooth over any rough edges as you work. Allow the balloon to dry thoroughly.

Step 5:  Punch four holes into the neck of the hot air balloon and four into the basket. Attach string to the neck about 3 1/2 inches from the base of the balloon to later suspend the basket.

Step 6:  
Dot the corners of a tissue square with a glue stick and place it just to the side of the 2-inch square on the top of the balloon. Follow with other squares in the same color, working your way diagonally down around the balloon. When you get to the bottom, start at the top again in another color, fitting the squares into a hound’s-tooth pattern. If you want to add streamers, cut 2- by 30-inch lengths of tissue paper and glue them onto matching colored squares about halfway down.

Step 7:  Cover the basket with squares of tissue in different colors. Attach the basket to the balloon. Puncture the uncovered part of the balloon at the top of the piñata and remove all of the balloon fragments. Make sure the inside of the piñata is completely dry before you fill it, so the candy won’t stick to the sides. Fill it about halfway with the candy. Cover the opening with some tissue squares, and your piñata is ready to hang.

My very favorite balloon craft involves chocolate…. wouldn’t you know it!   I’ve known about this craft for years and it’s on my must try list.  I just think that this is so classy that your company, young or old, will be talking about these for years to come, making you one savvy host/hostess.    The directions for this project was found at Chocolay.

Chocolate Bowls

Chocolate Bowls Recipe

 “This is a fun & easy project, although it can be messy! The chocolate bowls can hold all kinds of goodies including ice cream, mousse, fruit, pretzel sticks, chocolate candy, or any other treat you have in mind. You can get as creative as you want with using white chocolate that has been colored (with specially formulated coloring oils) and coordinate the theme of your party or event. We recommend making more balloons than you’ll need because chances are good that when you deflate some of the chocolate covered balloons the chocolate might fall apart for one reason or another! You can always reuse the chocolate…don’t worry!”

 

Before you begin, make sure to wash and thoroughly dry the balloons.

Ingredients:

 

 You’ll also Need:

  • Balloons (please note: some people are severely allergic to latex. Make sure that if you use latex balloons anybody eating your bowls know you used balloons to make it)
  • Bowls
  • Heavy Weight Dipping Sheets or Waxed Paper

 Tips: 

 Don’t use water balloons! They will pop. Also, water is the one thing that can really mess up chocolate!!!

  • The thicker the balloon the better.
  • Keep in mind that some people are alergic to latex.
  • If you put the chocolate balloons on waxed paper be careful about the corners of the paper curling and touching the chocolate.
  • When dipping the balloons, the longer you leave the balloon in the warm chocolate the more likely it will pop (which is a mess!!!), so dip fast & do multiple layers if you need to.

 

How To Make Chocolate Bowls:

 

1. Blow up balloons and place them in a bowl to hold them upright. Don’t blow them to be bigger than 6-8 inches tall. A lot of people like small bowls that are about the size of a coffee cup. It’s up to you. Whatever size you blow up the balloon to be will be the size of your chocolate bowl. You might want to make the balloons slightly different sizes for variety.
2. Spray each balloon (the area you’ll be putting the chocolate on) with non-stick cooking spray such as Crisco spray so that the chocolate will release easier.
3. Melt the chocolate using instructions that came with your chocolate. Ideally, use a double boiler (or a double boiler insert). Do not let the water touch the bottom of the double boiler. Only let the water simmer. Do not allow it to boil or you may burn the chocolate. If you must use a microwave, melt on medium heat for short periods being very careful not to overheat thechocolate. (Softa’s advice:  Use the microwave!!!!)
4. Let the chocolate cool for 5-10 minutes in a bowl that is sized so that you can dip your balloon into the bowl. The chocolate can’t be so hot that it will pop the balloon.

If you want to add a marbleized effect to the chocolate bowl: Pour the base color/flavor of chocolate in the bowl first. Then add a smaller quantity of a second color/flavor of chocolate on top. Swirl lightly with a knife. When you dip the balloons the bowl will look marbleized.5.There a couple of ways to make your chocolate bowls – or you can combine the methods for added flare. Either way, hold the balloon by the knot.

a. For a solid bowl that looks like flower petals: Holding the knot at a slight angle, dip the ballon in chocolate, then using the opposite angle, dip the balloon again. You may be able to do this 2-4 times. Slowly swirl the balloon around to make an even coat. Then lift the balloon slowly and let some of the excess chocolate drip back into the bowl. Sometimes the balloons will need to be dipped twice to make sure the chocolate is solid enough.

 

b. For a not solid bowl: Holding the knot, use a spoon to drizzle the chocolate over the bottom of the balloon going back and forth in one direction and then in the opposite direction. When drizzling, cover about half of the exposed balloon. Then dip the very bottom of the balloon a couple of inches into the chocolate so you have a nice, solid chocolate bottom. When doing this, you can use more than one chocolate flavor (or colored white chocolate) for added design.6.After each balloon is dipped, place on a Heavy Weight Dipping Sheet or waxed paper lined tray. The chocolate will start to settle making a flat bottom for the chocolate bowl.7.After your balloons are finished, move them to a cool area to set up (harden). Hopefully they will fit in your fridge! If so, they will set up in about 10 minutes.8.After the chocolate is completely set up, it’s time to deflate the balloons. Gently remove the chocolate covered balloon from the dipping sheet. If using waxed paper, you might need to slide a knife around the bottom edge to loosen the bottom of the chocolate bowl. Once you remove the balloon, you can use a hat pin to deflate it or cut a small hole in the top of it to deflate it. Make the hole near the area where the balloon is tied.9.As the balloon deflates it will still be attached to the inside of the chocolate. Very slowly peel the balloon away from the chocolate.10.You can add additional decorative touches by gently handling the bowl and adding more drizzled chocolate.Keep the chocolate bowls cool until you plan to use them!


Play around with these crafts and have some fun!

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THOUGHTS ABOUT BEING A BABY BOOMER

Posted on September 2, 2011. Filed under: 1960s, Baby Boomers, Candy, Chocolate, Dairy, My Ramblings, Recipes, Rochester, Tried and True Recipe, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , |


I am a true-blue, proud-of-it, bona fide Baby Boomer!  I was born in 1947.  My parents were married in 1940, but because of World War II they waited until after the war (which ended in 1945) was over.  If you were born between 1946 and 1964, then you are officially a Baby Boomer.  So essentially, for me and those of you who were born in 1947, it is the period of time between when we were born and when we were in our Junior or Senior year of High School.  Being a Baby Boomer, we tended to think of ourselves as a special generation.  We were out to set the world on fire and bring big changes to the world, making it better, or so we thought.  Landon Y. Jones, an American editor and author, is credited with coining the term “baby boomer.”  Of course, growing up, we didn’t think about being Baby Boomers, we thought about getting through the school year, how we could get our parents to raise our allowances without us having to do more work for our money.  We thought about our friends and/or making friends, we thought about the opposite sex, and who we would like to dance with us at the next “Y” dance.  Basically, we thought about everything that people in every other generation has thought about or is thinking about.

In hind-sight, we should have been called “The Lucky Generation.”  With the exception of “The Korean War,” the “Cold War,” “The Cuban Missile Crisis,” and “Viet Nam,” we were lucky.  We were born after the big war (World War II).  About those, I have some recollection, but I have more vivid recollections about the aftermath of WW II.  I remember air raids and having to go out into the school halls in elementary school, sitting on the floor with our heads down waiting for the all-clear bell so we could go back to what we were doing in class (well, most of us waited for that…a few kids wanted to stay in the hall and not go back).  I remember when the air raid sirens would go off on the weekends and being at my paternal grandparents’ house, having to go into her cellar.  We had to access their cellar via a trap door in her kitchen, or we had to go outside and go in from the outside entrance.  I also remember it having a dirt floor.  I remember a young man named “Buzzy” having been in the Korean War. Now, I associate the Korean War with my husband.  I remember discussions about Fallout Shelters and singing anti-war songs at camp.  Those made a huge impression on me.  I still get tight inside whenever I sing or hear an anti-war song and I sing them loudly.  I remember Nikita Khrushchev, who was the prime minister of Russia during the period of time I was growing up. I even remember reading about Khrushchev’s visit to the newly opened Disney Land.  Disney World had not been built yet.  And yes, I remember the excitement of all of us when we learned about the opening of Disney World and how we yearned to go there.  To this day I have never been to Disney Land, but as an adult I visited Disney World before Epcot was built, but sadly we could only stay there a couple of hours.  I don’t remember the reason why we couldn’t stay longer.  I was living in Florida at that time and was about 25 years old, or a couple of years younger.  I’m having a Senior Moment here!  J

So why were we so lucky?  We were able to learn how to respect people.  We cared about people.  If the world was as crazy then as it is now (and I doubt that), we were sheltered from it.  We could safely walk the streets.  I remember walking all the way from my house to my paternal grandmother’s house with no problem.  She lived in what now would be considered “the inner city.”  My maternal grandparents lived upstairs of us.  Both grandmothers spoiled us!

We were lucky that we were governed by Harry S. Truman..  Truthfully, the only thing I remember about his term of office (besides what I learned in the history books when I got to high school), was his daughter, Margaret, playing the piano.  I don’t know why that is so embedded in my memory, but it is.  I always thought she was so beautiful and graceful.

And we were lucky to have had “Ike” (Dwight D. Eisenhower) as the next president that I recall.  I loved Ike!  He had a great smile and I always felt he was like a grandfather.  The thing I remember best about Ike is that he was always out on the golf course.  I really thought that golfing was a requirement of being President because of that.  I also felt safe with Ike because he had helped win World War II.  And Mamie, his wife, was a real class act, or at least appeared to be by me.

I remember in elementary school how we would hold mock elections and I remember being a staunch (if a kid of that age could ever be staunch about anything J) Adlai Stevenson supporter.  I just don’t

remember why! J Probably because he was a Democrat.

Why would I vote against Eisenhower when I liked him so much?  Got me!  I can’t quite recall all that far back! J

And we were lucky to have John Fitzgerald Kennedy as President.  I think he should be given a crown as I pictured him and Jackie Kennedy as King Arthur and Queen Guinevere. They were the epitome of America.  Young, beautiful, hopeful, and believed in all we believed in.  It was a tragedy that Jack and his brother Bobbie were both assassinated so soon after they were elected (in Jack’s case)/appointed (in Bobby’s case) to office.  I really think that history would show they were the crème d’ la crème of our


Leaders.  They brought youth, glamour, energy and life to the White House.  They were what many of us Baby Boomers wanted to be like.  Most importantly they brought hope of being able to get elected President of the United States no matter what your age (as long as you are 35+, according to our laws) and no matter what your religion is.  That in itself is quite a legacy!

I remember when I was in elementary school, making care boxes up for children who were less fortunate than I.  They were tiny boxes and we brought supplies like a box of 8 crayons (if memory serves me correctly, that was the only size available at the time), or a box of Band-Aids.  In those days Band-Aids came in tins. I remember getting “Weekly Readers.”  Now my youngest Grandson (age 10) gets them.  I’m glad that hasn’t changed!

I remember saying the Pledge of Allegiance every morning that we had school and saying a prayer that to me seemed non-denominational.  I don’t think that I really thought that people were of different religions except when it came to Christmas and Easter. Kids were kids period.  I was lucky enough to have parents who believed that you respect other people’s religions and races. I remember being able to have holiday parties.  It didn’t matter to me that those parties often celebrated holidays that my religion didn’t celebrate.  Where is the harm in having Valentine parties and exchanging Valentines, hoping that the boy/girl you had a crush on would give you a special one!  And I remember walking home for lunch.  Having a working Mother meant we would walk home to a lunch with my maternal Grandmother, or my Aunt who lived across the street from us.  Once in a while we would have lunch with a neighbor’s kids or go to the deli that was situated between home and school.  That was a real treat, to go to Bardy’s!  I remember going to Sanzel’s Drug Store with my Grandfather for ice cream.  I wish that Sanzel’s was still in business and still had their wonderful soda fountain.  I think I had a crush on every soda jerk that ever worked there!  J  It always amazed me that Harry Sanzel, the owner of Sanzel’s had two kids (who weren’t kids when I was growing up) that were both pharmacists and worked with him, especially since one was a female.  I didn’t know of any other female pharmacists at that time.  I wish I had a picture of Sanzel’s Drug Store.  If any of you readers have one, I’d love a copy!!!

I remember being able to cut through the woods, that was “attached” to our backyard, to Cobbs Hill which is my very favorite park, even to this day.  Cobbs Hill holds many memories for me…mostly from my teen years.  I remember going there on a nice Spring day (those were the days when we still had four seasons!) with my best friend, Estelle.  We would take our homework with us, sit under a special tree and do our homework, smoke and talk about boys or other important teenage topics.  Did we talk about life?  Not as such.  We talked about school.  We talked about friends.  We talked about what we were going to do on the weekend.  We talked about parties that were coming up and we’d talk about plans for the summer.  I was too old to go to camp by that time, so mostly I stayed around the house and my family would go on a week’s vacation.  Estelle just stayed around her house, which was no joy, unfortunately.  Cobbs Hill is where my high school sorority, Sigma Kappa Delta, held our initiation trials.  Thankfully they were not at all like the ones you read about today.  Our initiations consisted of walking a back trail up to the Cobbs Hill Reservoir or meeting our “big sisters” to bring them goody bags.  Sometimes it was to go up to someone not involved in the sorority and ask them something silly like, “Call me a cab.”  Was there underage excessive drinking, no.  Did some of us want to experiment with alcohol?  Maybe some of the guys did, but not the female friends.  We were content with drinking our Cokes and smoking.  Smoking was a cool thing to do in those days…if we only knew then what we know now!

I remember being at Cobbs Hill in the summer of 1964, reading The Profit, sitting under our favorite tree with Estelle, when all of a sudden we saw tanks driving down Monroe Avenue, turning onto Culver Road.  Estelle and I looked at one another and spoke with shock, wondering what the hell was going on.  We’d never seen anything like it!  The Armory was on Culver Road, directly across the street from Cobbs Hill and still was until recently when the government sold it.  We didn’t have a radio with us, so I suggested that we go to my house and tell my parents about it.  They hadn’t heard anything.  And we all sat on our porch steps wondering what was happening.  Shortly we learned that there was rioting downtown.  The “riot” was precipitated by the arrest of an allegedly drunk and disorderly African- American man at a Joseph Avenue street dance. A curfew was immediately put on us by the City, something I had never heard of before, but I was frightened enough by the tanks not to complain.  I remember how my friends and I baked cookies to take to the soldiers who were posted to Cobbs Hill (or maybe they were just on breaks).  We wanted them to know how much we appreciated their being there.  Funny, in retrospect, as just about two-three years later I would be joining a Peace March there.  Ironic!

But we were the lucky generation!  I wonder if there should be an adjective before the word “lucky,” and whether that adjective should be the word “bad.”  But we look back and remember that time as “the good old days.”

To remember those days, I’ll leave you with this recipe:

Mamie Eisenhower’s Chocolate Fudge Recipe

=======================================

Ingredients:

4-1/2 cups granulated sugar

2 tablespoons butter

1 can evaporated milk

Pinch of salt

12 ounces semi-sweet chocolate or chocolate bits

12 ounces German sweet chocolate

1 pint marshmallow cream

2 cups chopped nutmeats

Directions:

1. Heat the sugar, butter, salt and evaporated milk over low heat,

stirring until the chocolate dissolves.

2. Bring to a boil, and boil for six minutes.

3. Put the chocolate bits, German chocolate, marshmallow cream and

nutmeats into a heat resistant bowl.

4. Pour the mixture you’ve been boiling over the ingredients you’ve

just placed in the bowl.

5. Beat until the chocolate has melted, and then pour it all into a

pan. Let it stand for a few hours before cutting it into fudge sized

pieces.

This is truly a great fudge recipe!!!  It’s easy to make and it came out perfect!  I loved the fudge!  ~Softa123

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