COOKIES, COOKIES, COOKIES – CUT-OUTS

Posted on November 24, 2011. Filed under: Amish, Chanukah, Chanukah Cookies, Chocolate, Christmas, Christmas Cookies, Comfort Foods, Cookies, Cut-Out Cookies, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, German, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Oranges, Paerve, Parve, Rainy Day Foods, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Good morning…well it’s 4:49 AM EST as I begin this post.  I was going to do a 30 Day Cookie Countdown for Chanukah and Christmas, but with my upcoming surgery and going to my Mom’s for the 6 week recuperation period, I don’t know how often I will be able to post.  But, hopefully I’ll be back home faster than I anticipate and I’ll catch up with all of you.  If I can, I will do a Chanukah article and a Christmas article before things get crazier than they already are.  In light of the “no can do” countdown, I thought I would do a cookie category of the day, and since they take the longest to do, I thought I would begin with cut-out cookies, which are my favorite cookies during the holidays.  I tend not to make them any other time of the year; unless there is a special event like a shower or someone requests that I make them.  So let’s get baking!

My first offering is a Chanukah cut-out cookie from my dbase.  I must try to make these this year, if I am up to it.  If not, I may make it for Purim.  I love poppy seed cookies like this following recipe.  They remind me of my beloved maternal grandmother.

Chanukah Poppy Seed Cookies

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Ingredients

3 eggs

1 cup sugar

3/4 cup oil

Juice and rind of 1 orange

4 cups flour

1/4 cup poppy seeds

2 teaspoons baking powder

Salt

Directions:

Beat eggs.  Add sugar, oil, orange rind, and juice.  Stir in dry ingredients.

Roll out thin and cut into desired shapes.

Bake at 350 degrees. Check after 10 minutes. Remove when browned.

SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  Don’t frost these cookies.  They taste good plain!

The following recipe is for Chanukah chocolate star cookies.  I have never tasted a chocolate cut-out cookie, but what’s not to like?  It’s CHOCOLATE!

DISCLAIMER:   The above picture does not go along with the following recipe, but  looks to be similar.  ~SOFTA123

CHANUKAH CHOCOLATE STARS

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Yield: About 4 dozen

1/2 cup butter or margarine, softened

1 cup sugar

2 eggs

2 cups flour

1/2 cup cocoa

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

Powdered sugar, to decorate

Cream butter, sugar, and eggs until light and fluffy. In another bowl, stir together dry ingredients (except powdered sugar); beat into creamed mixture until well blended. Cover, and chill until firm enough to handle.

On lightly floured surface, roll dough to 1/8″ thick, cut with a Star of David-shaped cookie cutter.

Bake at 350°F, 5 to 7 minutes, or until no imprint remains when touched  ightly. Cool for 1 minute before removing from pan. When completely cooled, sprinkle with powdered  sugar.

Posted by Judith Sobel

I think that these Amish cut-out cookies must be devine!  I love cookies that are fragrantly laced with spices.  I would frost half of the batch with a thin confectioner’s sugar glaze (mix ¼ cup of confectioner’s sugar with a few drops of water, whisk or stir until smooth.  Keep adding water, a drop at a time and mixing till smooth until it is the consistency  you desire.  Don’t make it too thin, but if you find you have, then just add more confectioner’s sugar.  Brush the glaze onto the cookies using a pastry brush.

Amish Christmas Cookies

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1/2 cup butter

1 cup brown sugar

1 cup light molasses

1 egg, beaten

4 cups flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon ground clove

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease cookie sheets.

2. Cream butter and sugar. Blend in molasses and eggs.

3. Sift dry ingredients together and stir into molasses-egg mixture. Roll out dough on lightly floured board and cut into shapes with cookie utters.

4. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes.

The next recipe calls for Hartshorne and is a recipe my husband has asked me to make for years.  Maybe this will be his lucky year!  Start calling pharmacies to see who can get the Hartshorne for you!

Hartshorne German Christmas Cookies

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2 cups Sugar

1/2 teaspoon Salt

1-1/4 cups Shortening

2 Eggs

1 cup Milk

1 tablespoon Hartshorn ***

1/2 cup Boiling water

2 teaspoons Vanilla

Flour to stiffen

1 ounce Anise seeds

*** Hartshorne can be obtained at your pharmacy. It is ammonium crystals

1. Mix sugar, salt, shortening, eggs, and milk.

2. In a separate bowl, dissolve the Hartshorne in the boiling water. Make sure it is completely dissolved.

3. Add vanilla and anise seeds to the sugar mixture. 4. Add Hartshorne

mixture to sugar mixture.

5. Add enough flour to the sugar mixture to stiffen and not to be sticky. It may require 4-5 pounds! 6. Roll out dough on floured surface, and cut with cookie cutters.

7. Bake immediately after mixing in a moderate oven (325-350F) for 10-15 minutes.

“This entire recipe will make between 180-220 cookies. One half the recipe is suggested (up to 100 cookies). But, they are great!”

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THANKSGIVING – #4

Posted on November 16, 2011. Filed under: Breads - Yeast, Cherries, Coconut, Comfort Foods, Dairy, General Crafts, Holiday Songs, Hope, Kids, Oranges, Paerve, Party Ideas, Parve, Pears, Pineapple, Quick Breads, Recipes with Pumpkin, Scottish Recipes, Thanksgiving Recipes, Tried and True Recipe, Vegetables | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |


We Gather Together

Traditional Thanksgiving Song

We gather together to ask the Lord’s blessing;

He chastens and hastens His will to make known.

The wicked oppressing now cease from distressing.

Sing praises to His Name; He forgets not His own.

 

Beside us to guide us, our God with us joining,

Ordaining, maintaining His kingdom divine;

So from the beginning the fight we were winning;

Thou, Lord, were at our side, all glory be Thine!

 

We all do extol Thee, Thou Leader triumphant,

And pray that Thou still our Defender will be.

Let Thy congregation escape tribulation;

Thy Name be ever praised! O Lord, make us free!

I was not going to do a craft article today, but I ran across a project that is too cute and easy not to alert you to.  The project is a “Give Thanks” Fall Banner.  You can find it at a great craft site called “The Kurtz Corner,” and to get there just click on “Give Thanks.”  For today’s recipe theme I have chosen bread recipes.  Don’t forget you can make bread a week or two ahead of time and freeze it, then bake it fresh or if you already have baked it, just reheat it before serving.

When I think of bread, I think of a bread basket teaming with freshly baked bread, rolls, sweet rolls, muffins and quick breads just waiting to be topped with butter, margarine, jams, preserves and jellies of all kinds.  So, depending on my speed putting everything together, this may be part 1 of a 2 part series.  If it is, I will alert you to this fact at the bottom of the article.

My choice for the first recipe is a pumpkin challah.  Challah is egg bread that is eaten on Friday nights and Saturdays by Jewish people to celebrate the Sabbath.  It is also eaten on most holidays.  Flavored challahs such as this one is a very new innovation.  So far my favorite is chocolate chip!

Pumpkin Challah

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Yield: This recipe makes 2 smaller loaves.

“We like to eat one sliced and unadorned, and use the other loaf for French toast.”

Ingredients:

2-1/4 teaspoons (1 packet) yeast

2/3 cup warm water

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup pumpkin puree

1-1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom

4 cups flour, plus more for dusting and kneading

1 egg

Sesame or poppy seeds (optional)

Method:

In a large bowl, dissolve sugar and yeast in the warm water. Let sit 10 minutes until foamy.

Stir in pumpkin puree, salt, and spices. Add three cups of the flour and mix until well incorporated. Add remaining flour, a little at a time, until dough is only slightly sticky to the touch.

Dust counter or wooden board with flour and turn out dough. Knead, adding flour as needed, until you have a smooth, springy dough. Place  in a lightly greased bowl, cover, and let rise two hours, or until doubled in size.

Punch down dough and turn out onto flour-covered counter. Divide dough in half; set one half aside. For each half, divide into three approximately equal pieces. Form pieces into long snakelike strands, about 12 inches long. Braid together strands and tuck both ends under the loaf. Carefully place on a flour-dusted board, greased baking sheet, or in a greased loaf pan. Repeat for remaining dough.

Cover and let rise until doubled, about 40 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. If using a baking stone, start your preheat when you begin the second rise.

Beat egg and brush over the bread, and sprinkle on seeds, if using. Put loaves in oven and bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until tops are golden brown.

“In this version of challah, the pumpkin stands in for the eggs. Adding eggs will make for a richer dough, but of course remember that you’ll need to add flour to balance out the additional liquid.”

“Also, this pumpkin challah is only lightly spiced – I wanted to be able to have the bread fit as both breakfast and sliced alongside a savory dinner.”

Tips:

  • Use a kitchen scale to ensure equal division of dough. I’m just as bad at dividing sections for braiding bread as I am for braiding hair.
  • I add 3 cups of flour to start with and then add the rest slowly. Due to different moisture levels, varieties of flour, and measuring methods, it’s easier to start out with less flour and add what you need rather than adding all at once and finding your dough is too dry.
  • On the second rise I preheat the oven and set the dough nearby. My kitchen doesn’t maintain enough heat for bread to rise well on its own most days, so this helps tremendously.

SOFTA123’S NOTE:  I wish I knew who to credit the pumpkin challah recipe with, if anyone knows, please email me.  It’s such a well written recipe.  I also wonder how this would taste with a confectionery sugar glaze (a small amount of water mixed with a small amount of confectionery sugar for a not too thin consistency) put on it after it is thoroughly cooled.

 Figure 1 Photo by Wally G.

Favorite Sally Lunn Bread For Bread Machine

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Posted by Pink01

INGREDIENTS

For a 1 1/2 lb loaf bread:

 

1/4 cup heavy cream

1/4 to 3/8 cup water

3 large eggs

1-1/2 teaspoons salt

1/3 cup butter or margarine (cut up in pieces)

1/4 cup sugar

3 cups all purpose flour (or bread flour)

1-1/2 to 2 tsp yeast

DIRECTIONS

Place all ingredients in bread pan in order listed. Select “Basic/White Bread Cycle” and “Light Crust“. Press “Start. After the baking cycle ends, remove bread from pan, place on a wire rack and allow to cool 1 hour before slicing. Enjoy!

“I got this recipe from a Bread Machine cookbook but I can’t remember the name. This bread is awesome. It almost tastes like a pound cake!! Really delicious. It has a buttery taste. Can be sliced/toasted for sandwiches. My family looooves it!!” ~Pink01

SOFTA123’S NOTE:  I absolutely love Sally Lunn bread!  Try it, you might like it too!

Marilyn’s Garden Herb Bread

=================

1 pound Loaf:  (1 1/2 pound Loaf):

2 cups White Bread Flour, (3 cups)

1 tablespoon Dry Milk, (2 tablespoons)

1 tablespoon Sugar, (2 tablespoons)

1 teaspoon Salt, (1 1/2 teaspoons)

1 teaspoon Chives, (1/2 tablespoon)

1 teaspoon Marjoram, (1/2 tablespoon)

1 teaspoon Thyme, (1/2 tablespoon)

1/2 teaspoon Basil, (1 tablespoon)

1 tablespoon Butter, (2 tablespoons)

3/4 cup Water, (1 1/4 cups)

1 tablespoon Fast Rise Yeast -Or-, (2 teaspoons Fast Rise) Or

2 teaspoons Active Dry Yeast, (3 teaspoons Active Dry)

SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE: I rewrote the recipe to follow order of my machine. It works wonderfully in my Panasonic.

This bread tastes like stuffing! It is WONDERFUL!!!! Paul and I especially like it to make turkey sandwiches the day after Thanksgiving! ~SOFTA123

Here are some hints from the book I found the recipe in:

1. Use dried herbs that are flaked and not ground.  If using ground, reduce the amt. by half. If using fresh herbs, double the recipe.

2. This recipe can be made with the regular, rapid, or delayed time bake cycles.

This recipes comes from “Bread Electric” from the Innovative Cooking Enterprises. I make the regular size loaf in my machine.

Servings: 8 slices for the small loaf

Now let’s make some delicious dinner rolls.  This is my preference for the bread coarse at Thanksgiving.  I have to admit it, I cheat.  I buy the heat and serve rolls!  But maybe this year will be different.  Anyhow here are recipes for dinner rolls.

Pioneer Woman’s No Knead Dinner Rolls

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Added by Ree on June 26, 2009

Prep Time 4 Hours

Cook Time 20 Minutes

Servings 24

Difficulty Easy

Ingredients

4 cups Milk

1 cup Sugar

1 cup Vegetable Oil

9 cups Flour

2 packages (4 1/2 Tsp.) Active Dry Yeast

1 teaspoon (heaping) Baking Powder

1 teaspoon (scant) Baking Soda

2 tablespoons Salt

Preparation Instructions

Pour 4 cups of milk into a stock pot or Dutch oven. Add one cup of sugar and 1 cup of vegetable oil. Stir to combine. Now, turn the burner on medium to medium-low and “scald” the mixture/lukewarm (between 90 and 110 degrees). Before the mixture boils, turn off the heat. NOW.

Very important stuff here: walk away. Walk away and allow this mixture to cool to warm/lukewarm. The mixture will need to be warm enough to be a hospitable environment for the yeast, but not so hot that it kills the yeast and makes it inactive. I don’t usually use a thermometer, but if you’d like to, a good temperature is between 90 and 110 degrees. I usually feel the side of the pan with the palm of my hand. If it’s hot at all, I wait another 20 minutes or so. The pan should feel comfortably warm. When the mixture is the right temperature add in 4 cups of flour and 2 packages of (4-1/2 teaspoons) of active dry yeast.

After the yeast and flour are nicely incorporated, add another 4 cups of flour. Stir together and allow to sit, covered with a tea towel or lid, for an hour.

After about an hour it should have almost doubled in size. If it hasn’t changed much, put it in a warm (but turned off ) oven for 45 minutes or so. When it has risen sufficiently add 1 more cup of flour, 1 heaping teaspoon of baking powder, 1 scant teaspoon of baking soda and about 2 tablespoons of salt. Stir (or knead just a bit) until combined.

Butter 1 or 2 muffin pans.

Form the rolls by pinching off a walnut sized piece of dough and rolling it into a little ball. Repeat and tuck three balls of dough into each buttered muffin cup. Continue until pan is full. Cover and allow to rise for about 1 to 2 hours.

Bake in a 400-degree oven until golden brown, about 17 to 20 minutes.

SOFTA123’S NOTE:  For step-by-step instructions go to The Pioneer Woman’s

website located at:

http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2007/11/pw_dinner_rolls_-_no_kneading_required/

Whole Wheat Challah Rolls – Pareve

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Posted by : Karen Selwyn

“Flecks of grated carrot add color and flavor to these whole-wheat dinner rolls from cookbook author and food writer Judy Zeidler. The dough is remarkably easy to mix, knead and shape.” Judith Evans

2 cups whole-wheat flour

2 cups unbleached flour

1 package active dry yeast

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup warm water (110 to 115 degrees)

1/4 cup vegetable oil, plus more to coat bowl and top of dough

2 tablespoons honey

2 eggs, divided

1 cup peeled, grated carrots

Poppy seeds or sesame seeds

Combine whole-wheat and unbleached flours. Place 2 cups flour mixture, yeast and salt in a large mixing bowl.

Heat warm water, oil and honey in a saucepan or microwave oven until very warm, about 115 to 120 degrees. Add water mixture to flour-yeast mixture, beating until well blended. Add 1 egg, carrots and enough reserved flour to make a soft dough.

Turn dough onto a floured board. Knead 5 to 10 minutes, adding additional reserved flour as needed to make a smooth and elastic dough.  Place dough in an oiled bowl. Oil the top of dough. Cover with a towel; let rise in a warm place until double in size, about 1 1/2 hours.

Divide dough into about 30 small pieces. Form into long ropes, twist into knots and place on a greased baking sheet. Cover with a towel. Let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.

Beat remaining egg and use to brush tops of rolls. Sprinkle rolls with poppy seeds. Bake in a preheated 350-degree oven 20 to 30 minutes, or until golden brown.

Yield: About 30 rolls.

Source: “The 1994 Favorites” Judith Evans ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH (On-line edition), 1/2/95

Perfect Dinner Rolls

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“These rolls melt in your mouth. I loved them as a child, and I’m happy to make them for my kids because I know I am making for them the same wonderful memories my mom made for me!” —Gayleen Grote, Battle View, North Dakota

24 Servings

Prep: 30 min. + rising Bake: 15 min.

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon active dry yeast

2-1/4 cups warm water (110° to 115°)

1/3 cup sugar

1/3 cup shortening

1/4 cup powdered nondairy creamer

2-1/4 teaspoons salt

6 to 7 cups bread flour

Directions:

In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. Add the sugar, shortening, creamer, salt and 5 cups flour. Beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a soft dough (dough will be sticky).

Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes.

Place in a bowl coated with cooking spray, turning once to coat the top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.

Punch dough down. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; divide into 24 pieces. Shape each into a roll. Place 2 in. apart on baking sheets coated with cooking spray.

Cover and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes.

Bake at 350° for 12-15 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove from pans to wire racks.

Yield: 2 dozen.

Nutrition Facts: 1 roll equals 142 calories, 3 g fat (1 g saturated

fat), 0 cholesterol, 222 mg sodium, 25 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 4 g

protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1-1/2 starch, 1/2 fat.

Golden Sweet Cornbread

======================

Submitted By: bluegirl

Photo By: larkspur

Prep Time: 10 Minutes

Cook Time: 25 Minutes

Ready In: 35 Minutes

Servings: 12

“If you like sweet cornbread, this is the recipe for you! My mom made this for me as a child, and now it’s my family’s favorite.”

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup yellow cornmeal

2/3 cup white sugar

1 teaspoon salt

3-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1 egg

1 cup milk

1/3 cup vegetable oil

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Spray or lightly grease a 9 inch round cake pan.

In a large bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt and baking powder. Stir in egg, milk and vegetable oil until well combined. Pour batter into prepared pan.

Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 12 Calories: 188 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 7.4g Cholesterol: 19mg Sodium: 354mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 28.2g Dietary Fiber: 1g Protein: 3.1g

White Chocolate Cranberry Quick Bread

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2-1/4 cups All-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon Salt

1/4 teaspoon Baking soda

5 ounces White chocolate; coarsely chopped

8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter; softened

1 cup Granulated sugar

3 large Eggs; at room temperature

1/2 cup Buttermilk

3 tablespoons Orange juice

1 teaspoon Grated orange zest

1 teaspoon Vanilla extract

3/4 cup Dried cranberries; chopped

YIELD: 1 loaf

PREPARATION:

45 minutes plus baking and cooling times.

1. Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees F. Lightly butter a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan. Dust the pan with flour and tap out the excess.

2. In a medium bowl, using a wire whisk, stir together the flour, salt, and baking soda. Set aside.

3. Melt the white chocolate according to the directions in the chocolate Melting Tips. Set aside to cool.

4. In a 4 1/2-quart bowl of a heavy-duty electric mixer using the paddle attachment, beat the butter at medium speed for 2 minutes until creamy.  While continuing to beat the butter, gradually add the sugar 1 teaspoon at a time until completely incorporated into the butter. Beat in the eggs, one at a time. Using a rubber spatula, scrape down the side of the bowl and beat the mixture for 1 minute more. At low speed, beat the buttermilk into the batter. At this point the batter will look curdled.

Add the melted white chocolate, orange juice, zest, and vanilla to the batter and mix just until blended.

5. At low speed, add the dry ingredients to the batter one-third at a time and mix until blended. Stir in the chopped dried cranberries.

6. Scrape the batter into the prepared loaf pan and bake for 70 to 75 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean. Cool the bread in the pan set on a wire rack for 15 minutes.

Remove the bread from the pan and cool it completely on a wire rack.

Thanksgiving Bread Recipe

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Thanksgiving Bread ingredients list:

4 medium eggs

4 cups of all purpose flour

3 cups of sugar

2 cups of cranberries (fresh or frozen)

2 cups of pumpkin (cooked or canned)

1 cup of vegetable oil

2 tablespoons of pumpkin pie spice

2 teaspoons of baking soda

1 teaspoon of salt

 

Instructions for Thanksgiving Bread:

In a suitably sized mixing bowl, beat the eggs and sugar. Add the pumpkin and vegetable oil and mix thoroughly.

Add all of the dry ingredients and stir until just moistened.  Fold in the fresh or frozen cranberries.

Spoon into suitably sized loaf pans.

Bake at 350°F (175°C) for 60 minutes.

Allow to cool for 10 minutes, then remove to wire racks.

Orange Praline Quick Bread

==========================

“A crusty brown sugar glaze adds just a touch of the South to these Orange-scented mini loaves.”

20 min. Prep time

60 min. Total time

32 servings (4 mini loaves)

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup sugar

1 cup LAND O LAKES® Sour Cream

1/2 cup LAND O LAKES® Butter, softened

2 eggs

1 tablespoon freshly grated orange peel

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup chopped pecans

Glaze

1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar

1/3 cup LAND O LAKES® Butter

1/4 cup finely chopped pecans

Heat oven to 350°F. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in small bowl. Set aside.

Combine all remaining bread ingredients except pecans in large bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until well mixed. Reduce speed to low. Beat, gradually adding flour mixture, just until moistened. Stir in 1 cup pecans.

Spoon batter evenly into 4 greased (5 1/2×3-inch) mini loaf pans. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans.

Meanwhile, combine brown sugar and 1/3 cup butter in 1-quart saucepan. Cook over medium heat until mixture comes to a boil (3 to 4 minutes).

Spoon glaze mixture over warm loaves. Immediately sprinkle with 1/4 cup pecans.

Substitute for Mini Loaf Pans:   1 greased (9×5-inch) loaf pan. Bake for 60 to 65 minutes.

Recipe Tip:

Serve bread with maple-flavored butter. Combine 1/3 cup softened butter, 1/4 cup orange marmalade and 1 tablespoon maple syrup in small bowl; mix well.

Calories: 160Fat: 10gCholesterol: 30mgSodium: 125mgCarbohydrates:

16gDietary Fiber: <1gProtein: 2g

This recipe was reprinted from landolakes.com.

http://www.landolakes.com/recipe/7 6

Pina Colada Quick Bread

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“Think pina colada, think summer time … but do you think bread? It sounds like the oddest of combinations, but there are lots of variations on recipes for pina colada quick bread (or coconut pineapple bread).”

Ingredients

4 eggs

1 & 1/4 cup oil

2 cups granulated sugar

1 teaspoon coconut extract

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon orange extract

1/4 cup pineapple juice

1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 (20 ounce) can crushed pineapple, drained

1/2 cup flaked coconut

1/2 cup chopped maraschino cherries

Instructions

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Grease and flour well two 7 x 4-inch loaf pans.

Beat eggs slightly. Stir in oil and sugar. Add extracts, pineapple juice and orange zest.

In a separate bowl, soft together flour, salt, baking soda and cinnamon. Add to egg mixture and miX just until ingredients are moistened.

Gently stir in crushed pineapple, coconut, maraschino cherries and nuts. Do not stir too much or bread will be heavy.

Pour into prepared loaf pans. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted comes out clean.

Let cool in pan for 10 minutes before removing.

CulinaryTradition: USA (Nouveau)

 

Sparkling Orange Scones

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“These buttery sugared scones are perfect for gift-giving or a warm breakfast tea.”

30 min. Prep time

1 :10 Total time

16 scones

Topping

 1/4 cup sugar

1-1/2 teaspoons freshly grated orange peel

Scones

 

2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup cold LAND O LAKES® Butter, cut into 8 pieces

1/2 cup sugar

3/4 cup sweetened dried cranberries or blueberries or finely chopped dried aprico s

3/4 cup LAND O LAKES™ Half & Half

1 egg

1 tablespoon freshly grated orange peel

Almond Butter

  

1/2 cup LAND O LAKES® Butter, softened

2 tablespoons powdered sugar

1/2 teaspoon almond extract

Heat oven to 375°F. Combine all topping ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Set aside.

Combine flour, baking powder and salt in large bowl; cut in butter with pastry blender or fork until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in 1/2 cup sugar and cranberries.

Stir together half & half, egg and 1 tablespoon orange peel in small bowl until smooth. Stir into flour mixture just until moistened. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; knead 8 to 10 times until smooth, adding small amount of flour, if necessary.

Divide dough in half. Pat each half into 7-inch circle. Place 2 inches apart onto large ungreased baking sheet. Sprinkle topping evenly over dough. Score each half into 8 wedges; do not separate. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until scones are lightly browned. Cool 15 to 20 minutes on baking sheet.

Meanwhile, combine all almond butter ingredients in small bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until well mixed.

To serve, separate scones while warm. Serve with almond butter. Store leftover scones in container with tight-fitting lid at room temperature. Store remaining almond butter covered in refrigerator.

TIP: One large or two medium oranges will yield what is needed for the grated orange peel.

TIP: A pastry blender is made of 5 or 6 parallel U-shaped steel wires attached at both ends to a handle. It cuts the butter into small pieces so the flour can coat the particles. Two knives may also be used.

Calories: 240Fat: 12gCholesterol: 45mgSodium: 190mgCarbohydrates:

30gDietary Fiber: 1gProtein: 3g Recipe #11682©2001Land O’Lakes, Inc.

This recipe was reprinted from landolakes.com.

Almond Muffins

==============

Almond Muffins ingredients list:

1 medium egg, beaten

2 cups of flour

3/4 cup of milk

1/2 cup of almonds, chopped

1/2 cup of sugar

1/2 cup of oil

1 tablespoons of baking powder

1/2 teaspoon of almond extract

1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon of nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon of salt

Instructions for Almond Muffins:

Mix together the egg, milk, oil and almond extract.

In another bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, nutmeg,

cinnamon, salt and chopped almonds.

Mix the two mixtures.

Bake at 390F for about 15 minutes.

Pear Upside-Down Muffins

========================

Recipe #386216

| 1 1/4 hours | 40 min prep |

By: daisygrl64

Aug 19, 2009

“These cakelike muffins with sticky tops turn out of the pan perfectly, if you Let them cool a little first. And Oh Boy….are these Fabulous!!” ~Daisygrl64

Yield: 12 muffins

Ingredients

 

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup brown sugar, packed

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup buttermilk

1/2 cup butter, melted

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

Topping

2 pears, peeled, cored and cut into 1/2inch slice

1/2 cup brown sugar, packed

1/4 cup raisins

1 teaspoon cinnamon

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Directions

1 grease nonstick muffin cups. line bottoms with parchment or waxed paper and set aside.

2 Topping:.

3 peel, core, and cut pears into 1/2 dice, place in a bowl. add sugar, raisins, and cinnamon, stir to mix.

4 in skillet melt butter over medium heat, cook pear mixture, stirring, until pears are tender, about 5 minutes. divide among muffin cups and set aside.

5 in bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. in separate bowl whisk buttermilk, butter, egg, and vanilla. add to dry ingredients and stir just until moistened. spoon over each muffin cup that has the pear mixture in.

6 bake in centre of 375*F oven until toothpick inserted in centre comes out clean, about 20 minutes.

7 let cool on rack for 10 minutes. invert onto baking sheet.

8 serve topping side up.

Carrot, Sunflower Seed And Raisin Bran Muffins

==============================================

CDKitchen http://www.cdkitchen.com

Serves/Makes: 12

Difficulty Level: 3

Ready In: 30-60 minutes

Ingredients:

2-1/2 cups Wheat Bran

1-1/2 cups Whole-Wheat Flour

2 teaspoons Baking Soda

2 teaspoons Baking Powder

1 teaspoon ground Cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground Ginger

1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt

1/4 teaspoon ground Nutmeg

1-1/2 cups Apple Juice

1/4 cup Blackstrap Molasses

2 tablespoons Sunflower Oil; plus additional for oiling pan

3/4 cup Carrots; shredded

1/2 cup Sunflower Seeds

1/2 cup Raisins

Directions:

PREHEAT oven to 350 degrees F.

Using a little sunflower oil, LIGHTLY OIL a muffin pan and set aside. In a large bowl, place the wheat bran, whole wheat flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger, salt, and nutmeg, and stir well to combine.

In a small bowl, place the apple juice, molasses, and sunflower oil, and whisk well to combine.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir well to combine. Add the remaining ingredients and gently fold them into the muffin batter.

Fill each of the prepared muffin cups 3/4 full with the batter. Bake at 350 degrees F. for 25 to 30 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

Remove the muffin tin from the oven and allow the muffins to cool for several minutes before removing them from the muffin tin. Store the completely cooled muffins in an airtight container.

Recipe Location:

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/503/Carrot-Sunflower-Seed-And-Rai1

26924.sht l

Recipe ID: 97797

Watch for tomorrow’s post (11/16/2011) for spreads to go with these breads!

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Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah

Posted on October 18, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Cheese, Cherries, Dairy, Desserts, Dinner/Supper, Ethnic Recipe, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Menu, My Ramblings, Oranges, Pineapple, Recipes, Scottish Recipes, Shimi Atzaret Recipes, Shmini Atzaret, Side Dish, Simchat Torah, Simchot Torah Recipes, Soup, Sour Cream | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |



Did you know that Simchat Torah is actually a ceremony during Shemini Atzeret?  I didn’t, or at least I didn’t remember it.  Most people I know simply refer to the upcoming holiday as Simchat Torah.  Shemini Atzeret is a two-day holiday, beginning on October 21, 2011 (don’t forget, Jewish holidays are not celebrated on the same date on the Gregorian calendar as other non-Jewish holidays do) and ending on October 23, 2011.  We celebrate Simchat Torah immediately following the end of Succot.  The word “simcha” means “joy, celebration, rejoicing” in English.  So, on Simchat Torah, we are rejoicing over the Torah (the Five Books of Moses).  This is because on Simchat Torah we complete our reading of the Torah and we begin it all over again.

Many things happen in our celebration of the Torah, we eat, and eat, and eat.  We say Yizkor, which I explained in my Yom Kippur article.  We add a blessing for rain.  This is the only time that we give a Torah  an  aiiyah  (aliyah has two meanings,  1) a high honor; 2) immigrating to Israel.  In this case it means “a high honor”).  This is the only time that we have three Torahs out during a Torah service.  And this is the only time when we take all the Torahs out and we dance with the Torahs and sing joyous songs.  The children get a Jewish Flag on a stick and an apple and they parade around waving their flags and holding their apples.  It is a great celebration and a lot of fun.

The traditional dish of Shemini Atzeret is stuffed cabbage.  Although Paul loves it, you won’t find this dish in my house!  I can’t stand the smell of the cabbage cooking, let alone eat it…yuk!  But this is a menu  that I can live with and yes, I’ll post a recipe for stuffed cabbage also.

Shemini Atzeret Menu  With A Scottish Bent To It

Wine for Kiddish (blessing)

Challah (not a round one) for Hamotzi

Carrot Soup With Honey And Ginger*

Paula’s Mozzarella and Tomato Salad*

Scottish Baked Brown Trout*

Peas

Dairy Noodle Kugel*

Caledonian Cream*

Iced Cherry Cake*

Carrot Soup With Honey And Ginger Recipe

========================================

This is a Scottish soup recipe.

Ingredients:

10 cups water

1-1/2 cups butter

3 medium onions, peeled and thinly sliced

2 tablespoons grated ginger root

12 turns of freshly ground pepper

1 tablespoons sea salt

3 pounds carrots, peeled and shredded

Juice of 1/3 small lemon

1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon quality honey

GARNISH:

1/2 cup heavy cream

1/4 cup chives

Directions:

Place a large Dutch oven on the stove with 10 cups of water. Bring water to a boil and keep it warm on the stove top.

In a separate stockpot, add butter and onions and cook over medium-high heat until the onions turn translucent. Add the ginger to the pot. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add the shredded carrots to the stock pot and mix well to combine the ingredients. Squeeze in the juice from the lemon and pour in the honey. Stir the mixture well to blend.

Pour in the 10 cups of hot water and cook the soup on a gentle, rolling boil for 45 minutes. When the soup is cooked and the carrots are tender, transfer the soup into a food processor in batches and puree until smooth. Dish the soup out into individual serving bowls and add a little cream to each bowl, running it through with a butter knife or spatula. Garnish with the chives.

Yield: 10 servings

Graphic Source:  Acclaim Clipart

Paula’s Mozzarella and Tomato Salad

Recipe courtesy Paula Lambert, The Cheese Lover’s Cookbook and Guide, Simon & Schuster, 2000

 

Total Time:  10 min

Prep:  10 min

Yield:  4 servings

Level:  Easy

 

Ingredients

 

2 large ripe tomatoes, peeled and sliced 1/4-inch thick

8 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced 1/4-inch thick

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

8 fresh basil leaves

 

 

 

Directions

Arrange the tomato and mozzarella slices on a platter or individual salad plates, overlapping the slices and fanning them out like a deck of cards.

Sprinkle with the salt and pepper.

Drizzle with the oil.

Garnish with the basil: Cut it into very thin slices or tear into bits and sprinkle on top or leave the leaves whole and tuck them here and there between the mozzarella and tomato slices. Serve immediately.

Scottish Baked Brown Trout

=================

“Trout, freshly caught from the river, is a dependable dish to have in Scottish restaurants, especially in the Highlands. In this recipe the fish cooks in its own juices, with baking foil keeping it moist. Quantities below are for four people.”

Ingredients:

Four half pound (250g) trout

4 tablespoons dry vermouth

2 tablespoons olive oil

Sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper

4 sprigs of fresh herbs (dill, fennel, chives or parsley)

1 lemon

Method:

Pre-heat oven at 450F (230C or Gas Mark 8).

Clean the trout if required, remove the scales and fins and wipe with kitchen paper. Season the inside of the trout with salt and pepper and insert the herbs.

Cut four pieces of kitchen foil into oval shapes which are long enough to take the fish plus an extra 3″ (7cm) foil. Brush the foil with olive oil and place each trout in the centre. Brush the outside of the fish with olive oil, season with salt and pepper and pour a tablespoon of vermouth over each fish.

Pull the foil up to make a boat shape for the fish and pleat over the top to totally enclose the fish, making sure it is pinched together. Place on a baking sheet and bake in a pre-heated oven at 450F (230C or Gas Mark 8) for 8 to 10 minutes. The time will vary, depending on how plump the fish are. Check by opening up foil and examining the flesh at the thickest part. There should be no opaqueness or pinkness. The fish can be served in the foil with fresh vegetables.

SOFTA’S DISCLAIMER:  This photo is not a photo of this recipe.  It is a Photo I found on the internet that looks similar.

 

  

Dairy Noodle Kugel

==================

Ingredients:

8 ounces fine egg noodles

1/4 pound butter, melted

4 eggs, beaten

2 teaspoons vanilla

3/4 cup sugar

16 ounces cottage cheese

16 ounces sour cream

1 can crushed pineapple

Topping

1 sleeve graham crackers, crushed

Cinnamon and sugar to taste

Directions:

Preheat oven to 330 degrees F.

Cook noodles and drain.

Beat eggs and sugar until light. Add melted butter and vanilla. Add cottage cheese and sour cream. Add noodles and mix well.

Put in greased 9×13 pan. Mix crushed graham crackers with sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle over top.

Bake at 300 degrees for 1 hour.

Photo Source:  All-Free Download.com

Caledonian Cream

================

Here is a refreshing dessert which uses marmalade which is a popular ingredient in Scottish cooking since its invention in Dundee in 1797.

Ingredients for the cream:

4 ounces cream cheese (about half a cup)

4 fluid ounces double cream (about half a cup)

1 tablespoon marmalade (thick, bitter marmalade is

suggested but use what you have on hand)

2 tablespoons brandy or rum

2 teaspoons lemon juice

Sugar to taste

Ingredients for base:

4 oranges, segmented and the pith removed

Method:

Blend all the ingredients for the cream in a liquidizer  till smooth.  (SOFTA123’S NOTE:  what the Scottish people call a liquidizer is what we Americans call a blender.)

Place the oranges in four long-stemmed glasses and, if you want, add a teaspoon of brandy (or rum) to these. Add the cream on top.

Garnish with some orange zest (boil for a few minutes in water to  reduce the bitterness).

Serve chilled.

Servings: 4

Iced Cherry Cake

==================

Cherry cake, with icing on top, is one of the mainstays of Scottish home baking  tearooms.

Ingredients:

8 ounces (250g/One and a quarter cups in North America) self-raising flour

(all-purpose flour with baking powder)

8 ounces (250g/one cup) margarine

8 ounces (250g/one and a quarter cups) caster sugar (fine granulated sugar)

4 eggs (medium)

8 ounces (250g/one cup) glacé cherries

8 ounces (250g/one and a quarter cups) icing sugar (frosting)

Method:

Preheat the oven to 160C/325F/Gas Mark 3 (or slightly higher if not an electric fan assisted oven) and line a baking tray (8″ x 12″ x 1½” or 20cm x 30cm x 5cm) with parchment paper.

Wash, dry and chop up the cherries to remove the glacé coating (but retaining some as quarter  cherries to decorate the top later).  If you coat them in some flour it will stop them sinking to the bottom of the cake.

Cream the margarine and sugar together thoroughly until light and fluffy (to help the cake rise with the trapped air). Beat in the eggs, one at a time, until smooth.

Stir in the flour and then add the cherries. Spread evenly into the tin and bake in the middle of the oven for about 40 minutes. Allow to cool in the tin.

Add a little water at a time to the icing sugar (frosting) until it has a consistency which coats the back of a metal spoon without running off.

Remove the cake from the tin and spread the icing sugar evenly on top.

Decorate with quartered cherries.

SOFTA123’S NOTE:  The next recipe, the recipe for stuffed cabbage, does not go along with the above menu as the stuffed cabbage recipe is for a meat meal and the menu is for a dairy meal.

Holishkes (Stuffed Cabbage)

===========================

By Sharon Lebewohl and Rena Bulkin

The Second Avenue Deli Cookbook

The Second Avenue Deli

Recipe Reviews (43)

User rating 88 % would make it again

Main ingredients: Cabbage, Vegetable, Citrus, Onion, Egg, Rice, Garlic, Tomato

Cuisine – Jewish

Dietary considerations – Kosher

Yield: Makes 7 pieces

Ingredients:

Stuffing:

1-1/2 pounds chopmeat (SOFTA123’S NOTE: ground beef, ground veal or ground turkey is fine to use in this recipe.)

3/4 cup uncooked white rice

1 cup finely chopped onion

2 eggs, beaten

1/2 cup water

1 tablespoon finely chopped or crushed fresh garlic

2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

Sauce:

2 cups plain tomato sauce

1-1/2 cups finely chopped onion

1/2 orange, chopped with peel into 1/2-inch pieces; remove pits

2/3 lemon, chopped with peel into 1/2-inch pieces; remove pits

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1 cup white sugar

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/2 cup white vinegar

2 cups water

1-1/2 teaspoons salt

1 large lightweight young green cabbage

1 medium green cabbage. You’ll need 4 cups (if you don’t have enough, supplement with leftovers from the large cabbage).

Preparation:

In a large bowl, combine all the stuffing ingredients. Stir them with a fork, then mix thoroughly with your hands. Cover and refrigerate.

In another bowl, thoroughly mix all sauce ingredients. Cover and refrigerate.

Fill a very large stockpot three-quarters full with water and bring to a rapid boil. While bringing the water to a boil, use a thin, sharp knife to make deep cuts around the core of the large cabbage (cut into the cabbage in a circle about 1/4 inch out from the core). Lift out the core, making a hole about 2 inches wide and 2 1/2 inches deep. This is a bit difficult — persevere.

Set out a baking tray neat the stove. Stick a long cooking fork into the core hole of the large cabbage, and plunge it (carefully, so you don’t splash yourself) into the pot of rapidly boiling water. The outer leaves will begin to fall off. Leave them in the boiling water for a few minutes until they’re limp and flexible enough for stuffing; then take them out one at a time, and place them on the baking tray. Try not to tear the leaves. When all the leaves are on the tray, transfer it into the sink and pour the boiling water from the pot over them. Wash the leaves carefully in cold water. With a small, sharp knife, trim off the tough outer spines and discard them.

Find your largest leaves, and set them out on a plate. Set out all other leaves on another plate. One at a time, line each large leaf with another large leaf or two smaller leaves. (The idea is to strengthen your cabbage wrapping so that the stuffing stays securely inside during cooking. Be sure to align the spines of inner and outer leaves.) Stuff with 3/4 cup of the meat-rice mixture, roll very tightly along the spine, and close both sides by tucking them in with your fingers. The spine should be vertical in the center of tour roll.

Stir the 4 cups of chopped cabbage into the sauce. Pour 3/4 inch of the sauce into a large, wide-bottomed stockpot. Arrange the cabbage rolls carefully on top of the sauce, and pour the remainder of the sauce over them to cover. Cover pot and simmer for 1 hour and 45 minutes. Serve with boiled potatoes and a vegetable.

Paul and I wish everyone at Gut Yom Tov!


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SUKKOT

Posted on October 13, 2011. Filed under: Brownies, Cheese, Cherries, Chocolate, Cookies, Cupcakes, Dairy, Desserts, Dinner/Supper, Ethnic Recipe, Family, Fish, Honey, Jello, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Lemons, Menu, My Ramblings, Pears, Pineapple, Recipes, Sukkot, Sukkot Recipes, Traditions, Tried and True Recipe, Vegetables, Vegetarian | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


The holiday of Sukkot begins on the 15th day of the month of Tishrei. Known in rabbinic literature as Ha-Chag–“the holiday”–the themes of Sukkot are clearly of high importance in Jewish theology.  Sadly, many Jews, including myself, really don’t celebrate it.  Perhaps we have a festive meal and perhaps we are lucky enough to be invited to eat dinner in a sukkah (open air booth) built by a friend or family member.  Or perhaps our synagogue has a communal meal to celebrate that we can take part in.  In part it is the fault of our school system here in the U.S.  In part it is the fault of today’s world.  And in part, it is the fault of our parents and/or of us.  We have to take so much time off for Rosh  Hashanah and Yom Kippur that we tell ourselves (and it is probably not far from the truth) that we will be fired if we take too much time off from our jobs, even if it is for religious reasons.  At one time employers may have been more sympathetic to our needs, but not any longer.  Our children are allowed to miss only so many days a year and here in the North that means we have to plan missed snow days.  Don’t forget that kids get sick, especially during the winter, as we adults also do.  Doctor appointments, dental appointments, “tummy ache” days, they all add up.  So how can we allow our children to take time off?  Even if we did insist they take the time off, how are they ever going to catch back up with the other kids, let alone bypass them in the race for college scholarships, let alone college admittance?  So our observance of Sukkot, the most beautiful of our holidays, and one of the most important of our holidays takes a back burner to the secular world and our secular lives.  I am glad to say that more and more people that I know do take the time to build their own personal sukkahs and take the time to celebrate.  Last year Paul and I were invited to our Cousin Susan’s sukkah along with many other people.  Susan is the hostess with the moistest and her sukkah and sukkah party were no exception.  This year we have been invited to our good friends’ The Sterns, sukkah for an intimate family dinner.  We are hoping that the weather will be with us so we can at least do the ceremonial part of the meal in the sukkah, if not have our entire meal out there beneath the stars.  I know in Kingston, my step-son-in-law and grandson are helping to build their synagogue’s sukkah and will be celebrating there with the temple family.  My mom will be going to my Aunt’s house or my cousin’s house.

The symbolism of the sukkah is a strong reminder of the dwellings of the biblical Israelites as they wandered in the desert for 40 years after the exodus from Egypt. In this manner, these temporary dwellings return us to a different time in our development and remind us of our journey to nationhood.  That answers the question “is Judaism” a nation?  Yes, in part it is.

Another symbolic definition of the sukkah is that it binds us to G-d as we recall our dependence on him for our daily needs and we celebrate all that he does for us.  We are commanded to be joyous during the whole holiday period (7 days) of Sukkot. We are told that it is a worse sin to be sad during this period than to have a sip of water on Yom Kippur.  I had no idea until I started writing this article of just how important Sukkot is in Judaism.

People take great pride in decorating their sukkah, but it is always decorated with fruits and greenery to remind us that Sukkot is a harvest holiday.  I went rummaging through the Net to find some pictures of the coolest sukkahs.  Here are some I think gives you an idea of the different types of sukkahs you can find.

This is a very basic sukkah.  I found it at the Mont Clair Jewish Organization’s website.

This picture is of a pre-fab sukkah that you can purchase.  I found this picture at Tzvee’s Talmudic Blog.

This is a great example of a sukkah decorated with fruits and greens.  Click on the photo to go to HWPS Organization’s website.

This is my favorite.  I love that it is decorated with colorful paper chains like the ones I made as a child in addition to the fruit and grains.  I was very impressed with the article on Sukkot that this photo was a part of.  Click on to the website after you finish reading my article.  This sukkah, I think is in Israel.  The website is called “Israelity.com.”

“There is also a commandment in the Torah for each person to take the fruit of a “goodly tree,” later interpreted as a fruit called an etrog (citron). Along with this fruit, one must collect certain tree branches and rejoice before God. We therefore take a palm branch and connect to it myrtle twigs and willow branches. There are beautiful narratives in rabbinic literature that discuss the symbolic images of the etrog and lulav (as the combination of the palm, myrtle, and willow is collectively known). They include parallels to the Jewish matriarchs and patriarchs as well as to the body and soul of each individual Jew.”[1]

There are other themes but my typing time is running out and I do want to share a Succot Menu and recipes with you.  For more information, click on the footnote and read the article where I found most of my information.  This menu is for a buffet meal.  The recipes are included for menu items that have an asterisk at the end of the name of the item.

DISCLAIMER:  The only photos that look like the recipes they go with are the Mandel Bread and the Russian Tea Cookies and the mini cupcakes.  Where I could, for the graphics, I attached links to them.

Just click on the picture.

SUCCOT MENU

Raisin Challah for the Blessing

Wine for the Blessing

Tossed Salad with Pomegranate Seeds

Smoked White Fish Salad purchased from a Kosher Deli or a grocery store that carries it

Egg Salad OR Deviled Eggs

Crackers

Aunt Hushie’s Salmon Balls served with Rice*

Roasted Vegetable Lasagna*

Luchshen Kugel*

Molded Fruit Salad*

Al Fuchsman’s Mandel Bread (cookies)*

Chewy Brownies*

Russian Tea Cookies*

Mini Pumpkin Spice Cupcakes with Cinnamon Chip Icing*

Coffee, Tea, Fruit Punch or Soft Drinks, Water

Aunt Hushie’s Salmon Balls

==========================

1 pound Salmon plus liquid

1 small Onion; grated

1 small Carrot; grated

2 Eggs; beaten

1/2 cup Matzah Meal OR Corn Flake Crumbs

Salt

Pepper

Dash of Nutmeg

MUSHROOM SAUCE:

1 Onion; diced and browned

1/2 cup diced, cooked Carrots & liquid

1 small can Mushrooms & Liquid

1/8 teaspoon Ginger

1/8 teaspoon Nutmeg

Salt

Pepper

3/4 cup Ketchup

3/4 cup Water

Mix salmon & liquid, small onion, small carrot, 2 eggs, matzah meal, salt, pepper and dash of nutmeg together and allow to set for 10 mins.

With WET hands, form into small balls (golf size balls), roll in crumbs and fry quickly.  Drain on paper towels.

SAUCE:

Mix together all sauce ingredients. Pour sauce into GREASED baking pan.  Place patties on sauce and heat in 350 degree oven UNCOVERED for 20-30 mins.

This is a wonderful recipe for brunches and luncheons. We have made many times and always get raves.  This was first made for us by my Aunt Hushie and it was Helen Schiller’s recipe (a friend of my Aunt’s) from my older edition of Rochester Hadassah Cookbook.  Please note that Aunt Hushie taught me to make this recipe in the large disposable aluminum 9×13-inch pans.  If you place the patties by the markings on the side of the pan, it works perfectly.  Also note that whenever my Aunt or I have made this recipe, we usually triple it.  I’ve made it for showers and other special occasions, so I think it is perfect for a dairy meal for Sukkot. ~Marilyn aka Softa123

 

 

 

Fruit Noodle Kugel          

===================

1 (16 ounce) package broad egg noodles

3/4 cup sugar

2 eggs, slightly beaten

1/2-1 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 pound butter

2 grated Winesap apples

2 grated pears

1/2 cup orange juice

1/2-1 c. white raisins

Cook noodles in boiling salted water 25-30 minutes. Strain and rinse with cold water. Add butter to noodles and mix until melted. Add sugar,eggs, cinnamon, fruits, juices and raisins. Mix gently. Pour intogreased 9 x 13 x 2 inch Pyrex dish. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 1/2 to 2hours, depending upon crustiness desired. Serve warm or cold.

Softa123’s aka Marilyn’s Note:  I have not tried this recipe yet, but I think it sounds perfect for Sukkot as it features pears in addition to the normal apples and raisins.  Also, what is nice about this recipe is that it is parve, so it can be eaten with either a dairy or a meat meal.

 

 

 

 

Roasted Vegetable Lasagna

=========================

By: preciousmom

PRECIOUS MOM’S NOTE:  “My first try with a vegetarian lasagna.”

Prep Time: 50 Min

Cook Time: 45 Min

Ready In: 1 Hr 35 Min

Servings: 9

Ingredients

1 pound eggplant, sliced into 1/4 inch rounds

1/2 pound medium fresh mushrooms cut into 1/4 inch slices

3 small zucchini, cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch slices

1 onion, chopped

3 tablespoons olive oil

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

1 (15 ounce) container reduced-fat ricotta cheese

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

2 eggs, beaten

1 (26 ounce) jar meatless spaghetti sauce

1 can of Italian diced tomatoes

12 no-boil lasagna noodles

2 cups shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese

3 tablespoons minced fresh basil

Directions

Line two 15-in. x 10-in. x 1-in. baking pans with foil.  Place all vegetables (except onions) in a zip lock back with the oil, salt and pepper. Shake the bag to make sure everything is coated and let sit for 5 minutes.

Place eggplant and mushrooms on a pan. Place the zucchini on the second pan. Bake, uncovered, at 400 degrees F for 15 minutes. Turn vegetables over. Bake 15 minutes longer. Remove eggplant, onions and mushrooms.

Bake zucchini 5-10 minutes longer or until edges are browned.

Sauté onion in a skillet with olive oil. Add in the tomatoes and spaghetti sauce. Let sit for about 5 minutes.

In a bowl, combine the ricotta cheese, Parmesan cheese and egg substitute. Spread about 1/4 cup pasta sauce in a 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking dish coated with nonstick cooking spray.

Layer with four lasagna noodles (noodles will overlap slightly), half of ricotta cheese mixture, half of vegetables, a third of pasta sauce and 2/3 cup mozzarella cheese. Sprinkle with half of basil. Repeat layers. Top with the remaining noodles and pasta sauce.

Cover and bake at 350 degrees F for 40 minutes. Uncover; sprinkle with remaining cheese. Bake 5-10 minutes longer or until edges are bubblyand cheese is melted. Let stand for 10 minutes before cutting.

Molded Fruit Salad          

===================

1 pkg. lemon Jell-O

1 c. hot water

1/2 c. creamy cottage cheese

1/2 c. broken walnut meats

1/2 c. maraschino cherries, quartered

1 c. crushed pineapple, well drained

1 c. heavy cream, whipped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water; chill until partially set. Fold in cottage cheese, whipped cream, walnuts, cherries, and pineapple. Pour into pan and chill until firm. Cut in squares and serve on lettuce.

Al Fuchsman's Mandel Bread

 

Al Fuchsman’s Mandel Bread

Source:  The Washington Post, November 28, 2007

  • • Cuisine: Eastern European
  • • Course: Dessert, Snack

Summary:

“Many cultures and cuisines have their own version of this crisp bread that is eaten as a cookie. Dotty Fuchsman says her husband’s is “world famous” because they have taken it to England and Israel.
The mandel bread can be stored in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks; the Fuchsmans prefer to wrap it well and freeze it for up to 2 months.”

Makes 64 to 100 slices/cookies

Ingredients:

• 1 cup canola oil, plus more for greasing the baking sheets (optional)

• 5 cups bread flour

• 2 tablespoons yellow cornmeal

• 1 cup sugar

• 1 teaspoon salt

• 2 teaspoons baking powder

• 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

• 1 cup whole raw unsalted almonds, cut into 3 pieces per nut

• 3/4 cup dried cranberries or raisins

• 5 large egg whites, plus 1 whole egg

• 2 teaspoons almond extract

• 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

• 1/3 cup water

• Juice of 1 medium lemon or lime (2 to 3 tablespoons)

• Cinnamon-sugar mixture, for sprinkling

 

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a large rimmed baking sheet with canola oil or nonstick cooking oil spray.

Combine the bread flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, almonds and dried cranberries or raisins in a large bowl.

Combine the egg whites, egg and oil in a separate bowl; blend well. Add the almond and vanilla extracts, water and citrus juice. Add to the bowl of dry ingredients; mix and knead the dough until it achieves the consistency of putty. Divide the dough into 4 equal portions and form them into bars on the baking sheet, roughly 3 inches by 12 inches by 3/4 inches thick, spaced apart so they do not touch. Bake for about 20 minutes, and then transfer the pan to a wire rack to cool for about 10 minutes; the bars will be warm and slightly set.

Meanwhile, position an oven rack 4 to 5 inches from the top broiling element and preheat the broiler. Have ready 2 large, same-size baking sheets.

Use a very sharp knife to cut the bars into 1/2-inch or 3/4-inch slices; there should be about 16 to 25 slices per bar. Working in batches, lay the bars flat on a baking sheet (about 36 should fit snugly on 1 sheet) and sprinkle with the cinnamon-sugar mixture. Toast under the broiler for 5 to 8 minutes or until the edges are brown and the sugar has melted. Remove from the oven and carefully place a second baking sheet on top of the toasted slices. Use oven mitts to hold the sheets together and carefully flip over; remove the top baking sheet so that the untoasted second sides of the slices are exposed. Sprinkle with the cinnamon-sugar mixture and return to broil for 5 to 8 minutes. Transfer the slices to a wire rack to cool thoroughly; the slices should be crisp.

Original Recipe Source:

From Annandale resident Al Fuchsman.

Nutritional Information:

66 calories, 3g fat, 0g saturated fat, 2mg cholesterol, 35mg sodium, 8g carbohydrates, 0g dietary fiber, n/a sugar, 1g protein.

I love brownies...all kinds of brownies!

Chewy Brownies

==============

Ingredients:

6 medium eggs, beaten

3 cups of sugar

2-1/4 cups of flour

1 cup of melted margarine

6 tablespoons of cocoa

2 teaspoons of vanilla

1-1/2 teaspoons of salt

1 teaspoon of baking powder

1 large packet of walnuts, broken

Preparation Instructions:

Combine the melted margarine, cocoa, and the sugar.  Add the six beaten eggs.

Mix together the flour, salt and baking powder and add to other mixture.  Add the vanilla and broken walnuts.

Bake in a greased and floured 18*12 inch jelly roll pan at 375°F (190°C) for 20 minutes.

Russian Tea Cookies...Yummy in my tummy!

Russian Tea Cookies

===================

1/2 cup Vegetable Shortening

2 cups Flour

4 tablespoons Sugar

1/2 cup Butter OR Margarine

2 teaspoons Vanilla Extract

1-1/2 cups Nuts; ground

Confectionary Sugar

Cream shortening, margarine and sugar. Add vanilla extract, flour and nuts. Form little balls of dough with teaspoon of batter. Place on UNGREASED cookie sheets.

Bake 30 minutes at 300 degrees. After cooling for 15 minutes, roll balls in confectionery sugar.

Makes 4 1/2 dozen cookies.

SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  These are delicious and addictive!!  I  first made this recipe for my eldest nephew, Dov’s, Bar Mitzvah. That was About 15 years ago if I did the math correctly, and I’ve been making them ever since.  I do suggest doubling the recipe.  You won’t regret it!  This is one of my all-time favorite cookies!  Recipe came from the “Rochester Hadassah Cookbook.”

 

I have to try this recipe, don't you?

Mini Pumpkin Spice Cupcakes with Cinnamon Chip Icing

 

“Simple, two ingredient recipe”.

 

1 box spice cake mix
1 15 oz. can pure pumpkin

Mix both ingredients together thoroughly and fill mini cupcake liners almost to the top. These cupcakes will not rise that much and will not shape naturally. Bake at 350 degrees for 12-15 minutes, checking with the toothpick test.

For the icing:

1 stick unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 1/2 – 3 cups powdered sugar, as needed
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 tbsp. honey
1 tbsp. cinnamon
4 oz. Hershey’s cinnamon chips, melted and cooled

Whip the butter on medium-high speed for 5 minutes, scraping the bowl when necessary. Reduce the speed to low and gradually add the powdered sugar. Once all of the powdered sugar is incorporated, increase the speed to medium-high and add the vanilla, honey, and cinnamon mixing until incorporated. Add the melted cinnamon chips and whip at medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes, scraping the bowl as needed. Then, ice the cupcakes!

Sprinkle with cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice.

Source: http://www.sprinklemassacre.com/2011/10/06/mini-pumpkin-spice-cupcakes/

NOTE FROM SOFTA123:  I apologize for not posting this article sooner but real life interrupted.  I hope that this will not happen again, but I know better than to say never!


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DO IT YOURSELF FORTUNE COOKIES

Posted on October 9, 2011. Filed under: Chinese Recipes, Cookies, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Fun, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Parve, Quotes, Rainy Day Foods, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , |


I don’t know about you, but I love fortune cookies, and I love reading the fortunes even better, so I decided to try my hand at writing some fortunes and I found a fortune cookie recipe on the net that I’m sharing here with you.  After reading the fortunes, why don’t you try your hand at writing some and share it with the rest of us.  You can do so by leaving a comment and I will edit them into this post with credit going to you for the fortune.  Let’s see how many we can come up with!  These are mine.

May you be blessed with good health, happiness and wealth. ~Marilyn Sultar

If you can’t do it the first time, take it apart and see how it works. ~Marilyn Sultar

If the baby talks too much, be glad for it. ~Marilyn Sultar

The glass is definitely half full.  May you be able to fill it up again. ~Marilyn Sultar

Stress is something that you don’t need in your life.  Simplify it. ~Marilyn Sultar

Listen to the music, dance, laugh and smell the roses so your life will be fuller. ~Marilyn Sultar

Take my advice because I don’t. ~Marilyn Sultar

Age is a gift.  Don’t regret those numbers whether they be low or high.  Live your age to the fullest! ~Marilyn Sultar

Bake yourself something special because you are special! ~Marilyn Sultar

Do you want to be Peter Pan or Wendy?  I’d choose Peter Pan if I were you. ~Marilyn Sultar

1 ray of sunshine, 1 moonbeam, 2 special people, 1 bouquet of balloons, 1 bottle of wine, 1 baguette, 1 bunch of seedless red grapes and an array of great cheeses.  Mix together and take to the park.  What a recipe for a great day!~Marilyn Sultar

If you find the road too curvy pull over and find as easier way. ~Marilyn Sultar

Don’t give life just a schmer of effort, give your all. ~Marilyn Sultar

You will find excitement tomorrow and the next day and everyday if you know where to find it! ~Marilyn Sultar

Don’t care more for your animals than you do for the human race. ~Marilyn Sultar

Don’t hide in front of your computer; get out into the real world no matter how much it hurts! ~Marilyn Sultar

Give one of your smiles away at least once a day.  Who knows, you might make a new friend! ~Marilyn Sultar

Sing me a song and let the music of your voice heal our little part of the world. ~Marilyn Sultar

Make a difference in the world, only you can do it! ~Marilyn Sultar

When life gives you fortune cookies, read them! ~Marilyn Sultar

The next fortunes I found on the net at http://www.chinese-fortune-cookie.com/fortune-cookie-quotes.html

Your heart is a place to draw true happiness.

If you want the rainbow, you must to put up with the rain. ~Dolly Parton

Pray for what you want, but work for the things you need.

The greatest danger could be your stupidity.

Love asks me no questions, and gives me endless support. ~William Shakespeare

Don’t forget, you are always on our minds.

And these are quotes that I have found on other places around the net that we can use for our fortune cookies:

Happiness is having a large, loving, caring, close-knit family in another city. ~George Burns

Am I not destroying my enemies when I make friends of them? ~ Abraham Lincoln

 

 

May You Have Only Good Fortune!

Fortune Cookies

=================

Submitted By: Aleta

Photo By: ShrinkingViolette

 

Servings: 6

 

“Write your own fortunes and place them in cookies. Great for parties.”

 

INGREDIENTS:

 

1 egg white

1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 pinch salt

1/4 cup unbleached all-purpose

Flour

1/4 cup white sugar

 

DIRECTIONS:

 

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Butter a cookie sheet. Write fortunes on strips of paper about 4 inches long and 1/2 inch wide. Generously grease 2 cookie sheets.

 

Mix the egg white and vanilla until foamy but not stiff. Sift the flour, salt, and sugar and blend into the egg white mixture.

 

Place teaspoonfuls of the batter at least 4 inches apart on one of the prepared cookie sheets. Tilt the sheet to move the batter into round shapes about 3 inches in diameter. Be careful to make batter as round and even as possible. Do not make too many, because the cookie have to be really hot to form them and once they cool it is too late. Start with 2 or 3 to a sheet and see how many you can do.

 

Bake for 5 minutes or until cookie has turned a golden color 1/2 inch wide around the outer edge of the circle. The center will remain pale.

While one sheet is baking, prepare the other.

 

Remove from oven and quickly move cookie with a wide spatula and place upside down on a wooden board. Quickly place the fortune on the cookie, close to the middle and fold the cookie in half. Place the folded edge across the rim of a measuring cup and pull the pointed edges down, one on the inside of the cup and one on the outside. Place folded cookies into the cups of a muffin tin or egg carton to hold their shape until firm.

 

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 6 Calories: 54 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 0.1g Cholesterol: 0mg Sodium: 74mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 12.4g Dietary Fiber: 0.1g Protein: 1.1g .

SOFTA’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  From the reviews I read for this recipe, which was given good ratings, you need to try your hand at the recipe and be prepared to  fail for at least the first time, if not the second and third.  Just try the original and see what happens, that’s what I’m going to do.

 I posted an earlier article entitled “YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 1” today, please check it out for more good break fast recipes, especially if you have been following my countdown series.  I did not post yesterday as it was Yom Kippur, therefore, I did one post for yesterday and this one for today!

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YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 1

Posted on October 9, 2011. Filed under: Chocolate, Chocolate Chip, Comfort Foods, Cookies, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Hope, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Paerve, Parve, Quotes, Rainy Day Foods, Recipes, Rochester, Tried and True Recipe, Yom Kippur | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


I think this quote plus our seven themes of Yom Kippur (Self-reflection, Forgiveness,  Remembering our past,  Honoring our ancestors,  Personal change,  Return to good values and ideal, and charity and putting values into action) sums up everything that the High Holidays are about.  I wish all of you a good atonement (I stole that from my friend, Michael Arvé), and an easy fast!

Here are the rest of the recipes for our Yom Kippur Break Fast:

Gladys Gooding’s Deluxe Chocolate Marshmallow Bars

==================================================

Ingredients:

BARS:

3/4 cup Margarine OR Butter

1-1/2 cups Granulated Sugar

3 large Eggs

1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

1-1/3 cups All-Purpose Flour

1/2 teaspoon Baking Powder

1/2 teaspoon Salt

3 tablespoons Baking Cocoa

1/2 cup Nuts; chopped

4 cups White Miniature Marshmallows

TOPPING:

1-1/3 cups Chocolate Chips

3 tablespoons Margarine OR Butter

1 cup Peanut Butter

2 cups Crisp Rice Cereal  (i.e. Rice Krispies)

Directions:

BARS:

PREHEAT oven to 350° Fahrenheit.

GREASE a 13″x9″x2″ pan.

Cream 3/4 cup butter and granulated sugar. Add eggs and vanilla extract; beat until fluffy.

Combine all-purpose flour, baking powder salt and baking cocoa.  Add to creamed mixture.  Stir in chopped nuts.

Spread batter into GREASED 13″x9x2″ pan.  Bake at 350° Fahrenheit for 15-18 minutes. Take pan out of oven and sprinkle marshmallows evenly over cake.  Return the cake to the oven for 2-3 minutes.

Using a knife dipped in water, spread the melted marshmallows evenly over the cake.  COOL.

TOPPING:

Combine chocolate chips, butter and peanut butter in a small saucepan. Cook over LOW heat, stirring CONSTANTLY, until melted and well blended.

Remove from heat; stir in cereal.  Spread over bars.  Chill.

SOFTA123’S AKAMARILYN’S NOTES:

For the topping, I would combine chocolate chips, butter and peanut butter in a MICROWAVE SAFE POT OR BIG BOWL.  I would heat in microwave for 1 minute on HIGH, stir and if not all melted and smooth, I would put into microwave for another 30 seconds.  Stir and repeat until everything is melted and smooth, and mixed together thoroughly.

Gladys Gooding, a friend from the Monroe County Branch of the New York  State Home Bureau made this for our annual pot-luck picnic in August of 1994.  These bars were the HIT of the picnic!  I just fell in love with them. I have not made this recipe yet. Gladys belonged to the Bayview Chapter and I belonged to the Nosheri Too chapter, which I began.

The Fleddels will not be this high!!!

 

 

 

FLEDDELS

===============

SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  This is the BEST recipe I have ever gotten anywhere (except my family’s and my friends’ recipes, of course!)!!!  You have got to try making these.  When you cut them, don’t cut in wedges, cut into squares, diamonds or rectangles.  I made this recipe in two disposable pie pans.  BE WARE!  These are so good I can eat one batch in a sitting!!!

Fleddel Ingredients

3 cups Flour

1 tablespoon Lemon Juice

3/4 teaspoon Grated Lemon Rind

2 teaspoons Baking Powder

1 tablespoon Grated Orange Rind

1/2 teaspoon Salt (but I always use half)

3 Eggs

1-1/2 cups Thick Jam

1 cup Sugar

1-1/2 cups Raisins

1-1/2 cups coarsley chopped Walnuts

2 tablespoons Vegetable Oil

1 tablespoon Sugar mixed with

3/4 teaspoon Ground Cinnamon

Instructions for Fleddel

Sift flour, baking powder, salt and sugar together. Beat eggs slightly; add to flour. Add oil, lemon rind, lemon juice and orange rind. Mix with WOODEN SPOON to combine, and if necessary, use your hands to finish mixing the dough and to shape it into a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill thoroughly.

Cut the ball into 6 portions; parts not used leave in refrigerator.

Roll out 1 portion at a time on a floured board; roll to fit an 8 inch pie pan* so that the dough comes up at sides but not over rim.

Spread the dough with 1/2 cup jam, 1/2 cup raisins and 1/2 cup nuts.

Roll out another portion of dough to form the top. Wet edges of dough with water and seal with a fork. Either wet the fork or dip fork into flour as you go, whichever works best as a seal for you.

Refrigerate as you work the other two pies.

Before baking, sprinkle tops with sugar-cinnamon mixture. Bake in medium 350° Fahrenheit oven for 30 minutes or until lightly browned.

RUTH’S NOTE:  “Fleddel freezes beautifully. I sometimes use a rectangle pan – a jelly roll pan will work. Then you only make 1 large fleddel.”

ORIGINAL SOURCE:  Posted to JEWISH-FOOD digest V97 #011 From: sybel@ix.netcom.com (Ruth Donenfeld) Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 21:59:43 -0700

 

This Mandel Bread Will Be Yummy!!!

 

Mandel Bread

========================

1-1/4 cups Sugar

1 cup Peanut Oil

4 Eggs; at room temperature

3-1/2 cups Flour

2 teaspoons Baking Powder; (heaping teaspoon)

1 teaspoon Salt

2 teaspoons Vanilla OR 1 teaspoon Vanilla AND 1 teaspoon Orange Juice*

1-1/2 cups Nuts or Coconut*

Sliced Almonds

*SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  I use chocolate chips instead of nuts and/or coconut. Also, I use the vanilla and orange juice–1 tsp. each.

Sift flour, baking powder and salt. Beat eggs until fluffy and pale.

Add sugar, oil, and flavoring. Add sifted dry ingredients. Add nuts or coconut. Flour board and shape dough into strips 2 1/2-3″, or scoop with large cooking spoon directly on UNGREASED cookie sheet and shape into strips with fingers. (SOFTA’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  I use scoop method.)

Decorate with sliced almonds or coconut or sugar. Bake at 350 degrees-375 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until golden brown. Remove and slice in desired size and then lay slices on their sides on cookie sheets. Use extra cookie sheets, if necessary. (SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  I always find it necessary!!) Crisp slices in the oven for 5-10 minutes on each side.

Pack in wax paper in tin or glass containers. Keeps for weeks. (SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  I freeze in Tupperware!!)

SUGGESTION: Save crumbs to use in strudel or kuchen.

This is my favorite recipe for Mandel Bread. I first made it for Rosh Hashanna in 1973. This recipe comes from the newer edition of the “Rochester Hadassah Cookbook.”  ~SOFTA123 AKA Marilyn

I am posting another article after this one as this would have been yesterday’s post. So look for DO IT YOURSELF FORTUNE COOKIES ~ SOFTA123

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YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 4

Posted on October 5, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Change, Comfort Foods, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Rainy Day Foods, Recipes, Sour Cream, Yom Kippur | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |


Personal Change is another theme of Yom Kippur…personal change and a return to values and  ideals that you know are right.  Are those two themes contradictory or are they the same?  Hmmm, I wonder.   I just read a great post about personal change and the High Holidays.  I am copying it right here with the express permission of the website and writer.  This is very generous and I hope you will go to their website to check it out.  The name of the website is Positive Articles and here is the link http://www.positivearticles.com .

The High Holy Days: A Time of Personal Change and Spiritual Return

 

 by Nina Amir

As the leaves on the trees begin to turn, local Jews, as well as Jews all over the world begin the process of t’shuvah, a Hebrew word meaning repentance which comes from the root “to turn or return.” For them, autumn ushers in the High Holy Days, during which they turn their attention away from the distractions of everyday life and toward God, away from outward denial of wrongdoing and toward acknowledgement of sins, away from unwanted behavior and toward repentance.  At this time of year, change is in the air for Jews all around the world.

The High Holy Days include Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, and Yom Kippur, the Day of Repentance.  Thus, this period marks the joyous beginning of a new year as well as a somber period of introspection. However, preparations for the “Days of Awe” – the period between Rosh Hashanah and the end of Yom Kippur, begin on September 8 with the observance of Selichot, a late evening or nighttime service involving the recitation of penitential prayers.  Many Jews take time both with their community and on their own to begin the process of evaluating their own behavior over the past year on this night, and then continue doing so until the last sound of the shofar, the ram’s horn traditionally blown on this holiday, at sundown on Yom Kippur.

Although some Jews observe Selichot for a full month prior to Rosh Hashanah, others begin their observance approximately a week before the start of this holiday. In either case, this religious observance might be likened to a “warm up” for the High Holidays, my old Rabbi Steven Bob of Congregation Etz Chaim in Lombard, once told me.  “Before you go running, you want to stretch a little bit. This is spiritual stretching.  The Selichot service introduces the theme and melodies of the High Holy Days while also stressing God’s royalty and our modest position.  We recognize that God is judging us, but…we don’t want justice, we want mercy,” said Bob.

Selichot marks the first time during the High Holidays that Jews hear the shofar blown. Much symbolism surrounds the blowing of the shofar, but it is most commonly seen as a wake-up call.  Likened to an alarm clock, the shofar says, “Wake up and take a look at the way you’ve been living, and do something about it.” Blowing the shofar on Rosh Hashanah represents a call to return to God. During the year, we tend to stray from the path or get distracted, and we have to come back, turn towards God once again.

At the conclusion of the Selichot service, Jews have a week to begin their self-assessment before Rosh Hashanah.  Although this holiday is a joyous one, it does mark the beginning of 10 days of introspection and repentance.  On Rosh Hashanah the liturgy speaks of people “being written in the Book of Life.”  If they sincerely repent for sins and rectify wrongs from the last year, on Yom Kippur their names are “sealed” in the Book.  If they do not, their names are erased. While this language can be seen as a liturgical poetic image, it serves to remind Jews that what we do counts whether it is well known or whether it is secret. With our deeds, we write on the pages of our own Book of Life.

The Book of Life also provides a beautiful metaphor that reminds us we are fragile and don’t know whether we will survive the year or not.  Should we not survive, it seems a good idea to atone before meeting God and facing whatever fate lies before us.

The stress on being written in the Book of Life also allows Jews to think about the fact that our fate is not sealed forever, that we have an active role in what the future may bring us. Judaism has a doctrine of fee will; thus, we not pawns that play out Divine Will.  The Yom Kippur liturgy stresses this fact, repeating over and over again that repentance, prayer and just actions can avert the severity of the decree.

Change YOUR Channel!

We don’t often think of change as easy.  It seems easier to stay the way we are and where we are.  Yet, change is inevitable and often forced upon us. At this time of year, the Jewish tradition doesn’t force us to change but asks us to change.  We are reminded of the necessity of change – change for the better.

We can see this as an obligation.  We can see it as an opportunity.

Either way, the Jewish New Year offers us a chance – for some of us a second chance in addition to the secular New Year – to look at ourselves, our relationships and our lives and to set new goals, to create new priorities and to make amends for the wrongs we might have consciously or unconsciously, purposefully or accidentally committed over the past 12 months. This, too, can be difficult – to honestly look at ourselves and our deeds.  If we are willing to do the work, however, the period from Selichot to Yom Kippur provides a chance for t’shuvah, to turn towards what we want in our selves, in our lives and in the world, to return to our best selves. It’s a time to write our life for the coming year, to envision the year as we would like it to be and ourselves as we would like to become. And then when we hear the shofar blown in those last moments of Yom Kippur, we know that change has descended upon us. Or, more accurately, we have brought change upon ourselves

Nina Amir, a writer, motivational speaker, workshop leader, and Kabbalistic conscious creation coach, teamed up with Karen Stone, a life and love coach, writer, speaker, and workshop leader to publish “Planting Seeds of Change…And Watching Them Grow.” They co-lead a 4-part Teleseminar Series based on their booklet. The next series begins on September 6th. To enroll, visit http://www.purespiritcreations.com.or call 408-353-1943 or 770-435-2030.

I have been doing a lot of thinking about changing my life and turning it back around.  I have decided that after the holidays I am going to make three changes in my life.  First, I am going to choose a charity project, then I will begin once more to get my house in order and I am going to return to better eating habits.  Possibly, I may even throw some exercise (YUK!) in!!!  I’m not making promises, but I am at least going to try to do these things.  If I fail, well, maybe someone will GENTLY help me get back on track.  I know I can’t go on living the way I have for the past three years.

So how does one change?   First you have to have a self improvement plan and a system for your personal development and growth. Then you need to take consistent and continuous action. When you know in which direction you want to go, you will work on yourself, do all that you can and do your best. This is self help. And you will change and grow.


  •       Identify what is in your control to change.
  •       Identify your options.
  •       Create a support system.
  •       Examine your attitude.
  •       Remain flexible.
  •       Give yourself a break.
  •       Strive to achieve balance and perspective.

Remember, “You must take personal responsibility. You cannot change the circumstances, the seasons, or the wind, but you can change yourself.”~ Jim Rohn Quotes

The above quote is a good one.  If you think about that quote, it will make you remember that you can’t blame anyone for your life.   You’ve made your choices, so you have to blame yourself.  For example, you are really upset with your boyfriend today so YOU decide to splurge on a pint of ice cream, you cannot blame the “fall off the wagon” on him.  It was YOUR decision to “fall off the wagon, not his. And ok, so you “fell off the wagon” today.  Don’t punish yourself, just get back on that wagon and take it day-by-day.  Soon your preferred behavior will become habit and you will make the changes that you want to make.

If you want to make lifestyle changes that last, you must be open to changing it up and not necessarily reusing the same tired plan of attack. Be open to new approaches and to the idea that you might not get to the finish line in the exact way you are currently imagining. In fact, it might even be easier and more fun than you are planning on.

A good example of changing a life style and making it last is when I tried to quit smoking.  I had tried going cold turkey, I tried acupuncture and I tried cutting back.  None of these methods worked for me.  Then one day my Dad said that he would buy me a computer if I quit smoking within a month.  My husband said he would sweeten the deal and buy the printer.  I wanted that computer very badly!  So my husband suggested that I use the filter method to quit smoking.  I did and I had, as the directions suggested, a quitting partner.  The bribery and the filters worked!  To maintain the habit of NOT smoking, my Dad said that if I reverted to smoking, the computer would be his!  To this day, I have been smoke free…that was almost 15 years ago now.  Do I crave cigarettes still?  Yes, but I remember how hard it was to give up the habit so I try not to think about it.  Also, I’m still afraid someone will take my computer away, and I’m hooked on the computer habit!  Good luck on whatever you choose to do to make a positive change this year!  Let me know how you are doing, I’ll be very interested in hearing your stories, success stories, I hope!

Today’s sour cream cake recipe:

Cinnamon Crumb Cake

Cinnamon Crumb Cake

===================

If you like crumb topping as much as cake, this recipe’s for you. A thick layer of cinnamon-spiced crumb topping sits atop coffee cake that starts with a cake mix.

Makes 24 servings.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes

INGREDIENTS

2 cups flour
1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons McCormick® Cinnamon, Ground
1 cup (2 sticks) cold butter, cut into chunks
1 package (18 1/4 ounce) white cake mix
1 egg
1 cup sour cream
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, melted
1 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla Extract

DIRECTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix flour, sugars and cinnamon in large bowl.  Cut in cold butter with pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Set aside.

2. Beat cake mix, egg, sour cream, melted butter and vanilla in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed about 1 minute or just until mixed.

3. Spread evenly in greased and floured 13×9-inch baking pan. Sprinkle evenly with topping mixture.

4. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until cake pulls away from sides of pan.

Cool on wire rack. Cut into squares to serve.

Tips

To make a Blueberry Crumb Cake: Prepare topping and batter as directed. Spread batter in baking pan. Sprinkle with 1 cup blueberries, then the topping mixture. Bake 45 minutes.

NUTRITION INFORMATION – per serving

Calories: 265

Fat: 13 g

Carbohydrates: 34 g

Cholesterol: 41 mg

Sodium: 226 mg

Fiber: 1 g

Protein: 3 g

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YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 5

Posted on October 4, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Cherries, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Family, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Recipes, Sour Cream, Yom Kippur | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |


The theme running through Yom Kippur that I like the best is remembering and honoring our ancestors.  In our busy daily lives, we often don’t take the time to remember those we cherish who are no longer with us.  We don’t take the time to remember those past generations that we might not have had a personal recollection of but who are a factor in who we are.

Yizkor-Remember

In Judaism, a memorial service, called Yizkor (meaning “remember”), is recited as part of the prayer service four times during the year. This is based on the Jewish belief in the eternity of the soul. Although a soul can no longer do good deeds after death, it can gain merit through the charity and good deeds of the living.[1]  It is a proven fact that more people attend services on Yom Kippur Day than any other time of the year because Yizkor is said on Yom Kippur.  In the synagogues, not only do we pick up a prayer book and a Chumash  (Jewish scriptures are sometimes bound in a form that corresponds to the division into weekly readings (called parshiyot in Hebrew). Scriptures bound in this way are generally referred to as a Chumash.), but we also pick up a pamphlet that gives the names of the congregation’s deceased and a form to fill out for charity.

In many, if not all, the synagogues, you will find a large plaque with the names of deceased loved ones of the congregation and next to it will be a lit light bulb, and in our homes we light a Yahrzeit (memorial) candle or plug in one of the more modern Yahrzeit lamps that is left on from Erev Yom Kippur (the night before Yom Kippur Day) until we end our fast on Yom Kippur at sundown.  We do this in honor of our beloved ancestors, especially for a parent, a grandparent or a child as we believe that the candle flame symbolizes the human soul.  We only light one candle that includes everyone.

History is of the utmost importance in Judaism. Whereas the sacred texts of most ancient religions focus on myths and philosophical concepts, the Jewish Bible is centered on historical narrative; and most Jewish holidays are intended to connect modern Jews with their historical ancestors and traditions.  We see this most acutely on Yom Kippur when we remember our own recent history.

We remember our ancestors during the year in others ways too.  If there is a birth, the baby is named after a deceased relative.  We do this because people believed that if they would not name their children after their ancestors, their heritage would be forgotten. Naming children for the grandparents (which is normal but a baby can be named for any deceased ancestor) fosters a sense of continuity and purpose.

At Passover we recall our ancestor’s Exodus from Egypt and their journey to the Promised land.  As children we are told bible stories which tell the history of our people.  Each time the Torah is read, we remember those of biblical times that came before us.

But the best way to remember and honor our ancestors is to practice charity in whatever way we are able to.  We should strive to be the best person we can be so we can live up to their expectations of us.  We may fail, but if we at least try, that is a mitzvah (a good deed).

So, this year, as you sit around the table at your break fast, tell family stories, remember and pass those stories down to the next generation and remind your own generation of stories that may link them to you whether you know it or not.

This year, I will take the time to remember my beloved father, my grandparents, my aunts and uncles who are no longer with us.  I will remember my cousin, Roger, who died way too young, and I will remember my best friend, Beverly Clark.  I will remember my friends Sam & Florence Vyner, Elaine Rubin, Sam Goldstein and Florence Epstein.  I will remember those that died during the Holocaust at the hands of Adolph Hitler and the Nazi Party.  I will remember those martyrs that died because they were Jewish.  I will remember those who have fought to protect our freedom and our country in all the wars that we have been involved in.  I will remember those who died on September 11, 2001. May they all rest in peace.  Amen.

To help sweeten the remembrance of these special people, I offer you this sour cream cake recipe:

Sour Cream and Cherry Coffee Cake

Sour Cream & Cherry Coffee Cake

===============================

1 – 18 oz package white cake mix

1 – 8 oz container sour cream

3 – eggs

1/4 – cup water

1 – 21 oz can Lucky Leaf cherry pie filling

1/4 – cup sliced almonds, optional

Preheat oven to 350. Lightly grease a jelly-roll pan or 9 x 13 inch baking pan.

Mix together the sour cream, eggs and water. Combine with the cake mix. Spread mixture into a greased baking dish and drop the pie filling over the batter in spoonfuls. Make sure to swirl the pie filling throughout the batter. If not the pie filling will settle in the middle.

Bake for 30-40 minutes or until lightly browned and cooked through. Test with toothpick for doneness. Cool in pan and drizzle with a simple icing if desired.

Simple Icing

1 ½ – cups powdered sugar

2 – tablespoons milk

½ – teaspoon vanilla or almond extract

Blend all the ingredients together until smooth. Drizzle over coffee cake and garnish with sliced almonds.

 

 

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YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 7

Posted on October 2, 2011. Filed under: Bananas, Cakes, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Recipes, Sour Cream, Yom Kippur | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |


A theme that is central to Yom Kippur is forgiveness.  I think this is one of the most difficult themes we have to deal with throughout the High Holidays as well as throughout our lives.  “Forgiveness” is defined as :

1. The act of forgiving or the state of being forgiven[1]

2. willingness to forgive[2]

A Mothers Kisses by Jared Kendall

A Mother’s Kisses by Jared Kendall

(God) pardons like a mother who kisses away the repentant tears of her child —Henry Ward Beecher

“The overarching theme of Yom Kippur is repentance. During the holiday all thoughts are supposed to be centered on this theme. From Kol Nidrei to the repeated Viddui to Neilah, the day revolves around the theme of communal repentance for sins committed during the past year, in order that both the community and the individual be inscribed in the Book of Life for the coming year.”[3]

“There are two distinct relationships in Judaism: person to person and person to God. To atone for deeds committed against another person, Jewish tradition teaches, you must confront that person directly and apologize. Yom Kippur will address the impact that deed had on your relationship with God, but without the personal apology, the deed remains uncorrected. This element of the day often leads to difficult self-assessments and personal accountability for the choices made in the previous year.”[4]

I find it very easy to ask G-d for forgiveness, but I am not sure he forgives me or not.  Some years I really wonder.  I also am not confident at this point that I know how to truly ask him or anyone else for forgiveness and I’m not sure I know how to be truly repentant.  I wonder if it is the same feeling for the criminal who wants to repent his crime.  Perhaps he/she is truly wishing to repent but does not know how.  What does that person do and how does he/she approach G-d for forgiveness?

We are taught by the Rabbis that repentance is the prerequisite of atonement.  So, without repentance there is no forgiveness, but we are given chance upon chance upon chance to repent.  Every day we can repent, not only during the High Holy Days, and not only during Yom Kippur.

Rabbinic Jewish literature contains extensive discussions on the subject of repentance. Many rabbinic sources state that repentance is of paramount importance to the existence of this world, so that it was one of the seven provisions which G-d made before the Creation (Talmud Bavli, tractates Pesahim 54a; Nedarim 39b; Midrash Genesis Rabbah 1).”[5]

It is too bad that repentance doesn’t work with countries.  Perhaps, if it did, there would be fewer wars.  But, countries are made out of people, and it seems that the people in charge don’t want to repent or don’t think they need to repent.   Perhaps if they really cared and if they really understood the 10 Commandments and their religion’s version of the Bible, there wouldn’t be so many wars.  Taken on a purely personal basis, perhaps there would be fewer divorces and torn apart families.  And perhaps neighborhoods would be safer places to live in.

In Order To Repent You Need To Turn Your Behavior Around!

G-d saw the importance of forgiveness so why can’t we practice it more?  I know it hurts to admit to being wrong.  I know we would like to think of ourselves as perfection.  I know that it can be humiliating to ask for forgiveness.  But we need to try.  We need to focus on our actions not just on the words, “I am sorry.”  The core of a true apology is the recognition of injury or wrong-doing, and a genuine expression of repentance for it. You have to recognize and admit the wrong-doing; and you have to be genuinely sorry.  Let go of the wrongs, let go of the engrained patterns — forgive and be forgiven.
I have an idea.  Try to truly forgive one person this year.  That is a good starting place.  Then next year try to ask forgiveness from someone you have wronged.  To start off, I ask anyone whom I have offended in any way during the past 64 years of my life to please forgive me.  I will try harder this year to be a better person.  So, here, publicly, I forgive Bonnie Stoler, a girl who I went to grammar school with who was not very nice to me.  I am finally going to let go of my grudge against her.  Please, Bonnie, if you are reading this, and I hope you are, I forgive you.

To help sweeten my apology, I am offering this recipe:

Bananas Yummmm!

Banana-Sour Cream Coffee Cake

=============================

Yield: 1 (10-inch) coffee cake

Ingredients

1-1/4 cups sugar, divided

1/2 cup chopped pecans

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 cup butter or margarine, softened

2 large eggs

1 cup mashed banana

1/2 cup sour cream

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon salt

Preparation

Stir together 1/4 cup sugar, pecans, and cinnamon; sprinkle half of mixture in a well-greased 12-cup Bundt pan. Set remaining mixture aside.

Beat butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy;

gradually add remaining 1 cup sugar, beating 5 to 7 minutes. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating just until yellow disappears.

Add banana, sour cream, and vanilla, beating at low speed just until blended.

Combine flour and next 3 ingredients; fold into butter mixture.

Pour half of batter into prepared pan; sprinkle with remaining pecan mixture. Top with remaining batter. Bake at 350° for 45 minutes or until a long wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean.

Cool in pan on a wire rack 10 minutes; remove from pan, and cool on wire rack.

Source:  Mrs. H.W. Walker, Richmond, Virginia, Southern Living OCTOBER 1997


[2] Ibid.

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YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 8

Posted on October 1, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Recipes, Rochester, Sour Cream, Yom Kippur | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |


YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 8

Reflections

Figure 1 Winter Reflections by Josephine Wall

I hope everyone had a wonderful Rosh Hashanah! In reflecting on Yom Kippur I know it has always been the least favorite of my holidays. Why? Because I had to fast and I had to go to shul for a whole day and be bored and not at all where I wanted to be. My mind always wandered during services and until I was an adult I fled at sermon time. It wasn’t until Rabbi Shamai Kanter of Temple Beth El in Rochester, New York entered my life (I credit him with bringing me back to Judaism and giving me the knowledge that not all Rabbis are bad.) that I really listened to a sermon. But I had respect for him (and I had none for most of the Rabbis I had come into contact with in my lifetime). The first time I heard his sermon for Yom Kippur I couldn’t believe how cool this Rabbi was. He made me listen because his sermons always featured a movie he had seen. So year to year I would wonder what movie he would talk about this year and how would he tailor it to his theme. He never disappointed me! But, I mostly looked forward to going home, having a cigarette or two or lots more, and taking a nap before I would break my fast at 4:00 p.m. I would not fast any longer than that. And then, at 4:00 p.m. the holiday really began for me as I set up the trays and serving dishes with holiday delights so that my parents and their friends could have a pleasant break fast. I was very sad when my Mom decided that it wasn’t worth doing because no one every reciprocated and money was tight in our household. A few years later we would go over to the house of one of my parents new friends and join her wonderful break fasts.

When I got to college, I hosted my own break fasts if I couldn’t get home for the holidays. I was often the only Jew there, but I wanted to share my holidays with my friends. I continued this tradition when I got married. We would have a house-full of friends and family members and the attendees were 50% Jewish and & 50% Jewish. I would set out lots of goodies and everyone ate well. So, in remembering the pleasure I got from feeding everyone after fasting for however long they did, I don’t think I really minded Yom Kippur.

One of the themes of Yom Kippur is self-reflection. According to Wikipedia,

“Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself. Human self-reflection invariably leads to inquiry into the human condition and the essence of humankind as a whole.”

I think that by keeping this blog, I do open myself to self-reflection. I try to be honest with myself and you, my readers. Therefore I sometimes open my eyes to things about myself I never really thought about or realized before. But, I didn’t realize that that was the role of Yom Kippur in the life of a Jew. I just assumed that it was all about self-denial and asking G-d to forgive us (as in me) for who knows what sins. Oh yes, I could enumerate on my sins while I was in temple. I could name them and ask forgiveness for them. But, they were not the deeper, most important truths and sins. I don’t think I ever really understood that it was only the sins against G-d that I was supposed to be asking for and via that mechanism, I might find a way to ask for forgiveness from fellow human beings whom I had wronged in one-way-or-another. It is very hard to ask for forgiveness, but we’ll cover that in another post. Now, as I am reading more, I am looking at Yom Kippur’s self-reflection in a different manner. I am looking at it as a journey to G-d and to me. I am going to begin a private journal for that purpose and I am going to look for just one way to make a difference in the world. Just one. If I can find that one thing, it is a start. I have decided that the one thing I will do this year is to do a volunteer project. I haven’t decided upon one yet, but this is something I just decided, so between now and the end of Yom Kippur, I will make a decision. I am not going to promise G-d this, just in case I fail in carrying this task out. I will not make a deal with G-d that “if you forgive me, I will do this,” as I don’t want to make light of his more important works. So, I will keep you abreast of my quest .

Now, for the big reveal of how I will commemorate this countdown, I have decided to include a sour cream cake recipe for each day of the Yom Kippur countdown and thought I would start the countdown recipes with this easy to make sour cream cake recipe:

We have the pan ready, now we need to pour the batter into it...

Sour Cream Bundt Cake
=====================
Submitted By: Sue Smith

Servings: 12

“This recipe is great for both yellow and chocolate flavored cakes! It makes a Light, fluffy, and SERIOUSLY moist cake.”

INGREDIENTS:

1 (18.25 ounce) package yellow cake mix
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup sour cream
1/8 cup confectioners’ sugar for dusting

DIRECTIONS:

Make the batter following the directions on the box, EXCEPT replace 2 teaspoons water with an equal amount of vanilla. Fold in sour cream.

Bake according to directions given for baking a Bundt cake. Cool on
rack, place on serving plate, and dust with confectioners’ sugar.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 12

Calories: 234 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 9g Cholesterol: 9mg Sodium: 293mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 35.8g Dietary Fiber: 0.5g Protein: 2.5g

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