THANKSGIVING – #9

Posted on November 23, 2011. Filed under: Alcoholic, Apples, Apricots, Autumn, Coconut, Cranberries, Crock Pot-Slow Cooker, Dairy, Dinner/Supper, Gravies, Honey, Kosher Recipe, Lemons, Marshmallows, Meat, Nuts, Oranges, Pears, Pineapple, Poultry, THANKSGIVING, Thanksgiving Recipes, Tried and True Recipe, Vegetables | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


Often in everyone’s life, things don’t quite as smoothly as we’d like them to go, and that is the reason I haven’t blogged for the past few days.  I am afraid that for the next month blogging will be a hit and miss thing for me.  So, this post will be a long one as I’m combining many courses into it.  I do hope you enjoy these recipes and my family wishes you and your family a Happy, Healthy, Smooth Sailing Thanksgiving and hope that your turkey is moist and flavorful!  Love, Softa123

I am starting today’s blog with cranberry sauce as you can make it before Thanksgiving Day and store it in an air-tight plastic container.  I think this recipe for Cranberry Sauce Extraordinaire is one I’d like to try.  It sounds yummmmy!

Cranberry Sauce Extraordinaire

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Rated: 5 Stars

Submitted By: Leeza

Photo By: Tricia

Prep Time: 10 Minutes

Cook Time: 35 Minutes

Ready In: 45 Minutes

Servings: 12

“A variety of fresh and dried fruits and nuts are used in this cooked cranberry sauce. Serve with turkey.” ~ Leeza

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup water

1 cup white sugar

1 (12 ounce) package fresh Cranberries

1 orange, peeled and pureed

1 apple – peeled, cored and diced

1 pear – peeled, cored and diced

1 cup chopped dried mixed fruit

1 cup chopped pecans

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

DIRECTIONS:

In a medium saucepan, boil water and sugar until the sugar dissolves. Reduce the heat to simmer, and stir in cranberries, pureed orange, apple, pear, dried fruit, pecans, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Cover, and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the cranberries burst. Remove from heat, and let cool to room temperature.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 12

Calories: 132 Amount Per

Serving Total Fat: 0.2g Cholesterol: 0mg Sodium: 101mg Amount Per

Serving Total Carbs: 34.2g Dietary Fiber: 2.5g Protein: 0.6g

The title of this next recipe says it all…not only is it an easy recipe, but the addition of rum will definitely make some people happy, although if there are going to be children present, I would not add the rum.

{Simple And Amazing} Cranberry Sauce Recipe   

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Recipe type: Condiment

Author: Savory Sweet Life

Prep time: 2 mins

Cook time: 15 mins

Total time: 17 mins

Serves: 2 cups

“Make your own homemade cranberry sauce this year for Thanksgiving using fresh Cranberries. This easy recipe is so simple yet yields amazing cranberry sauce.”

Ingredients:

12 ounces bag fresh cranberries

3/4 cup orange juice

2/3 cup brown sugar

1/3 cup white sugar

Optional: 2 oz gold rum

Instructions:

Place all the ingredients in a sauce pan and cook on medium-high for 15-20 minutes or until most of the liquid has reduced – stirring occasionally. You’ll hear the cranberries popping – don’t worry, that’s what you want them to do. Remove from heat and serve.

Cranberry sauce can be made days ahead and brought to room temperature or slightly heated before serving.

I love Alton Brown.  He is my very favorite TV food guru.  The following is his recipe and I am including it for those who like a more jelloie (like that word that I just coined?) consistency.  It looks nicer than the canned stuff and I’m willing to be it tastes better too!

Cranberry Sauce

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Recipe courtesy Alton Brown, 2007

Prep Time:10 min

Inactive Prep Time:6 hr 0 min

Cook Time:20 min

Level:  Easy

Serves:  6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

1 pound fresh cranberries, approximately 4 cups

1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

1/4 cup 100 percent cranberry juice, not cocktail

1 cup honey

Directions

Wash the cranberries and discard any that are soft or wrinkled.  Combine the orange juice, cranberry juice and honey in a 2 quart saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the cranberries and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the cranberries burst and the mixture thickens. Do not cook for more than 15 minutes as the pectin will start to break down and the sauce will not set as well.

Remove from the heat and allow to cool for 5 minutes.

Carefully spoon the cranberry sauce into a 3 cup mold. Place in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours and up to overnight.

To unmold and serve, immerse bottom of mold in hot water for 10 to 15 seconds and turn upside down on plate or serving dish. If necessary, carefully run a warm knife around the edge of the mold.

Most American families include a string bean casserole in their Thanksgiving menu.  I like it too, but here are some kicked up string bean casseroles that sound more interesting than the traditional recipe for it.  If you don’t like cream of mushroom soup, you can always substitute cream of celery soup in these recipes.  I am an anti-mushroom person, and that is what I do.

Never Enough Green Bean Casserole

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Submitted By: Deb Dessaint

Photo By: Ms. Ho

Servings: 6

“This is NOT your usual plain green bean casserole. This is a recipe that started with my great-aunt and has been passed around our family for years.

People tasting it for the first time ALWAYS want the recipe!”  ~Deb Dessaint

INGREDIENTS:

1 (10 ounce) can condensed Cream of mushroom soup

3 ounces processed cheese (i.e. Velveeta®), cubed

1 tablespoon real bacon bits

1 (4 ounce) can mushroom stems and pieces, drained

2 (15 ounce) cans cut green beans , drained

1 (2.8 ounce) can French-fried Onions

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).

Heat the undiluted cream of mushroom soup in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the processed cheese and bacon, and continue stirring until completely melted. Remove from the heat, stir in the mushrooms, then the green beans until evenly coated. Pour the mixture into a casserole dish, and top with the fried onions, leaving a 1 inch margin around the sides.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes in the preheated oven, until heated through and bubbly. Check near the end of cooking to make sure the onions aren’t getting too brown.

FOOTNOTES: Note this recipe uses the submitter’s substitution in place of a bacon cheese spread, as it is not widely available. If the bacon cheese spread is available, use 1 (5 ounce) jar in place of the processed cheese and bacon in this recipe.

Tasty Green Bean Casserole

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Submitted By: ANDYKNEPPER

Photo By: MORUPE

Prep Time: 5 Minutes

Cook Time: 35 Minutes

Ready In: 40 Minutes

Servings: 8

“Delicious and easy to make variation of the bland holiday favorite. Green beans in a creamy white wine sauce with bacon and mozzarella cheese. Warning:  They’ll make you bring it every year!”

INGREDIENTS:

1 (16 ounce) package frozen whole

Green beans, thawed

4 slices bacon

1/2 medium onion, chopped

1/2 red bell pepper, seeded and diced

1/4 cup dry white wine or vermouth

1/4 cup milk

2 tablespoons butter

1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of mushroom soup

1 tablespoon soy sauce

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

1/2 cup canned French fried onions

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).

Fry bacon in a skillet over medium-high heat until crisp. Drain on paper towels, crumble, and set aside. Drain most of the bacon grease from the pan, and place over medium heat. Add the onions and bell pepper; cook and stir until tender. Stir in the wine, scraping all of the bits of bacon from the bottom of the pan.

Mix in the butter, milk, soup, and soy sauce. Season with salt and pepper. Stir in the green beans and bacon until evenly coated. Fold in cheese, then transfer to a 9×13 inch baking dish. Sprinkle with French fried onions.

Bake uncovered for 25 minutes in the preheated oven, until heated through, and sauce is bubbly.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 8

Calories: 225 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 15.4g Cholesterol: 18mg

Sodium: 702mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 14.3g Dietary Fiber: 1.7g

Protein: 5.3g

Green Bean Casserole

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Submitted By: pearl

Photo By: Lovemyfamily09

Prep Time: 5 Minutes

Cook Time: 30 Minutes

Ready In: 35 Minutes

Servings: 4

“Green beans, cream of mushroom soup, and French fried onions make for a classic green bean casserole. An absolute must at American holiday meals!”

INGREDIENTS:

1 (14.5 ounce) can French style green beans, drained

1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of mushroom soup

1 (6 ounce) can French-fried onions

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Combine green beans and soup in a small casserole dish.

Bake in a 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) oven for 10 to 15 minutes.  Remove from oven and top with the onions. Bake for another 10 minutes and serve.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 4

Calories: 366 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 26.8g Cholesterol: < 1mg

Sodium: 1223mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 27.1g Dietary Fiber:

1.1g Protein: 2.1g

What would Thanksgiving be without sweet potatoes or yams?  It is the only time of the year that I will eat them, but I am going to change that as I read an article that said it was the best type of potatoes for nutritional value.  Yams have virtually no nutritional value and are a type of sweet potato.  That is the difference between sweet potatoes and yams.  Who knew?  I want to try this first recipe.  I love stuffed baked potatoes, so this might be a good choice for me.  I’ll let you know how I far!

Ambrosia Stuffed Sweet Potato

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“ Serve this recipe as a healthy breakfast alternative or as a dinnertime side dish with baked chicken, turkey or lean ham.”

Ingredients

1 medium sweet potato (about 8 ounces)

3 tablespoons light sour cream

2 tablespoons marshmallow crème

1 tablespoon sweetened coconut flakes

1 tablespoon chopped pecans

4 teaspoons drained crushed pineapple

4 dried apricot halves, chopped

Instructions

Preheat oven to 400º F Wash the sweet potato, pat dry and pierce in several places with a fork; bake for 45-50 minutes or microwave for 5-7 minutes, or until fork tender; cool slightly.

Combine the remaining ingredients in a bowl; mix well.

Working lengthwise, slice sweet potato in half; use a spoon to scoop out all but ¼ inch of the flesh from each half.  Place the scooped-out potato in a bowl, mash lightly with a fork; add about one-half of the ambrosia mixture to the mashed sweet potato; blend well .

Spoon this mixture back into the potato skins and top each with the remaining ambrosia.

Cholesterol: 8 mg Sodium: 61 mg Vitamin A: 4,139 IU Fiber: 4g Number of

servings (yield): 2 Calories: 216 Fat: 6g Protein: 4g

Traditional Sweet Potato Casserole

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“Top this lightened version of the classic sweet potato casserole with both marshmallows and toasted pecans.

YIELD: 16 servings

COURSE: Side Dishes/Vegetables

Ingredients

2-1/2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes

3/4 cup packed brown sugar

1/4 cup butter, softened

1-1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 cup finely chopped pecans, divided

Cooking spray

2 cups miniature marshmallows

Preparation

Preheat oven to 375°.

Place the sweet potatoes in a Dutch oven, and cover with cold water.  Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer for 15 minutes or until very tender. Drain; cool slightly.

Place potatoes in a large bowl. Add sugar and next 3 ingredients (through vanilla). Mash sweet potato mixture with a potato masher. Fold in 1/4 cup pecans. Scrape potato mixture into an even layer in an 11 x 7-inch baking dish coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup pecans; top with marshmallows. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until golden.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving

Calories: 186 Calories from fat: 27% Fat: 5.5g Saturated fat: 2g

Monounsaturated fat: 2.3g Polyunsaturated fat: 0.9g Protein: 1.6g

Carbohydrate: 33.1g Fiber: 2.5g Cholesterol: 8mg Iron: 0.7mg Sodium:

272mg Calcium: 23mg

Nutrition Guidelines for Healthy Living Cooking Light NOVEMBER 2007

Sweet Potato Coconut Casserole       

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3 cups sweet potatoes, mashed

1-1/2 cups sugar

4 eggs, beaten

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 teaspoon dark rum (optional)

1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1 teaspoon cinnamon

Pinch of salt

2-1/2 cups milk

1 stick butter

1 cup flaked coconut (optional)

Wash and peel potatoes and boil until tender in salted water. Mash with butter while still hot. Stir in sugar, vanilla, lemon and seasonings.

Beat eggs well and combine with milk. If using coconut, add to milk.  Slowly add milk to sweet potatoes, stirring until well mixed.

Butter a casserole and transfer potato mixture, spreading evenly. Dot the top with an extra tablespoon of butter, if desired.

Bake at 400°F until firm and lightly browned.

Submitted by: CM

I am also not big on gravies.  I am a purist.  I want to taste the turkey in its entire wonderful flavor.  But, for you that want gravy here are some recipes for different types.

Holiday Turkey Gravy

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Submitted By: cynjne

Prep Time: 15 Minutes

Cook Time: 3 Hours 20 Minutes

Ready In: 3 Hours 35 Minutes

Servings: 10

“Turkey gravy made with from-scratch stock is enriched with the drippings of the roasted turkey, plus a bit of tomato paste and red currant jelly to deepen The flavors.” ~ cynjne

INGREDIENTS:

1 pound giblets, neck, and clipped wing tips from turkey

2 carrots, roughly chopped

1 stalk celery, roughly chopped

6 cups water

2 cups chicken stock

1-1/2 cups turkey drippings from

Roasted turkey

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons tomato paste

2 tablespoons red currant jelly

Salt and ground black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

While the turkey is roasting, place the giblets, turkey neck, and clipped turkey wing tips into a large saucepan with the carrots, celery, water, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over medium heat, skim off any foam that forms on the top, reduce heat to low, and simmer the stock for 3 hours. Strain the stock, skim off the fat, and set aside. There should be about 4 cups of stock.

Skim off and discard all but 1/4 cup of the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan, and place the roasting pan over medium heat. Whisk in the flour, then cook and stir the flour mixture until it becomes pale golden brown, about 5 minutes. Whisk in the stock and tomato paste; bring to a boil, simmer for 5 minutes, then whisk in the red currant jelly. Simmer for 10 more minutes. Season to taste with salt and black pepper.

FOOTNOTES:

Editor’s Notes:  This recipe assumes that the turkey will produce about 1 1/2 cups of drippings after skimming. Actual amount may vary. The nutrition data for this recipe includes the full amount of the stock ingredients. The actual amount of the ingredients consumed will vary. The nutrition data also includes the full amount of fat from the pan drippings, although the recipe calls for partially skimming the fat.

Nutrition Information Servings  Per Recipe:

10 Calories: 398 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 36.2g

Cholesterol: 163mg Sodium: 111mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 7.5g

Dietary Fiber: 0.7g Protein: 10.1g

Rich Make-Ahead Turkey Gravy

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Submitted By: benwa

Photo By: Wyattdogster

Prep Time: 30 Minutes

Cook Time: 2 Hours 30 Minutes

Ready In: 3 Hours

Servings: 18

“You make this richly-flavored turkey gravy ahead, and freeze or refrigerate until the Big Day. Reheat to serve, and mix with the turkey pan drippings if you like. There’s no rush or last-minute stress to make perfect gravy.”

INGREDIENTS:

3 pounds turkey wings

2 small onions, quartered

2 stalks celery, each cut into 4 pieces

2 carrots, each cut into 4 pieces

2 cloves garlic, halved

1-1/2 cups dry white wine

4 cups chicken broth

4 cups water

1/4 teaspoon dried thyme

2 tablespoons butter, or more if

Needed (optional)

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

Salt and ground black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Place the turkey wings, onions, celery, carrots, and garlic into a roasting pan, and roast until the turkey wings turn a deep golden brown color, about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Transfer the cooked wings and vegetables to a large pot. Place the roasting pan over 2 stove burners on medium-high heat, then pour the white wine into the roasting pan.

Scrape off and dissolve any browned flavor bits from the bottom of the pan into the white wine; heat and scrape the roasting pan until the drippings and wine have reduced to about 1/2 cup. Pour the wine mixture into the saucepan with the turkey wings.

Pour chicken broth and water into the pot, and season with thyme. Push the turkey wings down into the liquid; bring the mixture to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 45 minutes. Skim off any foam that collects on top. Pour the broth mixture through a colander into a large bowl; pick meat from the wings, if desired, to add to gravy, or discard the spent wings and vegetables. Allow the gravy base to stand for several minutes for the fat to collect into a layer on top, and skim as much fat as possible. Transfer the skimmed fat into a saucepan. There should be at least 1/2 cup of turkey fat; add butter to make this amount if necessary.

Whisk the flour into the turkey fat over medium heat until the flour mixture becomes smooth and golden brown. Gradually whisk in the broth until the gravy comes to a boil and thickens. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Allow the gravy to cool, then refrigerate or freeze. Reheat almost to boiling to serve.

FOOTNOTES:

Editor’s Note:   The nutrition data for this recipe includes the full amount of the stock ingredients. The actual amount of the ingredients consumed will vary.

Cook’s Note:   For richer flavor, add turkey pan drippings to the gravy at serving time.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 18

Calories: 108 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 4.6g Cholesterol: 24mg

Sodium: 59mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 4.9g Dietary Fiber: 0.5g

Protein: 7.7g

 

 

Cider-Sage Gravy

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Source: ChrisandAmy

Photo: by Sarah Shatz

This recipe was a finalist in the contest for Your Best Gravy ata food52.com.

A&M’s Testing Notes: ChrisandAmy’s Vermont-inspired gravy would transform even the saddest, most dessicated turkey into a delicacy. It’s ready ten minutes after the turkey emerges from the oven…

ChrisandAmy’s Notes: A recent trip to Vermont acted as inspiration for us to use Vermont ingredients in a Sunday Fall Feast. We used apple cider from the Cold Hollow Cider Mill in Waterbury, Vermont to make this gravy that we served with a dry-brined roasted turkey. – ChrisandAmy

Yield:  2 cups gravy

1 small bunch sage leaves

3 tablespoons (or more) drippings from turkey

1 cup apple cider

3 tablespoons flour

1 cup homemade or low sodium chicken stock

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Add the sage leaves to the roasting pan with the drippings from roasting the turkey. (If you have at least 6 tablespoons of drippings, you can double the recipe.).

Place the pan over medium heat and allow the sage to infuse the fat and heat until the leaves start to stick to the bottom of the pan, about 3 minutes.

Deglaze the pan by slowly adding the apple cider, stirring to scrape up the brown bits. Simmer for 3 minutes.

Whisk together the flour and chicken stock in a separate container until smooth. Slowly pour the stock/flour mixture into the pan and stir continuously until it reaches the desired consistency, 5 to 10 minutes.

Remove the sage leaves and add salt and pepper to taste.

Remove from heat and pour into a gravy boat to serve and enjoy.

My very favorite food to make is turkey.  After you rinse the turkey and pat it dry, stuff the cavities with a large fresh juice orange and a large onion, then you can either truss and sew or skewer the cavities closed or stuff them with crushed up aluminum foil.  I always squeeze the juice of the orange into the cavity.  My very good friend, Mary, told me she stuffs her turkey’s cavities with an orange, an apple and a pear.  I going to try that this year.  I love to baste my turkey and watch it turn golden.  I will give you the recipe for the basting sauce I make and tell you the secret to a great turkey is to baste it every ½ hour and to begin cooking it breast-side down and half-way through the cooking time, turn it over and finish the roasting of the turkey with the breast-side up.  Cook the turkey according to the package directions.  If you see the wings are getting too brown, wrap them in foil and the remove foil about 5 minutes before taking the turkey out of the oven and let them cook uncovered for those 5 minutes.

DISCLAIMER:  this photo is just an example of basting a turkey.  It does not go with the recipe below.

 

 

MARILYN’S TURKEY BASTING SAUCE

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1 stick Butter OR Margarine

1-2 tbsps. Honey

1/4 cup Orange Juice

1/8 cup Wine (I prefer a sweet wine when I make this sauce)

1 tsp. Poultry Seasoning

1 tsp. Rosemary

1 tsp. Thyme

1 tbsp. Dried Parsley (a few sprigs if you want to use Fresh Parsley)

1/4 tsp. Garlic Powder

2 tbsp. Dried Onion Flakes (optional)

Put margarine in small saucepan and put on lower heat to begin melting it.  As soon as it begins to melt, add the orange juice, honey and wine.  Stir a bit then add your spices.  Mix well.  Use to baste your turkeys!

I’ve been making my turkeys with this sauce that I made up since I can remember, about 50 years now, as I started learning how to cook the turkeys when I was about 10 years old.  Yes, my mother did the hard part of the cooking of the turkey, but I was the baster.  I love the bit of sweetness that the honey and wine imparts to the sauce!  Hope you enjoy it.  You can always adjust the seasonings  to your own tastes!  ~Softa123 aka Marilyn

Soy-Sauce-And-Honey-Glazed Turkey

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SOURCE: Joanne Chang at foodandwine.com

PHOTO: © Con Poulos

ACTIVE: 45 MIN TOTAL TIME: 6 HRS 45 MIN

” ‘We never had turkey on Thanksgiving, ” says Joanne Chang, “only duck. I love turkey with sage and butter, but I crave the flavors I grew up with.’ Here, she marinates and bastes the bird with soy, sesame, honey and ginger, giving it superb flavor and a beautiful mahogany color.” ~Joanne Chang

2 cups soy sauce

1 cup honey

1/4 cup toasted sesame oil

1/2 cup thinly sliced fresh ginger

One 14- to 16-pound turkey

1 tablespoon kosher salt

2 teaspoons freshly ground pepper

1-1/2 teaspoons Chinese five-spice powder

6 scallions cut into 2-inch lengths

2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium broth

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened

3/4 cup all-purpose flour

In a very large bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, honey, sesame oil and half of the ginger. Put the turkey in the bowl, breast side down, and marinate at room temperature for 45 minutes.

Turn the turkey and marinate breast side up for 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350°.

Set a rack in a large roasting pan.

In a small bowl, combine the salt, pepper and five-spice powder. Remove the turkey from the marinade; reserve the marinade.

Set the turkey on the rack, breast side up, and season it inside and out with the salt mixture. Stuff the cavity with the scallions and the remaining ginger

Turn the turkey breast side down on the rack. Add 2 cups of water to the roasting pan. Loosely cover the turkey with a foil tent. Roast the turkey for 4 hours, basting with some of the reserved marinade every hour and adding a total of 3 cups of water to the pan during roasting.

Turn the turkey breast side up and baste well with the reserved marinade. Roast uncovered for 30 minutes, basting once halfway through cooking.

The turkey is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thigh registers 165°.  Carefully pour the juices from the turkey cavity into the roasting pan and transfer the turkey to a carving board. Let rest in a warm place for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, strain the pan juices into a large saucepan and skim off the fat. Add the chicken stock to the juices along with 3 cups of water and bring to a boil.

In a medium bowl, blend the butter with the flour to make a smooth paste. Gradually whisk in 2 cups of the hot pan juices until smooth. Whisk the mixture into the saucepan and bring the gravy to a simmer, whisking constantly, until thickened.

Simmer the gravy over low heat, whisking occasionally, until no floury taste remains, about 8 minutes. Carve the turkey; pass the gravy at the table.

Our Pairing Suggestion:   California’s Monterey region is an up-and-coming area for Pinot Noir, thanks to its cool, ocean-influenced climate, which gives the wines great acidity and generous fruit intensity. That balance makes them go especially well with the different flavors of the Thanksgiving feast—especially turkey.

Servings: 12

Winter Fruit Glazed Turkey

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1 (12-pound) whole turkey, fresh or frozen (thawed)

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 large orange, cut in eight wedges, seeds removed

1/4 cup red currant jelly

2 tablespoons orange marmalade

1/2 teaspoon anise seeds, ground coarse by mortar/pestle or a coffee grinder

1. To Prepare Turkey: Remove giblets and neck from turkey; reserve for gravy. Rinse turkey with cold running water and drain well. Blot dry with paper towels.

2. Sprinkle salt and pepper in the cavities of the bird. Place orange wedges in both body and neck cavities.

3. Fold neck skin and fasten to the back with skewers. Fold the wings under the back of the turkey. Return legs to tucked position.

4. For Winter Fruit Glaze: In 1-cup microwave-safe glass measure, combine jelly, marmalade and anise seeds. Cook in microwave at HIGH (100% power) 30 to 45 seconds or until melted.

5. Brush glaze over turkey during last 20 minutes of roasting time.

6. To Roast Turkey: Place turkey, breast side up, on a rack in a large shallow (no more than 2 1/2-inch deep) roasting pan. Insert an oven-safe thermometer into thickest part of the thigh, being careful it does not touch the bone.

7. Roast turkey in a preheated 325 degree F oven about 3 1/2 hours (total roasting time) basting with the pan juices. During the last 20 minutes of roasting time, baste the bird with the Winter Fruit Glaze. Continue to roast until the thermometer registers 180 degrees F in the thigh and 170 degrees F in the breast. 8. Remove turkey from the oven and allow the bird to rest for 15-20 minutes before carving. Place on a warm large platter and garnish.

Makes 15 servings.Recipe and photograph provided courtesy of the National Turkey Federation.

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THANKSGIVING – #4

Posted on November 16, 2011. Filed under: Breads - Yeast, Cherries, Coconut, Comfort Foods, Dairy, General Crafts, Holiday Songs, Hope, Kids, Oranges, Paerve, Party Ideas, Parve, Pears, Pineapple, Quick Breads, Recipes with Pumpkin, Scottish Recipes, Thanksgiving Recipes, Tried and True Recipe, Vegetables | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |


We Gather Together

Traditional Thanksgiving Song

We gather together to ask the Lord’s blessing;

He chastens and hastens His will to make known.

The wicked oppressing now cease from distressing.

Sing praises to His Name; He forgets not His own.

 

Beside us to guide us, our God with us joining,

Ordaining, maintaining His kingdom divine;

So from the beginning the fight we were winning;

Thou, Lord, were at our side, all glory be Thine!

 

We all do extol Thee, Thou Leader triumphant,

And pray that Thou still our Defender will be.

Let Thy congregation escape tribulation;

Thy Name be ever praised! O Lord, make us free!

I was not going to do a craft article today, but I ran across a project that is too cute and easy not to alert you to.  The project is a “Give Thanks” Fall Banner.  You can find it at a great craft site called “The Kurtz Corner,” and to get there just click on “Give Thanks.”  For today’s recipe theme I have chosen bread recipes.  Don’t forget you can make bread a week or two ahead of time and freeze it, then bake it fresh or if you already have baked it, just reheat it before serving.

When I think of bread, I think of a bread basket teaming with freshly baked bread, rolls, sweet rolls, muffins and quick breads just waiting to be topped with butter, margarine, jams, preserves and jellies of all kinds.  So, depending on my speed putting everything together, this may be part 1 of a 2 part series.  If it is, I will alert you to this fact at the bottom of the article.

My choice for the first recipe is a pumpkin challah.  Challah is egg bread that is eaten on Friday nights and Saturdays by Jewish people to celebrate the Sabbath.  It is also eaten on most holidays.  Flavored challahs such as this one is a very new innovation.  So far my favorite is chocolate chip!

Pumpkin Challah

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Yield: This recipe makes 2 smaller loaves.

“We like to eat one sliced and unadorned, and use the other loaf for French toast.”

Ingredients:

2-1/4 teaspoons (1 packet) yeast

2/3 cup warm water

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup pumpkin puree

1-1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom

4 cups flour, plus more for dusting and kneading

1 egg

Sesame or poppy seeds (optional)

Method:

In a large bowl, dissolve sugar and yeast in the warm water. Let sit 10 minutes until foamy.

Stir in pumpkin puree, salt, and spices. Add three cups of the flour and mix until well incorporated. Add remaining flour, a little at a time, until dough is only slightly sticky to the touch.

Dust counter or wooden board with flour and turn out dough. Knead, adding flour as needed, until you have a smooth, springy dough. Place  in a lightly greased bowl, cover, and let rise two hours, or until doubled in size.

Punch down dough and turn out onto flour-covered counter. Divide dough in half; set one half aside. For each half, divide into three approximately equal pieces. Form pieces into long snakelike strands, about 12 inches long. Braid together strands and tuck both ends under the loaf. Carefully place on a flour-dusted board, greased baking sheet, or in a greased loaf pan. Repeat for remaining dough.

Cover and let rise until doubled, about 40 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. If using a baking stone, start your preheat when you begin the second rise.

Beat egg and brush over the bread, and sprinkle on seeds, if using. Put loaves in oven and bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until tops are golden brown.

“In this version of challah, the pumpkin stands in for the eggs. Adding eggs will make for a richer dough, but of course remember that you’ll need to add flour to balance out the additional liquid.”

“Also, this pumpkin challah is only lightly spiced – I wanted to be able to have the bread fit as both breakfast and sliced alongside a savory dinner.”

Tips:

  • Use a kitchen scale to ensure equal division of dough. I’m just as bad at dividing sections for braiding bread as I am for braiding hair.
  • I add 3 cups of flour to start with and then add the rest slowly. Due to different moisture levels, varieties of flour, and measuring methods, it’s easier to start out with less flour and add what you need rather than adding all at once and finding your dough is too dry.
  • On the second rise I preheat the oven and set the dough nearby. My kitchen doesn’t maintain enough heat for bread to rise well on its own most days, so this helps tremendously.

SOFTA123’S NOTE:  I wish I knew who to credit the pumpkin challah recipe with, if anyone knows, please email me.  It’s such a well written recipe.  I also wonder how this would taste with a confectionery sugar glaze (a small amount of water mixed with a small amount of confectionery sugar for a not too thin consistency) put on it after it is thoroughly cooled.

 Figure 1 Photo by Wally G.

Favorite Sally Lunn Bread For Bread Machine

===========================================

Posted by Pink01

INGREDIENTS

For a 1 1/2 lb loaf bread:

 

1/4 cup heavy cream

1/4 to 3/8 cup water

3 large eggs

1-1/2 teaspoons salt

1/3 cup butter or margarine (cut up in pieces)

1/4 cup sugar

3 cups all purpose flour (or bread flour)

1-1/2 to 2 tsp yeast

DIRECTIONS

Place all ingredients in bread pan in order listed. Select “Basic/White Bread Cycle” and “Light Crust“. Press “Start. After the baking cycle ends, remove bread from pan, place on a wire rack and allow to cool 1 hour before slicing. Enjoy!

“I got this recipe from a Bread Machine cookbook but I can’t remember the name. This bread is awesome. It almost tastes like a pound cake!! Really delicious. It has a buttery taste. Can be sliced/toasted for sandwiches. My family looooves it!!” ~Pink01

SOFTA123’S NOTE:  I absolutely love Sally Lunn bread!  Try it, you might like it too!

Marilyn’s Garden Herb Bread

=================

1 pound Loaf:  (1 1/2 pound Loaf):

2 cups White Bread Flour, (3 cups)

1 tablespoon Dry Milk, (2 tablespoons)

1 tablespoon Sugar, (2 tablespoons)

1 teaspoon Salt, (1 1/2 teaspoons)

1 teaspoon Chives, (1/2 tablespoon)

1 teaspoon Marjoram, (1/2 tablespoon)

1 teaspoon Thyme, (1/2 tablespoon)

1/2 teaspoon Basil, (1 tablespoon)

1 tablespoon Butter, (2 tablespoons)

3/4 cup Water, (1 1/4 cups)

1 tablespoon Fast Rise Yeast -Or-, (2 teaspoons Fast Rise) Or

2 teaspoons Active Dry Yeast, (3 teaspoons Active Dry)

SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE: I rewrote the recipe to follow order of my machine. It works wonderfully in my Panasonic.

This bread tastes like stuffing! It is WONDERFUL!!!! Paul and I especially like it to make turkey sandwiches the day after Thanksgiving! ~SOFTA123

Here are some hints from the book I found the recipe in:

1. Use dried herbs that are flaked and not ground.  If using ground, reduce the amt. by half. If using fresh herbs, double the recipe.

2. This recipe can be made with the regular, rapid, or delayed time bake cycles.

This recipes comes from “Bread Electric” from the Innovative Cooking Enterprises. I make the regular size loaf in my machine.

Servings: 8 slices for the small loaf

Now let’s make some delicious dinner rolls.  This is my preference for the bread coarse at Thanksgiving.  I have to admit it, I cheat.  I buy the heat and serve rolls!  But maybe this year will be different.  Anyhow here are recipes for dinner rolls.

Pioneer Woman’s No Knead Dinner Rolls

=====================================

Added by Ree on June 26, 2009

Prep Time 4 Hours

Cook Time 20 Minutes

Servings 24

Difficulty Easy

Ingredients

4 cups Milk

1 cup Sugar

1 cup Vegetable Oil

9 cups Flour

2 packages (4 1/2 Tsp.) Active Dry Yeast

1 teaspoon (heaping) Baking Powder

1 teaspoon (scant) Baking Soda

2 tablespoons Salt

Preparation Instructions

Pour 4 cups of milk into a stock pot or Dutch oven. Add one cup of sugar and 1 cup of vegetable oil. Stir to combine. Now, turn the burner on medium to medium-low and “scald” the mixture/lukewarm (between 90 and 110 degrees). Before the mixture boils, turn off the heat. NOW.

Very important stuff here: walk away. Walk away and allow this mixture to cool to warm/lukewarm. The mixture will need to be warm enough to be a hospitable environment for the yeast, but not so hot that it kills the yeast and makes it inactive. I don’t usually use a thermometer, but if you’d like to, a good temperature is between 90 and 110 degrees. I usually feel the side of the pan with the palm of my hand. If it’s hot at all, I wait another 20 minutes or so. The pan should feel comfortably warm. When the mixture is the right temperature add in 4 cups of flour and 2 packages of (4-1/2 teaspoons) of active dry yeast.

After the yeast and flour are nicely incorporated, add another 4 cups of flour. Stir together and allow to sit, covered with a tea towel or lid, for an hour.

After about an hour it should have almost doubled in size. If it hasn’t changed much, put it in a warm (but turned off ) oven for 45 minutes or so. When it has risen sufficiently add 1 more cup of flour, 1 heaping teaspoon of baking powder, 1 scant teaspoon of baking soda and about 2 tablespoons of salt. Stir (or knead just a bit) until combined.

Butter 1 or 2 muffin pans.

Form the rolls by pinching off a walnut sized piece of dough and rolling it into a little ball. Repeat and tuck three balls of dough into each buttered muffin cup. Continue until pan is full. Cover and allow to rise for about 1 to 2 hours.

Bake in a 400-degree oven until golden brown, about 17 to 20 minutes.

SOFTA123’S NOTE:  For step-by-step instructions go to The Pioneer Woman’s

website located at:

http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2007/11/pw_dinner_rolls_-_no_kneading_required/

Whole Wheat Challah Rolls – Pareve

===================================

Posted by : Karen Selwyn

“Flecks of grated carrot add color and flavor to these whole-wheat dinner rolls from cookbook author and food writer Judy Zeidler. The dough is remarkably easy to mix, knead and shape.” Judith Evans

2 cups whole-wheat flour

2 cups unbleached flour

1 package active dry yeast

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup warm water (110 to 115 degrees)

1/4 cup vegetable oil, plus more to coat bowl and top of dough

2 tablespoons honey

2 eggs, divided

1 cup peeled, grated carrots

Poppy seeds or sesame seeds

Combine whole-wheat and unbleached flours. Place 2 cups flour mixture, yeast and salt in a large mixing bowl.

Heat warm water, oil and honey in a saucepan or microwave oven until very warm, about 115 to 120 degrees. Add water mixture to flour-yeast mixture, beating until well blended. Add 1 egg, carrots and enough reserved flour to make a soft dough.

Turn dough onto a floured board. Knead 5 to 10 minutes, adding additional reserved flour as needed to make a smooth and elastic dough.  Place dough in an oiled bowl. Oil the top of dough. Cover with a towel; let rise in a warm place until double in size, about 1 1/2 hours.

Divide dough into about 30 small pieces. Form into long ropes, twist into knots and place on a greased baking sheet. Cover with a towel. Let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.

Beat remaining egg and use to brush tops of rolls. Sprinkle rolls with poppy seeds. Bake in a preheated 350-degree oven 20 to 30 minutes, or until golden brown.

Yield: About 30 rolls.

Source: “The 1994 Favorites” Judith Evans ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH (On-line edition), 1/2/95

Perfect Dinner Rolls

====================

“These rolls melt in your mouth. I loved them as a child, and I’m happy to make them for my kids because I know I am making for them the same wonderful memories my mom made for me!” —Gayleen Grote, Battle View, North Dakota

24 Servings

Prep: 30 min. + rising Bake: 15 min.

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon active dry yeast

2-1/4 cups warm water (110° to 115°)

1/3 cup sugar

1/3 cup shortening

1/4 cup powdered nondairy creamer

2-1/4 teaspoons salt

6 to 7 cups bread flour

Directions:

In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. Add the sugar, shortening, creamer, salt and 5 cups flour. Beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a soft dough (dough will be sticky).

Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes.

Place in a bowl coated with cooking spray, turning once to coat the top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.

Punch dough down. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; divide into 24 pieces. Shape each into a roll. Place 2 in. apart on baking sheets coated with cooking spray.

Cover and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes.

Bake at 350° for 12-15 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove from pans to wire racks.

Yield: 2 dozen.

Nutrition Facts: 1 roll equals 142 calories, 3 g fat (1 g saturated

fat), 0 cholesterol, 222 mg sodium, 25 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 4 g

protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1-1/2 starch, 1/2 fat.

Golden Sweet Cornbread

======================

Submitted By: bluegirl

Photo By: larkspur

Prep Time: 10 Minutes

Cook Time: 25 Minutes

Ready In: 35 Minutes

Servings: 12

“If you like sweet cornbread, this is the recipe for you! My mom made this for me as a child, and now it’s my family’s favorite.”

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup yellow cornmeal

2/3 cup white sugar

1 teaspoon salt

3-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1 egg

1 cup milk

1/3 cup vegetable oil

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Spray or lightly grease a 9 inch round cake pan.

In a large bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt and baking powder. Stir in egg, milk and vegetable oil until well combined. Pour batter into prepared pan.

Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 12 Calories: 188 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 7.4g Cholesterol: 19mg Sodium: 354mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 28.2g Dietary Fiber: 1g Protein: 3.1g

White Chocolate Cranberry Quick Bread

====================================

2-1/4 cups All-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon Salt

1/4 teaspoon Baking soda

5 ounces White chocolate; coarsely chopped

8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter; softened

1 cup Granulated sugar

3 large Eggs; at room temperature

1/2 cup Buttermilk

3 tablespoons Orange juice

1 teaspoon Grated orange zest

1 teaspoon Vanilla extract

3/4 cup Dried cranberries; chopped

YIELD: 1 loaf

PREPARATION:

45 minutes plus baking and cooling times.

1. Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees F. Lightly butter a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan. Dust the pan with flour and tap out the excess.

2. In a medium bowl, using a wire whisk, stir together the flour, salt, and baking soda. Set aside.

3. Melt the white chocolate according to the directions in the chocolate Melting Tips. Set aside to cool.

4. In a 4 1/2-quart bowl of a heavy-duty electric mixer using the paddle attachment, beat the butter at medium speed for 2 minutes until creamy.  While continuing to beat the butter, gradually add the sugar 1 teaspoon at a time until completely incorporated into the butter. Beat in the eggs, one at a time. Using a rubber spatula, scrape down the side of the bowl and beat the mixture for 1 minute more. At low speed, beat the buttermilk into the batter. At this point the batter will look curdled.

Add the melted white chocolate, orange juice, zest, and vanilla to the batter and mix just until blended.

5. At low speed, add the dry ingredients to the batter one-third at a time and mix until blended. Stir in the chopped dried cranberries.

6. Scrape the batter into the prepared loaf pan and bake for 70 to 75 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean. Cool the bread in the pan set on a wire rack for 15 minutes.

Remove the bread from the pan and cool it completely on a wire rack.

Thanksgiving Bread Recipe

=========================

Thanksgiving Bread ingredients list:

4 medium eggs

4 cups of all purpose flour

3 cups of sugar

2 cups of cranberries (fresh or frozen)

2 cups of pumpkin (cooked or canned)

1 cup of vegetable oil

2 tablespoons of pumpkin pie spice

2 teaspoons of baking soda

1 teaspoon of salt

 

Instructions for Thanksgiving Bread:

In a suitably sized mixing bowl, beat the eggs and sugar. Add the pumpkin and vegetable oil and mix thoroughly.

Add all of the dry ingredients and stir until just moistened.  Fold in the fresh or frozen cranberries.

Spoon into suitably sized loaf pans.

Bake at 350°F (175°C) for 60 minutes.

Allow to cool for 10 minutes, then remove to wire racks.

Orange Praline Quick Bread

==========================

“A crusty brown sugar glaze adds just a touch of the South to these Orange-scented mini loaves.”

20 min. Prep time

60 min. Total time

32 servings (4 mini loaves)

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup sugar

1 cup LAND O LAKES® Sour Cream

1/2 cup LAND O LAKES® Butter, softened

2 eggs

1 tablespoon freshly grated orange peel

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup chopped pecans

Glaze

1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar

1/3 cup LAND O LAKES® Butter

1/4 cup finely chopped pecans

Heat oven to 350°F. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in small bowl. Set aside.

Combine all remaining bread ingredients except pecans in large bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until well mixed. Reduce speed to low. Beat, gradually adding flour mixture, just until moistened. Stir in 1 cup pecans.

Spoon batter evenly into 4 greased (5 1/2×3-inch) mini loaf pans. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes; remove from pans.

Meanwhile, combine brown sugar and 1/3 cup butter in 1-quart saucepan. Cook over medium heat until mixture comes to a boil (3 to 4 minutes).

Spoon glaze mixture over warm loaves. Immediately sprinkle with 1/4 cup pecans.

Substitute for Mini Loaf Pans:   1 greased (9×5-inch) loaf pan. Bake for 60 to 65 minutes.

Recipe Tip:

Serve bread with maple-flavored butter. Combine 1/3 cup softened butter, 1/4 cup orange marmalade and 1 tablespoon maple syrup in small bowl; mix well.

Calories: 160Fat: 10gCholesterol: 30mgSodium: 125mgCarbohydrates:

16gDietary Fiber: <1gProtein: 2g

This recipe was reprinted from landolakes.com.

http://www.landolakes.com/recipe/7 6

Pina Colada Quick Bread

=======================

“Think pina colada, think summer time … but do you think bread? It sounds like the oddest of combinations, but there are lots of variations on recipes for pina colada quick bread (or coconut pineapple bread).”

Ingredients

4 eggs

1 & 1/4 cup oil

2 cups granulated sugar

1 teaspoon coconut extract

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon orange extract

1/4 cup pineapple juice

1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 (20 ounce) can crushed pineapple, drained

1/2 cup flaked coconut

1/2 cup chopped maraschino cherries

Instructions

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Grease and flour well two 7 x 4-inch loaf pans.

Beat eggs slightly. Stir in oil and sugar. Add extracts, pineapple juice and orange zest.

In a separate bowl, soft together flour, salt, baking soda and cinnamon. Add to egg mixture and miX just until ingredients are moistened.

Gently stir in crushed pineapple, coconut, maraschino cherries and nuts. Do not stir too much or bread will be heavy.

Pour into prepared loaf pans. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted comes out clean.

Let cool in pan for 10 minutes before removing.

CulinaryTradition: USA (Nouveau)

 

Sparkling Orange Scones

=======================

“These buttery sugared scones are perfect for gift-giving or a warm breakfast tea.”

30 min. Prep time

1 :10 Total time

16 scones

Topping

 1/4 cup sugar

1-1/2 teaspoons freshly grated orange peel

Scones

 

2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup cold LAND O LAKES® Butter, cut into 8 pieces

1/2 cup sugar

3/4 cup sweetened dried cranberries or blueberries or finely chopped dried aprico s

3/4 cup LAND O LAKES™ Half & Half

1 egg

1 tablespoon freshly grated orange peel

Almond Butter

  

1/2 cup LAND O LAKES® Butter, softened

2 tablespoons powdered sugar

1/2 teaspoon almond extract

Heat oven to 375°F. Combine all topping ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Set aside.

Combine flour, baking powder and salt in large bowl; cut in butter with pastry blender or fork until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in 1/2 cup sugar and cranberries.

Stir together half & half, egg and 1 tablespoon orange peel in small bowl until smooth. Stir into flour mixture just until moistened. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; knead 8 to 10 times until smooth, adding small amount of flour, if necessary.

Divide dough in half. Pat each half into 7-inch circle. Place 2 inches apart onto large ungreased baking sheet. Sprinkle topping evenly over dough. Score each half into 8 wedges; do not separate. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until scones are lightly browned. Cool 15 to 20 minutes on baking sheet.

Meanwhile, combine all almond butter ingredients in small bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until well mixed.

To serve, separate scones while warm. Serve with almond butter. Store leftover scones in container with tight-fitting lid at room temperature. Store remaining almond butter covered in refrigerator.

TIP: One large or two medium oranges will yield what is needed for the grated orange peel.

TIP: A pastry blender is made of 5 or 6 parallel U-shaped steel wires attached at both ends to a handle. It cuts the butter into small pieces so the flour can coat the particles. Two knives may also be used.

Calories: 240Fat: 12gCholesterol: 45mgSodium: 190mgCarbohydrates:

30gDietary Fiber: 1gProtein: 3g Recipe #11682©2001Land O’Lakes, Inc.

This recipe was reprinted from landolakes.com.

Almond Muffins

==============

Almond Muffins ingredients list:

1 medium egg, beaten

2 cups of flour

3/4 cup of milk

1/2 cup of almonds, chopped

1/2 cup of sugar

1/2 cup of oil

1 tablespoons of baking powder

1/2 teaspoon of almond extract

1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon of nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon of salt

Instructions for Almond Muffins:

Mix together the egg, milk, oil and almond extract.

In another bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, nutmeg,

cinnamon, salt and chopped almonds.

Mix the two mixtures.

Bake at 390F for about 15 minutes.

Pear Upside-Down Muffins

========================

Recipe #386216

| 1 1/4 hours | 40 min prep |

By: daisygrl64

Aug 19, 2009

“These cakelike muffins with sticky tops turn out of the pan perfectly, if you Let them cool a little first. And Oh Boy….are these Fabulous!!” ~Daisygrl64

Yield: 12 muffins

Ingredients

 

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup brown sugar, packed

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup buttermilk

1/2 cup butter, melted

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

Topping

2 pears, peeled, cored and cut into 1/2inch slice

1/2 cup brown sugar, packed

1/4 cup raisins

1 teaspoon cinnamon

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Directions

1 grease nonstick muffin cups. line bottoms with parchment or waxed paper and set aside.

2 Topping:.

3 peel, core, and cut pears into 1/2 dice, place in a bowl. add sugar, raisins, and cinnamon, stir to mix.

4 in skillet melt butter over medium heat, cook pear mixture, stirring, until pears are tender, about 5 minutes. divide among muffin cups and set aside.

5 in bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. in separate bowl whisk buttermilk, butter, egg, and vanilla. add to dry ingredients and stir just until moistened. spoon over each muffin cup that has the pear mixture in.

6 bake in centre of 375*F oven until toothpick inserted in centre comes out clean, about 20 minutes.

7 let cool on rack for 10 minutes. invert onto baking sheet.

8 serve topping side up.

Carrot, Sunflower Seed And Raisin Bran Muffins

==============================================

CDKitchen http://www.cdkitchen.com

Serves/Makes: 12

Difficulty Level: 3

Ready In: 30-60 minutes

Ingredients:

2-1/2 cups Wheat Bran

1-1/2 cups Whole-Wheat Flour

2 teaspoons Baking Soda

2 teaspoons Baking Powder

1 teaspoon ground Cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground Ginger

1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt

1/4 teaspoon ground Nutmeg

1-1/2 cups Apple Juice

1/4 cup Blackstrap Molasses

2 tablespoons Sunflower Oil; plus additional for oiling pan

3/4 cup Carrots; shredded

1/2 cup Sunflower Seeds

1/2 cup Raisins

Directions:

PREHEAT oven to 350 degrees F.

Using a little sunflower oil, LIGHTLY OIL a muffin pan and set aside. In a large bowl, place the wheat bran, whole wheat flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger, salt, and nutmeg, and stir well to combine.

In a small bowl, place the apple juice, molasses, and sunflower oil, and whisk well to combine.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir well to combine. Add the remaining ingredients and gently fold them into the muffin batter.

Fill each of the prepared muffin cups 3/4 full with the batter. Bake at 350 degrees F. for 25 to 30 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

Remove the muffin tin from the oven and allow the muffins to cool for several minutes before removing them from the muffin tin. Store the completely cooled muffins in an airtight container.

Recipe Location:

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/503/Carrot-Sunflower-Seed-And-Rai1

26924.sht l

Recipe ID: 97797

Watch for tomorrow’s post (11/16/2011) for spreads to go with these breads!

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Halloween Fun #11

Posted on October 28, 2011. Filed under: Autumn, Cherries, Chocolate, Comfort Foods, Dairy, Halloween Recipes, Halloween Snacks, Honey, Jello, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Nuts, Party Ideas, Popcorn, Recipes, Rochester, Snacks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |


A Spooky Night

Last night, I got into bed to take my medications before going to sleep, and as I was sorting out the vials, the lights suddenly went out and it was pitch black.  I picked up the phone to call Rochester Gas & Electric, our local gas company, and even the phone was dead.  Thank G-d for cell phones!  Paul had a small pen light to make his way to his cell phone and I knew that I had put an electric candle on the bookshelves right outside our bedroom door.  So, Paul got out of bed, got his cell and the candle.  We tried to find the switch and it was as fine as a hair pin or a very thin needle.  We kept trying to manipulate it and figured the batteries were dead.  So, I opened up the battery  compartment to find that there we no batteries in it.  Luckily, Paul knew just where to get the batteries…on his chair in the bedroom.  Then he had trouble closing the compartment up.  It’s hard to do everything by yourself.  He was trying to do it one-handed while he held the penlight.  I suggested that he give me a try.  I had him hold the light and, of course, because I did it with two-hands, I got it closed and it worked.

Next we called 411 for the phone number of RG&E.  We attempted that three times to no avail!  So, I suggested we call my mother who does not live in our area.  At that point I figured that it was area –wide.  Luckily, everything was fine at my mom’s house and we asked her to call.  We wanted to make sure that RG&E knew what was happening because it was about 40 degrees when I last checked the temperature at about 6 pm and this was 8:30-9:00ish.  I didn’t want to freeze to death!  Mom told me they would have us back up by 11:00 p.m.  They were true to their word.  I’d say we were up around 10:00 p.m.

To make matters worse, I just woke up and discovered that snow on the skylight in our bathroom!  I haven’t looked out to see what it’s doing now, but I am going to the beauty parlor to have my hair done and I don’t want it to get ruined before I get home!

Now for today’s article, I thought I would make this a hodge –podge of recipes for popcorn balls!  They are much fun to make.

Cinnamon Red Hot Popcorn

========================

10 cups of air-popped popcorn (1/2 cup unpopped)

1-1/2 cups (7 oz.) coarsely chopped pecans

3/4 cup sugar

3/4 cup brown sugar

1/2 cup light corn syrup

3 tablespoons hot pepper sauce

2 tablespoons honey

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature, cut into thin pats

1 tablespoon cinnamon

Yield: 18 cups

Heat oven to 250 degrees. Place popcorn and pecans in 5-quart ovenproof bowl or Dutch oven. Bake 15 minutes.

Combine sugars, corn syrup, pepper sauce and honey in 2-quart saucepan.  Bring to a full boil over medium-high heat, stirring just until sugars dissolve. Boil about 6 to 8 minutes or until soft-crack stage (290 degrees on candy thermometer). Do not stir. Remove from heat.

Gradually add butter and cinnamon to sugar mixture, stirring gently until well blended. Pour over popcorn, tossing to coat evenly. Spread popcorn mixture on greased baking sheets, using two forks. Cool completely. Break into bite-size pieces. Store airtight up to two weeks.

Note: If popcorn mixture sets too quickly, return to oven to re-warm.  Popcorn mixture can be shaped into 3-inch balls while warm, if desired.

Butterfinger Popcorn Balls

==========================

6 cups popped popcorn

3 (2.1-ounce) NESTLE® BUTTERFINGER® Candy Bars, chopped

1/4 cup butter or margarine

3-1/2 cups miniature marshmallows

These fun-filled popcorn balls are great to make with the kids before settling in for a night of videos and snuggling.

1. Combine popcorn and chopped Butterfinger in large bowl.

2. Melt butter in medium saucepan over low heat. Stir in marshmallows.

Heat, stirring constantly, until marshmallows are melted and mixture is smooth.

3. Pour over popcorn mixture; quickly toss to coat well. Spray hands with nonstick cooking spray. Form popcorn mixture into six 3-inch balls. Place on waxed paper to cool. Store in airtight container.

Makes 6 popcorn balls.

Macbeth's Three Witches

Double Double Toil and Trouble Chocolate Popcorn Balls

================================

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup corn syrup

1/4 cup butter or margarine

2 tablespoons cocoa powder

8 cups freshly popped popcorn

1 cup “M&M’s”® Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Baking Bits

Combine sugar, corn syrup, butter and cocoa in medium saucepan; bring to a boil. Add popcorn, stirring until evenly coated. Remove from heat. Stir in “M&M’s”® pieces. Cool slightly. Shape into 2” balls.

Yield: 18 balls

Nutritional Information: (Based on 1 ball) Total calories: 160 Fat: 7 g Carbohydrate: 24 g Sugar: 19 g Fiber: 2 g Protein: 1 g Sodium: 75 mg Cholesterol: 5 mg

EASY POPCORN BALLS

6 tbsp. butter

3 c. mini marshmallows

3 tbsp. flavored gelatin (any flavor)

3 qts. unsalted popcorn

butter (for hands)

Melt 6 tablespoons butter in large pan; add marshmallows. Stir until melted. Blend in gelatin. Place the popped corn in a large bowl (give yourself room to stir!), pour the gelatin mixture over the popped corn, and stir.

Butter your hands and form corn into balls. Be sure to work quickly as it gets sticky when it cools down! Vary flavor of gelatin for season; orange – Halloween; red and green – Christmas, etc.

Yields: 8-10 large balls.

Nutella Peanut Balls

====================

“Popcorn balls are an old-fashioned, easy-to-make homemade treat. They can be made in a variety of ways. You can make a basic popcorn ball and add little Halloween candies like candy corns, or you can make different flavors of popcorn balls like the Nutella popcorn balls in the photo above.

Popcorn balls are the perfect, not-too-sweet or fattening treat for Halloween. They make great treats for coworkers, friends, and family. You can serve them in cupcake liners like I have done here, put them on lollipop sticks, or wrap them in cellophane with pretty bows.”

• 1/2 cup sugar

• 1/2 cup honey

• 3 tablespoons Nutella, or chocolate peanut butter

• 3 tablespoons butter

• 12 cups popped popcorn

• additional butter

• Latex or vinyl gloves (to protect hands from hot, sticky candy while forming

Balls)

Pop popcorn. Combine sugar, honey, Nutella, and butter in a saucepan.  Heat over medium heat until it boils. Cook until mixture reaches hard ball stage, 250 – 266 degrees.

Combine popcorn and hot Nutella mixture in a large bowl. Mix well with a spoon. Butter gloved hands well. Form popcorn balls in hands, pressing popcorn together and squeezing balls so that the popcorn sticks together.

Let cool completely on cookie sheet or in cupcake liners as shown.

Makes 12 popcorn balls.

Trick or Treat Popcorn Balls

=====================

8 cups air-popped popcorn

1 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup light corn syrup

1/3 cup water

1 tablespoon butter

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1 cup orange gumdrops

1/2 cup red gumdrops

1/2 cup yellow gumdrops

Place popped corn in mixing bowl; set aside.

In small saucepan, over medium-high heat, bring sugar, corn syrup, water, margarine, and salt to boil. Cook, stirring, until sugar dissolves. Cook, without stirring, for ten minutes or until reaches hard-ball stage of 254 degrees F on candy thermometer. Remove from heat.

Wearing oven mitts to shield against splatters, carefully stir in vanilla extract. Pour over popped corn; using prepared spoon, toss until well coated. Stir in gumdrops.

Wearing rubber gloves, form into 2-inch balls; let cool on baking sheet.

286 Calories; 1g Fat (2% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 71g Carbohydrate; 0mg Cholesterol; 135mg Sodium

Halloween Popcorn Balls

=======================

In Diana’s Recipe Book

Servings: 24

Ingredients:

20 cups popped popcorn

1-1/2 cups light-colored corn syrup

1-1/2 cups sugar

1 7-ounce jar marshmallow creme

2 tablespoons butter

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1-1/2 cups candy-coated milk chocolate pieces or candy-coated peanut butter-flavored pieces

Instructions:

Remove all unpopped kernels from popped popcorn. Place popcorn in a buttered 17x12x2-inch baking pan or roasting pan. Keep popcorn warm in a 300 degree F (150 C) oven while preparing marshmallow mixture.

In a large saucepan bring corn syrup and sugar to boiling over medium-high heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Stir in marshmallow creme, butter, and vanilla until combined.

Pour marshmallow mixture over hot popcorn; stir gently to coat. Cool until popcorn mixture can be handled easily. Stir in candies. With damp hands, quickly shape mixture into 3-inch-diameter balls. Wrap each popcorn ball in plastic wrap. Store at room temperature up to 1 week.

Makes 24 popcorn balls.

Variations: Popcorn Cake: Turn popcorn mixture into a buttered 10-inch tube pan. Press gently into pan with spatula or damp hands. Let stand about 30 minutes; remove and slice like cake.

To Present This As a Gift: You will need a white glass bowl with lip, glass paint pens in black, orange, green, and silver.

Wash and dry the bowl. Avoid touching the areas to be painted. Paint “Halloween” around the rim of the bowl, drawing pumpkins for the Os and between each word as desired. Let dry. Bake the painted glassware in oven if instructed by the paint manufacturer. Let cool.

Also Try This: Use Halloween stickers in place of painted jack-o’-lanterns.

Source: DianasDesserts.com Date: October 14, 2003

Sweet Popcorn Balls

===================

From Country Living

“We make this wholesome popcorn treat with an eclectic mix of dried fruit for concentrated bursts of fruit flavor.”  ~Charles Schiller

Ingredients

12 cup(s) popped popcorn

3 cup(s) mixed dried fruit such as golden raisins, cherries, and chopped apricots and figs

1-1/4 Cup(s) granulated sugar

3/4 cup(s) brown sugar

1 cup(s) corn syrup

1/2 cup(s) water

Directions

Toss popcorn and dried fruit together in a large, lightly oiled, heatproof bowl.

Oil 2 waxed paper-lined baking pans and a long metal fork. Set aside.

Bring sugar, brown sugar, corn syrup, and water to a boil over medium-high heat in a medium saucepan fitted with a candy thermometer.

Reduce heat to medium and cook until mixture reaches 260 degrees F.

Carefully pour the syrup over the popcorn mixture. Stir with the fork to distribute. Let sit for 1 to 2 minutes.

With well-oiled hands, form 3-inch balls, place on pans, and cool completely.

Store in an airtight container for up to 4 days.

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SUKKOT

Posted on October 13, 2011. Filed under: Brownies, Cheese, Cherries, Chocolate, Cookies, Cupcakes, Dairy, Desserts, Dinner/Supper, Ethnic Recipe, Family, Fish, Honey, Jello, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Lemons, Menu, My Ramblings, Pears, Pineapple, Recipes, Sukkot, Sukkot Recipes, Traditions, Tried and True Recipe, Vegetables, Vegetarian | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


The holiday of Sukkot begins on the 15th day of the month of Tishrei. Known in rabbinic literature as Ha-Chag–“the holiday”–the themes of Sukkot are clearly of high importance in Jewish theology.  Sadly, many Jews, including myself, really don’t celebrate it.  Perhaps we have a festive meal and perhaps we are lucky enough to be invited to eat dinner in a sukkah (open air booth) built by a friend or family member.  Or perhaps our synagogue has a communal meal to celebrate that we can take part in.  In part it is the fault of our school system here in the U.S.  In part it is the fault of today’s world.  And in part, it is the fault of our parents and/or of us.  We have to take so much time off for Rosh  Hashanah and Yom Kippur that we tell ourselves (and it is probably not far from the truth) that we will be fired if we take too much time off from our jobs, even if it is for religious reasons.  At one time employers may have been more sympathetic to our needs, but not any longer.  Our children are allowed to miss only so many days a year and here in the North that means we have to plan missed snow days.  Don’t forget that kids get sick, especially during the winter, as we adults also do.  Doctor appointments, dental appointments, “tummy ache” days, they all add up.  So how can we allow our children to take time off?  Even if we did insist they take the time off, how are they ever going to catch back up with the other kids, let alone bypass them in the race for college scholarships, let alone college admittance?  So our observance of Sukkot, the most beautiful of our holidays, and one of the most important of our holidays takes a back burner to the secular world and our secular lives.  I am glad to say that more and more people that I know do take the time to build their own personal sukkahs and take the time to celebrate.  Last year Paul and I were invited to our Cousin Susan’s sukkah along with many other people.  Susan is the hostess with the moistest and her sukkah and sukkah party were no exception.  This year we have been invited to our good friends’ The Sterns, sukkah for an intimate family dinner.  We are hoping that the weather will be with us so we can at least do the ceremonial part of the meal in the sukkah, if not have our entire meal out there beneath the stars.  I know in Kingston, my step-son-in-law and grandson are helping to build their synagogue’s sukkah and will be celebrating there with the temple family.  My mom will be going to my Aunt’s house or my cousin’s house.

The symbolism of the sukkah is a strong reminder of the dwellings of the biblical Israelites as they wandered in the desert for 40 years after the exodus from Egypt. In this manner, these temporary dwellings return us to a different time in our development and remind us of our journey to nationhood.  That answers the question “is Judaism” a nation?  Yes, in part it is.

Another symbolic definition of the sukkah is that it binds us to G-d as we recall our dependence on him for our daily needs and we celebrate all that he does for us.  We are commanded to be joyous during the whole holiday period (7 days) of Sukkot. We are told that it is a worse sin to be sad during this period than to have a sip of water on Yom Kippur.  I had no idea until I started writing this article of just how important Sukkot is in Judaism.

People take great pride in decorating their sukkah, but it is always decorated with fruits and greenery to remind us that Sukkot is a harvest holiday.  I went rummaging through the Net to find some pictures of the coolest sukkahs.  Here are some I think gives you an idea of the different types of sukkahs you can find.

This is a very basic sukkah.  I found it at the Mont Clair Jewish Organization’s website.

This picture is of a pre-fab sukkah that you can purchase.  I found this picture at Tzvee’s Talmudic Blog.

This is a great example of a sukkah decorated with fruits and greens.  Click on the photo to go to HWPS Organization’s website.

This is my favorite.  I love that it is decorated with colorful paper chains like the ones I made as a child in addition to the fruit and grains.  I was very impressed with the article on Sukkot that this photo was a part of.  Click on to the website after you finish reading my article.  This sukkah, I think is in Israel.  The website is called “Israelity.com.”

“There is also a commandment in the Torah for each person to take the fruit of a “goodly tree,” later interpreted as a fruit called an etrog (citron). Along with this fruit, one must collect certain tree branches and rejoice before God. We therefore take a palm branch and connect to it myrtle twigs and willow branches. There are beautiful narratives in rabbinic literature that discuss the symbolic images of the etrog and lulav (as the combination of the palm, myrtle, and willow is collectively known). They include parallels to the Jewish matriarchs and patriarchs as well as to the body and soul of each individual Jew.”[1]

There are other themes but my typing time is running out and I do want to share a Succot Menu and recipes with you.  For more information, click on the footnote and read the article where I found most of my information.  This menu is for a buffet meal.  The recipes are included for menu items that have an asterisk at the end of the name of the item.

DISCLAIMER:  The only photos that look like the recipes they go with are the Mandel Bread and the Russian Tea Cookies and the mini cupcakes.  Where I could, for the graphics, I attached links to them.

Just click on the picture.

SUCCOT MENU

Raisin Challah for the Blessing

Wine for the Blessing

Tossed Salad with Pomegranate Seeds

Smoked White Fish Salad purchased from a Kosher Deli or a grocery store that carries it

Egg Salad OR Deviled Eggs

Crackers

Aunt Hushie’s Salmon Balls served with Rice*

Roasted Vegetable Lasagna*

Luchshen Kugel*

Molded Fruit Salad*

Al Fuchsman’s Mandel Bread (cookies)*

Chewy Brownies*

Russian Tea Cookies*

Mini Pumpkin Spice Cupcakes with Cinnamon Chip Icing*

Coffee, Tea, Fruit Punch or Soft Drinks, Water

Aunt Hushie’s Salmon Balls

==========================

1 pound Salmon plus liquid

1 small Onion; grated

1 small Carrot; grated

2 Eggs; beaten

1/2 cup Matzah Meal OR Corn Flake Crumbs

Salt

Pepper

Dash of Nutmeg

MUSHROOM SAUCE:

1 Onion; diced and browned

1/2 cup diced, cooked Carrots & liquid

1 small can Mushrooms & Liquid

1/8 teaspoon Ginger

1/8 teaspoon Nutmeg

Salt

Pepper

3/4 cup Ketchup

3/4 cup Water

Mix salmon & liquid, small onion, small carrot, 2 eggs, matzah meal, salt, pepper and dash of nutmeg together and allow to set for 10 mins.

With WET hands, form into small balls (golf size balls), roll in crumbs and fry quickly.  Drain on paper towels.

SAUCE:

Mix together all sauce ingredients. Pour sauce into GREASED baking pan.  Place patties on sauce and heat in 350 degree oven UNCOVERED for 20-30 mins.

This is a wonderful recipe for brunches and luncheons. We have made many times and always get raves.  This was first made for us by my Aunt Hushie and it was Helen Schiller’s recipe (a friend of my Aunt’s) from my older edition of Rochester Hadassah Cookbook.  Please note that Aunt Hushie taught me to make this recipe in the large disposable aluminum 9×13-inch pans.  If you place the patties by the markings on the side of the pan, it works perfectly.  Also note that whenever my Aunt or I have made this recipe, we usually triple it.  I’ve made it for showers and other special occasions, so I think it is perfect for a dairy meal for Sukkot. ~Marilyn aka Softa123

 

 

 

Fruit Noodle Kugel          

===================

1 (16 ounce) package broad egg noodles

3/4 cup sugar

2 eggs, slightly beaten

1/2-1 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 pound butter

2 grated Winesap apples

2 grated pears

1/2 cup orange juice

1/2-1 c. white raisins

Cook noodles in boiling salted water 25-30 minutes. Strain and rinse with cold water. Add butter to noodles and mix until melted. Add sugar,eggs, cinnamon, fruits, juices and raisins. Mix gently. Pour intogreased 9 x 13 x 2 inch Pyrex dish. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 1/2 to 2hours, depending upon crustiness desired. Serve warm or cold.

Softa123’s aka Marilyn’s Note:  I have not tried this recipe yet, but I think it sounds perfect for Sukkot as it features pears in addition to the normal apples and raisins.  Also, what is nice about this recipe is that it is parve, so it can be eaten with either a dairy or a meat meal.

 

 

 

 

Roasted Vegetable Lasagna

=========================

By: preciousmom

PRECIOUS MOM’S NOTE:  “My first try with a vegetarian lasagna.”

Prep Time: 50 Min

Cook Time: 45 Min

Ready In: 1 Hr 35 Min

Servings: 9

Ingredients

1 pound eggplant, sliced into 1/4 inch rounds

1/2 pound medium fresh mushrooms cut into 1/4 inch slices

3 small zucchini, cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch slices

1 onion, chopped

3 tablespoons olive oil

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

1 (15 ounce) container reduced-fat ricotta cheese

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

2 eggs, beaten

1 (26 ounce) jar meatless spaghetti sauce

1 can of Italian diced tomatoes

12 no-boil lasagna noodles

2 cups shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese

3 tablespoons minced fresh basil

Directions

Line two 15-in. x 10-in. x 1-in. baking pans with foil.  Place all vegetables (except onions) in a zip lock back with the oil, salt and pepper. Shake the bag to make sure everything is coated and let sit for 5 minutes.

Place eggplant and mushrooms on a pan. Place the zucchini on the second pan. Bake, uncovered, at 400 degrees F for 15 minutes. Turn vegetables over. Bake 15 minutes longer. Remove eggplant, onions and mushrooms.

Bake zucchini 5-10 minutes longer or until edges are browned.

Sauté onion in a skillet with olive oil. Add in the tomatoes and spaghetti sauce. Let sit for about 5 minutes.

In a bowl, combine the ricotta cheese, Parmesan cheese and egg substitute. Spread about 1/4 cup pasta sauce in a 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking dish coated with nonstick cooking spray.

Layer with four lasagna noodles (noodles will overlap slightly), half of ricotta cheese mixture, half of vegetables, a third of pasta sauce and 2/3 cup mozzarella cheese. Sprinkle with half of basil. Repeat layers. Top with the remaining noodles and pasta sauce.

Cover and bake at 350 degrees F for 40 minutes. Uncover; sprinkle with remaining cheese. Bake 5-10 minutes longer or until edges are bubblyand cheese is melted. Let stand for 10 minutes before cutting.

Molded Fruit Salad          

===================

1 pkg. lemon Jell-O

1 c. hot water

1/2 c. creamy cottage cheese

1/2 c. broken walnut meats

1/2 c. maraschino cherries, quartered

1 c. crushed pineapple, well drained

1 c. heavy cream, whipped

Dissolve gelatin in hot water; chill until partially set. Fold in cottage cheese, whipped cream, walnuts, cherries, and pineapple. Pour into pan and chill until firm. Cut in squares and serve on lettuce.

Al Fuchsman's Mandel Bread

 

Al Fuchsman’s Mandel Bread

Source:  The Washington Post, November 28, 2007

  • • Cuisine: Eastern European
  • • Course: Dessert, Snack

Summary:

“Many cultures and cuisines have their own version of this crisp bread that is eaten as a cookie. Dotty Fuchsman says her husband’s is “world famous” because they have taken it to England and Israel.
The mandel bread can be stored in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks; the Fuchsmans prefer to wrap it well and freeze it for up to 2 months.”

Makes 64 to 100 slices/cookies

Ingredients:

• 1 cup canola oil, plus more for greasing the baking sheets (optional)

• 5 cups bread flour

• 2 tablespoons yellow cornmeal

• 1 cup sugar

• 1 teaspoon salt

• 2 teaspoons baking powder

• 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

• 1 cup whole raw unsalted almonds, cut into 3 pieces per nut

• 3/4 cup dried cranberries or raisins

• 5 large egg whites, plus 1 whole egg

• 2 teaspoons almond extract

• 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

• 1/3 cup water

• Juice of 1 medium lemon or lime (2 to 3 tablespoons)

• Cinnamon-sugar mixture, for sprinkling

 

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a large rimmed baking sheet with canola oil or nonstick cooking oil spray.

Combine the bread flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, almonds and dried cranberries or raisins in a large bowl.

Combine the egg whites, egg and oil in a separate bowl; blend well. Add the almond and vanilla extracts, water and citrus juice. Add to the bowl of dry ingredients; mix and knead the dough until it achieves the consistency of putty. Divide the dough into 4 equal portions and form them into bars on the baking sheet, roughly 3 inches by 12 inches by 3/4 inches thick, spaced apart so they do not touch. Bake for about 20 minutes, and then transfer the pan to a wire rack to cool for about 10 minutes; the bars will be warm and slightly set.

Meanwhile, position an oven rack 4 to 5 inches from the top broiling element and preheat the broiler. Have ready 2 large, same-size baking sheets.

Use a very sharp knife to cut the bars into 1/2-inch or 3/4-inch slices; there should be about 16 to 25 slices per bar. Working in batches, lay the bars flat on a baking sheet (about 36 should fit snugly on 1 sheet) and sprinkle with the cinnamon-sugar mixture. Toast under the broiler for 5 to 8 minutes or until the edges are brown and the sugar has melted. Remove from the oven and carefully place a second baking sheet on top of the toasted slices. Use oven mitts to hold the sheets together and carefully flip over; remove the top baking sheet so that the untoasted second sides of the slices are exposed. Sprinkle with the cinnamon-sugar mixture and return to broil for 5 to 8 minutes. Transfer the slices to a wire rack to cool thoroughly; the slices should be crisp.

Original Recipe Source:

From Annandale resident Al Fuchsman.

Nutritional Information:

66 calories, 3g fat, 0g saturated fat, 2mg cholesterol, 35mg sodium, 8g carbohydrates, 0g dietary fiber, n/a sugar, 1g protein.

I love brownies...all kinds of brownies!

Chewy Brownies

==============

Ingredients:

6 medium eggs, beaten

3 cups of sugar

2-1/4 cups of flour

1 cup of melted margarine

6 tablespoons of cocoa

2 teaspoons of vanilla

1-1/2 teaspoons of salt

1 teaspoon of baking powder

1 large packet of walnuts, broken

Preparation Instructions:

Combine the melted margarine, cocoa, and the sugar.  Add the six beaten eggs.

Mix together the flour, salt and baking powder and add to other mixture.  Add the vanilla and broken walnuts.

Bake in a greased and floured 18*12 inch jelly roll pan at 375°F (190°C) for 20 minutes.

Russian Tea Cookies...Yummy in my tummy!

Russian Tea Cookies

===================

1/2 cup Vegetable Shortening

2 cups Flour

4 tablespoons Sugar

1/2 cup Butter OR Margarine

2 teaspoons Vanilla Extract

1-1/2 cups Nuts; ground

Confectionary Sugar

Cream shortening, margarine and sugar. Add vanilla extract, flour and nuts. Form little balls of dough with teaspoon of batter. Place on UNGREASED cookie sheets.

Bake 30 minutes at 300 degrees. After cooling for 15 minutes, roll balls in confectionery sugar.

Makes 4 1/2 dozen cookies.

SOFTA123’S AKA MARILYN’S NOTE:  These are delicious and addictive!!  I  first made this recipe for my eldest nephew, Dov’s, Bar Mitzvah. That was About 15 years ago if I did the math correctly, and I’ve been making them ever since.  I do suggest doubling the recipe.  You won’t regret it!  This is one of my all-time favorite cookies!  Recipe came from the “Rochester Hadassah Cookbook.”

 

I have to try this recipe, don't you?

Mini Pumpkin Spice Cupcakes with Cinnamon Chip Icing

 

“Simple, two ingredient recipe”.

 

1 box spice cake mix
1 15 oz. can pure pumpkin

Mix both ingredients together thoroughly and fill mini cupcake liners almost to the top. These cupcakes will not rise that much and will not shape naturally. Bake at 350 degrees for 12-15 minutes, checking with the toothpick test.

For the icing:

1 stick unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 1/2 – 3 cups powdered sugar, as needed
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 tbsp. honey
1 tbsp. cinnamon
4 oz. Hershey’s cinnamon chips, melted and cooled

Whip the butter on medium-high speed for 5 minutes, scraping the bowl when necessary. Reduce the speed to low and gradually add the powdered sugar. Once all of the powdered sugar is incorporated, increase the speed to medium-high and add the vanilla, honey, and cinnamon mixing until incorporated. Add the melted cinnamon chips and whip at medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes, scraping the bowl as needed. Then, ice the cupcakes!

Sprinkle with cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice.

Source: http://www.sprinklemassacre.com/2011/10/06/mini-pumpkin-spice-cupcakes/

NOTE FROM SOFTA123:  I apologize for not posting this article sooner but real life interrupted.  I hope that this will not happen again, but I know better than to say never!


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Rosh Hashanah Countdown – Day 1

Posted on September 28, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Desserts, Giveaways, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Photoshop, Photoshop CS3, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, Scrapbooking Freebie | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |


Well, tonight we begin feasting in honor of Rosh Hashanah. In honor of this wonderful holiday of new beginnings, I wanted to give you all a gift. I hope you enjoy it. It is a gift of digital scrapbooking items that I designed for Rosh Hashanah. I hope you take lots of pictures so you can enjoy my gift! Here is the link for the file containing papers, word art, 1 quickpage and 1 frame. http://www.4shared.com/folder/eSBwD81f/ROSH_HASHANAH_FREEBIE.html Please be aware that the thumbnail previews don’t do the papers, etc. justice. The cropping mechanism they used didn’t crop them very well, but if you click on the thumbnail, you can see the whole graphic.Also, I have the last honey cake recipe for our countdown.

There will be lots of buzzing when you serve this beehive cake!

Beehive Cake Recipe
===================
Photo by: Taste of Home

Guests at my fun Bee Tea thought this cake was so cute! To make the hive’s different-sized cake layers, I just searched through my kitchen drawers and Cabinets and found containers I had on hand to bake the tiers. Honey adds character to the spice cake’s flavor. -Sheila Bradshaw, Columbus, Ohio

10-12 Servings

Prep: 15 min. Bake: 55 min. + cooling

Ingredients

1 package (18-1/4 ounces) spice cake mix
1-1/4 cups water
3 eggs
1/2 cup honey
1/3 cup canola oil
1 can (16 ounces) vanilla frosting
9 to 10 drops yellow food coloring
1 chocolate wafer (2-1/2 inches)

Directions

In a large bowl, combine the cake mix, water, eggs, honey and oil on
low speed for 30 seconds. Beat on medium for two minutes.

Grease and flour a 6-oz. and a 10-oz. custard cup and a 1-1/2-qt. round baking dish.

Pour 1/3 cup batter into the 6-oz. cup, 1 cup batter into the 10-oz.
cup and the remaining batter into the baking dish.

Bake the small cake at 350° for 30-35 minutes, the medium cake for
40-45 minutes and the large cake for 55-60 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from dishes to wire racks to cool completely.

In a large bowl, beat frosting and food coloring until smooth.

Place large cake on a serving plate; spread with frosting. Top with
medium cake; frost. Top with small cake; frost top and sides of entire cake.

Using a wooden spoon and beginning at bottom of cake, make circles in frosting around cake to form the beehive.

Position chocolate wafer at the base for the entrance.

Yield: 10-12 servings.

Nutrition Facts: 1 serving (1 piece) equals 467 calories, 19 g fat (5 g saturated fat), 64 mg cholesterol, 426 mg sodium, 70 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, 4 g protein.

Beehive Cake published in Taste of Home August/September 2002, p37

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 2

Posted on September 27, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Cherries, Dairy, Desserts, Family, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Lemons, My Ramblings, Paerve, Parve, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |


Today I haven’t felt well so this is a short one…just enough to post today’s honey cake recipe. Tomorrow look for a Rosh Hashanah Gift from me to you.

Just a note…I want to say how proud I am of my step-daughter. Rhona made 14 challahs yesterday and is making 11 more today! WTG, Rhona!!! Being out of work for a while made Rhona go crazy, so she decided to go into the challah-making business. She’s just beginning and does it mostly for people from her synagogue. But word of mouth is making business boom for the holidays. She even has my grandson, Marc, working for her! He gets the profits from whatever he makes. Rhona tells me he is an expert braider now. So, it goes to show you, you don’t have to sit back in these lean times. Keep up the good work, Rhona!

My husband is out shopping for Yom Tov groceries. I can’t wait to see what he brings home. I’m going down in a bit to take the brisket out of the freezer so I can make it tomorrow.

Here’s today’s honey cake recipe. Don’t forget, keep your eyes out for tomorrow’s post and in case you can’t stop by tomorrow, I’ll take the time now to wish all of you and yours a Sweet, Happy, Healthy, Wealthy, Love-Filled New Year! L’Shanah Tova Tikatavu.

Golden Crown Honey Cake

Golden Crown Honey Pound Cake
=============================
Makes 3 loaves

1 cup Butter or margarine
3 eggs
1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon vanilla
1 tablespoon grated lemon peel
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup whole maraschino cherries, drained
1/2 cup broken pecans

Bring butter and eggs to room temperature.

In large mixer bowl, beat butter on medium speed of electric mixer
about 1 minute. Gradually add honey, then sugar; beat 5 to 7 minutes
after all honey and sugar are added.

Add vanilla and lemon peel; mix well. Add eggs one at a time; beat
after each addition. Scrape bowl frequently.

Combine flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda; mix well.

Add flour mixture to egg mixture; beat on low speed only until
ingredients are blended; gently stir in cherries and pecans. Pour
batter into three* (6 x 3-1/4 x 2-1/2 in.) greased and floured loaf
pans.

Bake at 325°F 40 to 50 minutes or until wooden toothpick inserted near
center comes clean. Cool 15 minutes in pan. Remove from pan; cool
completely on wire rack.

Makes 3 loaves.

*One 9 x 5 x 3-inch loaf pan may be used. Bake at 325°F about 60
minutes.

Prep Time: About 30 minutes

Bake Time: Less than 1 hour

Serving Suggestion: For gift-giving, wrap in colored plastic wrap.

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 3

Posted on September 26, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Apricots, Breads - Yeast, Cakes, Cherries, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Jewish Prayers & Blessings, Kosher Recipe, Lemons, My Ramblings, Oranges, Parve, Peaches, Pies, Poultry, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |


3
 The gematria of the Hebrew letter ג
 A symbol of holiness. The Holy of Holies occupied one-third, and the Holy Place two-thirds, of the entire Temple.
 There were three vessels each for the altar of burnt offering, the altar of incense, and the Ark.
 The candlestick had twice three arms (besides the shaft, which also held a lamp), and each arm had three knobs.
 The priestly blessing consists of three sections (Num. vi. 24, 25)
 In kedusha, word “holy” is recited three times.
 The patriarchs of the Jewish people
 The number of prayers recited daily
 The number of Shabbat meals
 The number of shofar sounds
 The Shalosh Ragalim (Jewish festivals): Pesach, Shavuot, and Sukkot]
 Number of aliyot for a Torah reading on a weekday or at mincha
 Date in Tishrei of the Fast of Gedalia

SOFTA123’S NOTE: Glossary for the above will appear at the end of this post, after the honey cake recipe. The above I found at Wikipedia.com and for the glossary definitions I went to both Wikipedia.com and Chabad.org.

I was just searching for something to inspire me to write about today when I read a wonderful article by by Rabbi Benjamin Blech which was posted on Aish.com’s website. The article was entitled “Can we be optimistic about the coming new year?” I highly recommend reading this article. Anyhow, in reading this article, I came up with the inspiration of finding out the Judaic symbolism of the number for number 3 (as today is Countdown Day Number 3) and write about lists of three. But first I wanted you to see what the Judaic meaning of the number is according to an article I found on Wikipedia.org. That is the reason why I began this post the way I did. Ok, so this post is all about me.

MY MOST IMPORTANT 3

My three grandchildren: (In order of birth)

Marc
Rachael
Joshua

3 OF MY FAVORITE WOMEN

My Mother
My Aunt Hushie
Golda Meir

3 OF MY FAVORITE MEN

My Father
My Uncle Hockey
My Husband

3 OF MY FAVORITE MEMORIES

Marrying my husband
Throwing my parents surprise parties
The birth of all three of my grandchildren (ok, so I cheated…I know this should be three separate items, but it’s my blog so I can make up my own rules!)

3 WORLD EVENTS I VIVIDLY REMEMBER

The 1972 Munich Olympics when 11 Israeli athletes were killed by 5 Arab terrorists.
The 1976 Raid on Entebbe
9/11
The Assassination of President Kennedy

I had to include 4 events here because there was no way that I could exclude any of these four horrible events.

3 OF MY FAVORITE WORDS

Oy
Love
Great

3 OF MY FAVORITE BOOKS

God’s Game by Father Andrew Greeley
Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon
The Eight by Katherine Neville

3 OF MY FAVORITE MOVIES

Backstreet
Beloved Infidel
A Man and A Woman

3 OF MY FAVORITE SONGS

Maggie May – Rod Stewart
500 Miles – Bob Dillon
Atlantis – Donovan

3 OF MY FAVORITE FOODS

Potato Latkes
Potato Kugel
Hot Dogs

3 OF MY FAVORITE THINGS TO DO

Read with my husband
Blog
Crochet

Now, in honor of the number 3, I will post 3 extra recipes for your Rosh Hashanah celebration!

A Sweet Treatment for Chicken!

Cardamom Honey Chicken
======================

Filed under Chicken, Gluten-Free, Main Course

Cardamom Honey Chicken Recipe

Ingredients

Marinade

4 tablespoons Honey
2 tablespoons Sherry
1 teaspoon Cardamom Seeds; ground with mortar and pestle
1 teaspoon Peppercorns; ground

Chicken

6 Chicken Breasts OR one whole Chicken, cut into parts
2 tablespoons Olive Oil
1 Lemon; thinly sliced
Salt and pepper

ELISE’S NOTE: “On my recent trip to New Zealand, my hosts sent me home with a wonderful cookbook from BeesOnline, a local café and honey factory right outside Auckland. The Cardamom and Honey-Glazed Chicken recipe caught our eye and we made it a few days ago. I’ve never thought to use cardamom as a spice for chicken before; the result was quite fragrant and delicious. The leftovers made for a flavorful chicken salad the next day.”

Posted by Elise on Jul 2, 2006

Method

ELISE’S NOTE: If a recipe calls for ground cardamom, it is best to start with whole pods. Break open the pods to release the tiny brown and black cardamom seeds. Use a spice grinder or mortar and pestle to grind the seeds.

1 PREHEAT oven to 390°F. Warm the honey, stir in the sherry, cardamom and peppercorns. Place marinade and chicken in a LARGE bowl, coat chicken with marinade. COVER with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.

2 Heat olive oil in a LARGE frying pan at MEDIUM-HIGH heat. Sear the chicken, skin side down, until golden.

3 Place lemon slices in a roasting pan. Lay the chicken pieces on top. Brush with the marinade. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Place in the oven and bake until done, approximately 15 minutes for breasts, 20 minutes for thighs, wings, and drumsticks.

Remove from oven and LET REST for 10 minutes BEFORE serving. Pour out drippings from the pan into a gravy boat for gravy.

Serve with rice, mashed potatoes, or couscous.

Honey Apple Pie With Orange Lattice Crust

Honey Apple Pie With Orange Lattice Crust
=========================================

Source: Bon Appétit | March 1998

User rating: 4 forks

Main ingredients: Honey, Cherry, Orange, Peach, Apricot, Apple

Cuisine: American

Type: Pie/Tart

Yield: Makes 8 servings

“Using orange juice instead of water in the crust enhances the fruit flavors in the filling. To prevent the dough from sticking, lightly flour the work surface and the dough, sprinkling with more flour as needed; also, roll just to the edges of the dough, not over them, rotating the dough often. “

Ingredients:

For crust:

2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons chilled vegetable shortening, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
6 to 7 tablespoon chilled orange juice

For filling:

2 generous tablespoons coarsely chopped dried tart cherries
2 generous tablespoons finely chopped dried apricots
2 generous tablespoons finely chopped dried peaches
2 tablespoons orange juice
2-1/2 pounds Golden Delicious apples, peeled, cored, thinly sliced
3-1/2 tablespoons all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted
1 tablespoon grated orange peel

Preparation :

Make crust:

Combine flour, sugar and salt in large bowl; add butter. Using fingertips, rub in butter until pieces range in size from rice grains to peas. Add shortening; rub in until pieces are size of
small peas. Sprinkle 5 tablespoons juice over, tossing gently with fork to blend. Continue adding enough juice 1 tablespoon at a time, tossing with a fork, to form moist clumps. Gather dough into ball; divide into 2 parts, 1 slightly larger than the other. Flatten dough onto disks. Wrap in plastic; chill 1 1/2 hours or up to 1 day.

Make filling: Mix cherries, apricots, peaches and orange juice in large bowl. Let stand 30 minutes.

Mix in apples, flour, cinnamon and cardamom; then mix in honey, butter and orange peel.

Position rack in bottom third of oven, and preheat to 425°F.

Roll out larger dough disk on lightly floured surface to 13-inch round. Transfer dough to 9-inch-diameter glass pie dish. Trim overhand to 1/2 inch.

Roll out second dough disk on lightly floured surface to 12-inch round. Using fluted pastry wheel or knife, cut dough into 1/2-inch-wide strips.

Spoon filling into bottom crust.

Arrange 6 pastry strips evenly atop filling. Arrange 6 more strips at right angles, forming lattice. Fold under ends of strips with overhanging dough.

Crimp crust edge decoratively.

Bake pie 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F. Bake until apples are tender and juices bubble thickly around edge, about 1 hour 10 minutes longer. Transfer pie to rack. Cool 1 hour.

New Years Apple Challah

New Year’s Apple-Cinnamon Challah
=================================
Dough ingredients:

1 cup warm water (110 degrees F)
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup oil or melted butter
2 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla
2-1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons dry yeast
5 to 6 cup flour

Apple filling:

3 cups coarsely chopped apples
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon lemon juice (skip if apples are tart)

Egg wash:

1 beaten egg
1 teaspoon sugar
Coarse sugar, for sprinkling, optional

1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the first seven dough ingredients,
in order listed. Stir in a cup or two of the flour, and then add yeast.

2. Add enough additional flour to equal about 5 cups, and stir/knead
into a smooth dough, adding additional flour if needed. Knead dough for 8-10 minutes. Shape into a ball, place in a greased bowl, cover, and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 45-60 minutes.

3. Place apple filling ingredients in a medium bowl and toss to coat.
Set aside.

4. Punch down the risen dough, kneading to remove excess air bubbles.
On a lightly-floured surface, roll the dough into a large round, about 1/2-inch thick. Spread apple mixture over the dough.

5. Fold the edges of the dough over the apples and continue to
fold/roll the dough to make one big lump with the filling enclosed. Let rest 5 minutes.

6. Grease a 10-inch spring form pan. Place spring form pan on a large
cookie sheet (to catch any leaks during rising/baking).

7. Now, this part gets messy. Using a sharp knife (I use a serrated
one), cut off chunks of the dough and place them in the prepared pan.
You should end up with 15-20 chunks of dough (though a particular
number doesn’t matter). The apple pieces should be randomly dispersed
throughout the dough chunks. Sprinkle with any escaped apple pieces.

8. Combine the egg and sugar and then dab the egg wash over the top of the dough. Sprinkle with coarse sugar if desired. Cover gently with a piece of plastic wrap and place pan in a warm location to rise.

9. *When dough has almost doubled in size, pre-heat oven to 350 degrees and then place baking sheet/spring form in the middle of the oven (remove the piece of plastic wrap first, of course!!!) to bake for 45-55 minutes or until done.

POSTER’S NOTE: When I make this, usually the edges of the top get well-browned before the middle is cooked. So, after about 25-30
minutes, I cover the darker areas loosely with foil — sometimes
forming a large loose “ring” of foil (with no foil in the middle) to
lay on top.

10. When challah is done, remove from the oven and cool in the pan for 10 minutes. Turn out of pan onto a cooling rack and cover with a clean towel until completely cool.

Additional Poster’s Notes:

This recipe was passed to me from a friend, Cheryl O. I believe it is
originally from a Jewish cookbook. The instructions and photos are my
own. 🙂

Preparation Time:

1 hour (plus rising time) Cooking Time:

45-55 minutes or longer

SOFTA123’S NOTE: To make the challah truly Kosher, before baking take a piece of dough about the size of a golf ball, roll it into a ball and recite the following blessing over it:

Baruch ata Adonai, Eloheinu melech ha-olam, asher kideshanu be-mitzvosav ve-tzivanu lehafrish challah min ha-isah.

You are blessed, Lord our God, Sovereign of the world, Who made us holy with His commandments and commanded us to separate challah from the dough.

Then burn the ball (I let it bake alongside the challah) then throw it out. DO NOT EAT IT!!! This symbolizes the sacrifice given to the priests at the ancient Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

And for the grand finale….today’s honey cake recipe!

Pistachios in this recipe offer a nice change from walnuts.

Honey Cake
==========
Ingredients

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground clove
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 cups honey
1-1/2 cups orange juice
1/2 cup shelled white pistachio nuts
1/2 cup shelled walnuts
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup dried apricots cut in bite-size pieces
1 teaspoon unsalted margarine for greasing the baking pans
1/4 cup slivered almonds

Preparation

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

2. In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients together. Set aside.

3. In another bowl, mix the honey, orange juice, the nuts except the almonds and the dried fruits together.

4. Add the orange juice-honey mixture to the flour. Mix well with a wooden spoon.

5. Grease two 9-by-5-inch loaf pans with the margarine. Divide the batter evenly between the two pans.

6. Sprinkle the almonds on top of the batter.

7. Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees and bake for one hour and 45 minutes. Test to see if the cake is done by inserting a skewer in the center. If it comes out dry, the cake is done.

8. Cool the cakes on a rack. Loosen the sides before unmolding.

YIELD : 14 to 16 servings

Originally published with FOOD; HOPE AND HONEY By COLETTE ROSSANT, September 21, 1986

GLOSSARY

gematria – Gematria or gimatria (Hebrew: גימטריה‎, gēmaṭriyā) is a system of assigning numerical value to a word or phrase, in the belief that words or phrases with identical numerical values bear some relation to each other, or bear some relation to the number itself as it may apply to a person’s age, the calendar year, or the like. A good example of Gematria is the Hebrew word Chai (“life”), which is composed of two letters which add up to 18. This has made 18 a “lucky number” among Jews, and gifts in multiples of 18 are very common among Jews.

Holy of Holies – The Holy of Holies, as its name implies, was the most sacred part of the entire ancient Holy Temple in Jerusalem. Entry was forbidden except on Yom Kippur when the High Priest entered the Inner Sanctuary. In Hebrew it is called Kodesh HaKodashim.

priestly blessing – The priest(s) recite(s) aloud the fifteen words of the priestly blessing. In Hebrew it is called Birkat Kohanim. The Kohanim recite the blessings word-by-word as the Cantor recites them. The Birkat Kohanim are only said during Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur in the Diaspora.

‘May G d bless you and guard you.
‘May G d shine His countenance upon you and be gracious to you.
‘May G d turn His countenance toward you and grant you peace.'” (Numbers 6:24-26)

Last year, Paul and I accompanied Rhona, Jeremy and Marc to their synagogue for Rosh Hashanah services. At Congregation Ahavath Israel we were treated to the most poignant recitation and chanting of the Birkat Kohanim that I have ever been to. There an elderly father and his middle-age son, both with wonderful voices, chanted the Birkat Kohanim with such feeling that I was totally in awe. It is one of the things I will miss most by not going to Kingston to celebrate with Rhona, Jeremy and Marc this year. I wish that Scott, Lisa, Rachael and Joshua could experience Rosh Hashanah in Kingston with us.

kedusha – The Kedusha (Hebrew: קדושה‎) is traditionally the third section of all Amidah prayer recitations. The silent Amidah it is a short prayer, but in the repetition, which requires a minyan (10 men over the age of 13, although in Conservative and Reform congregations women over the age of 13 are also counted), it is considerably lengthier. The liturgy varies among different communities and during different services, but they all hold in common three lines from the Bible (though translations vary): Kadosh Kadosh Kadosh Adonai Tz’vaot M’lo Khol Ha’aretz K’vodo (“Holy, Holy, Holy, The Lord of Hosts, The entire world is filled with His Glory”), Baruch K’vod Adonai Mim’komo (“Blessed is the Glory of the Lord in Its Place”), and Yimloch Adonai L’Olam, Elohayich Tziyon L’dor Vador Hall’luyah (“The Lord shall reign forever, Your G-d, O Zion, from generation to generation, Hallelujah”)

The Kedusha is enhanced during the morning and Musaf services of Shabbat and Festivals and between the biblical verses there are more praises. The Musaf service of Shabbat and Festivals as well as all of the Kedushas of Yom Kippur additionally contain the opening line of the Shema prayer.

patriarchs – The three patriarchs of the Jewish people are Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

prayers – Jewish Law instructs Jews to pray three times a day, once in the morning, once in the afternoon and once in the evening. These prayers are called Shacharit (morning), Mincha (afternoon) and Maariv (evening).

Shabbat meals – On Shabbat (the Jewish Sabbath), Jews are required to eat three meals. The first one occurs on Friday night and is a lavish dinner. The second required meal is Saturday afternoon, after everyone goes to the synagogue to prey, and it also is a lavish meal. The third meal is Saturday evening and it is a light meal.

shofar – For an in depth description of the shofar (ram’s horn), please see my post of September 24, 2011. There are three sounds that the shofar makes tekiah, shevarim and teruah. Tekiah is a single long burst of the shofar, shevarim are three medium bursts and teruah is at least nine short bursts.

The Shalosh Ragalim – Jewish festivals Pesach (Passover also known as The Festival of Freedom) celebrates freedom, Sukkot (The Festival of Booths) celebrates Jewish unity, and Shavuot (The Festival of Weeks) celebrates the giving and receiving of the Torah and the 10 Commandments.

aliyot – Honors given at Torah services. There can be no more than seven honors given at one service. These honors include opening and closing the Ark, undressing and dressing the Torah, saying the Blessings over the Torah, carrying the Torah and reading the Torah.

Tishrei – Tishrei (pronounced Tish-ray) is the Hebrew month that corresponds to the Gregorian calendar months of September-October. It is the month in which the Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot are celebrated.

Fast of Gedalia – On the third day of Tishrei we mourn the assassination of Gedaliah ben Achikam, governor of the first Jewish commonwealth in the Holy Land. When Gedaliah was assinated, Jewish autonomy came to an end. In his honor and memory Jews fast on this day.

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ROSH HASHANNAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 4

Posted on September 25, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Cakes, Desserts, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, Lemons, My Ramblings, Paerve, Parve, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |


WHAT IF?

We think about the story of Adam and Eve frequently during our lives. We think how nice it would be if Adam and Eve had not eaten the forbidden fruit of the tree of knowledge. But do we really think about what that would mean?

ADAM AND EVE

1. What would our lives be like if Adam and Eve lived for eternity with all of their off-spring doing the same? I don’t think we’d all fit on this earth. So what would happen then? We would know no evil, so there would be no wars, so would we all starve to death? We wouldn’t know anger, so again, where would we all live?

2. If we didn’t have knowledge of good and evil, what would we do all day? Wouldn’t our lives be dull? We wouldn’t have to think if we didn’t have to choose which direction our life should go in. There would be only one direction…the straight and narrow. I think we would bore G-d in a very short time if we were blind sheep going through the motions of living day by day. You see, I like the theory that G-d has created us for his own game. Yes, hopefully, at the end of his game there will be a grand purpose to our lives, but first we need to let him play the game out. We need to do our part to make it a challenge (to a point) for him, thus we need free will. (I’m not really a free will type of person, I believe more that G-d has a grand final plan for us, but I do believe in free will…kind of a 50-50 chance type of belief.) You can’t have free will without knowledge of the good and the bad.

3. I also see G-d as a mischievous entity. In that light, could the serpent (who may have not been evil at all) have been G-d? Could he have taken on that persona to not only test us, but to direct us in the direction he wanted us to go? Wouldn’t G-d want us to experience life, so when his plan is revealed we can be worthy, not just robots?

4. So why did G-d make women suffer so for the sin of Eve? Does he really hate women? No, I don’t believe he does. I think he revels in women as he has given us such an important role to play. I think he makes us suffer in child birth in order to make us appreciate the gift of a life he gives us with each new child born. And, as Jews, we experience the knowledge of good and bad and often say, “without the bad, how could we appreciate the good?”, so wouldn’t G-d be the encourager of this attitude?

5. Also, if we didn’t have the good, the bad and the ugly (and the beautiful too), how could we soar to such marvelous heights as to be able to celebrate G-d and his love for us, and how could we make such important discoveries such as penicillin, the wheel, fire, water irrigation, the computer? Isn’t it through such things we feel a sense of pride and a reason for being?

6. And perhaps G-d has given us this knowledge so that when we do meet him in what we call “death” we will be truly thankful and know we did accomplish something, no matter how small that something is.

A Sweet Treat

So, when you go to Temple this Rosh Hashanah, think about these things, and please, share your thoughts here with us. Just leave a comment to this post with your feelings and ideas on this topic. Whatever you do while being in Temple this year, don’t just go through the motions. Think about what you are reading in the prayers and in the Torah and Haftorah portions. Wonder about your interpretation of what is really being said. Don’t sleep through the Rabbi’s sermon this year. Listen with an open mind. Most of all make this a wonderful New Year for you and for your family and friends.

To make this year a bit sweeter, here is today’s honey cake recipe.

Surprise your loved ones with this heart shaped cake!

Heart-Shaped Honey Apple Cake
================
Makes 9 servings

1/3 cup butter or margarine
1/3 cup packed brown sugar
2 eggs
1/3 cup honey
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1-1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 cup water
1 cup (1 medium) pared, cored, & chopped apple
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
Honey Apple Topping (Recipe at the end)

Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time; beat after each addition. Beat in honey and lemon peel.

Combine flour, baking powder, soda, spices and salt; mix well. Add to creamed mixture alternately with water; begin and end with dry ingredients.

Stir in apples and nuts.

Turn into greased and floured 9-inch heart-shaped or round cake pan.

Bake at 325°F for 45 to 55 minutes or until wooden toothpick inserted near center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes and remove from pan.

Cool completely. Brush top of cake with sauce from Honey Apple Topping; arrange topping on cake.

Nutrition: 349 Calories * 11.7 g Fat Total * 4.9 g Protein * 58.2 g
Carbohydrates * 250 mg Sodium * 86 mg Cholesterol * 2.0 g Dietary Fiber * 30.1%
Calories from Fat *

Honey Apple Topping

1/3 cup honey
2 Tablespoons rose wine
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
2 medium apples

Heat honey, rose wine and lemon juice. Core and slice 2 medium apples; add to honey. Cook until tender and glazed; turn slices halfway through cooking. Makes topping for 1 9-inch cake.

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ROSH HASHANA COUNTDOWN – DAY 5

Posted on September 24, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Desserts, Honey, Jewish, Jewish Music, Jewish Prayers & Blessings, Kosher Recipe, Paerve, Parve, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, Traditions | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |


The sound of the Shofar is music to our ears!

I am very proud to say that both my step-son-in-law and my step-grandson blow shofar and they join in with other members of their temple to sound it on Rosh Hashanah. My step-grandson, Marc, did an awesome job last year doing the bulk of the blowing. I am so proud of him. And I’m proud of my step-son-in-law, Jeremy, for instilling the traditions and the love of Judaism in Marc. I wish you could all hear Marc and Jeremy play. So I am dedicating this post to them.

To me, the sound of the shofar is sad yet somehow invigorating. I get choked up whenever I hear the shofar. It’s like a connection to all who came before me. I think I also get choked up because I know I should repent for what failings I have or had during the past years and I want to change but don’t know if I can, and when I was young, I would be standing with my younger sister between my parents to hear the sounding of the shofar and it was a moment of family togetherness. Now I stand next to my husband and feel his love for Judaism and me. Also I know that in a short while we will be sharing a delicious meal prepared by my step-daughter, Rhona. She’s a fantastic cook and a maven in the kitchen! Her challah cannot be beat!

Sadly, this year, we will not be joining Rhona nor my Mother and Aunt Hushie and Uncle Hockey nor our good friends Ellen, Gil and Sammy. Instead, we will join my step-son, Scott and my step-daughter-in-law, Lisa, and my step-grandchildren, Rachael and Josh. They don’t often get to celebrate Rosh Hashanah, so it is important for us to spend wonderful quality time with them. I look forward to seeing if Scott is going to make the matzah balls and if so, will they be from scratch or from a mix? It will be nice to be with them this year, especially because of Lisa’s return from the hospital and Paul’s return from the hospital too!

“The Bible calls the Rosh Hashanah, the day of the sounding of the Rams Horn.The Shofer is blown on all festivals and folkways. However legend has it that this was the day of which Adam was created out of clay. It was also the birthday of Abraham and Isaac and Jacob. It was the day on which Joseph was released from prison in Egypt, and it was the day Moses appeared before Pharaoh demanding that the Egyptian king let our people go. The shofer is blown every day in the month of Elul except on the Sabbath and provides the most impressive moment of the morning service. The Shofer is usually made from a Rams horn although it may also be made from the one of any of any kosher animal except the cattle or an ox. The horn is boiled in water until it gets soft.

The inside is then hollowed out and the horn is flattened slightly. The mouthpiece is then carefully shaped and the horn is put aside to harden.. Sometimes the shofer is made very long and very curved.
In biblical times the shofer was used to herald great moments. It proclaimed the ascent of a king upon the throne, it announced the Jubilee every 50th year and the beginning of the Shabbat and festivals. The shofar is also associated with the jubilee year in which, every fifty years, Jewish law provided for the release of all slaves, land, and debts. The sound of the shofar on Rosh Hashanah announced the jubilee year, and the sound of the shofar on Yom Kippur proclaimed the actual release of financial encumbrances.
In wartime it signaled the army.” http://mysite.verizon.net/~vze32qgw/Rosh_Hashana.htm

“The shofar was blown in the times of Joshua to help him capture Jericho. As they surrounded the walls, the shofar was blown and the Jews were able to capture the city. The shofar was commonly taken out to war so the troops would know when a battle would begin. The person who would blow the shofar would call out to the troops from atop a hill. All of the troops were able to hear the call of the shofar from their position because of its distinct sound.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shofar

In post-Biblical times, the shofar was enhanced in its religious use because of the ban on playing musical instruments as a sign of mourning for the destruction of the temple. (It is noted that a full orchestra played in the temple.) The shofar continues to announce the New Year and the new moon, to introduce Shabbat, to carry out the commandment to sound it on Rosh Hashanah, and to mark the end of the day of fasting on Yom Kippur once the services have completed in the evening. The secular uses have been discarded (although the shofar was sounded to commemorate the reunification of Jerusalem in 1967) [2]

The shofar is primarily associated with Rosh Hashanah. Indeed, Rosh Hashanah is called “Yom T’ruah” (or “Yom Teruah”) (the day of the shofar blast). In the Mishnah, (book of early rabbinic laws derived from the Torah), a discussion centers on the centrality of the shofar in the time before the destruction of the second temple (70 AD). Indeed, the shofar was the center of the ceremony, with two silver trumpets playing a lesser role. On other solemn holidays, fasts, and new moon celebrations, two silver trumpets were featured, with one shofar playing a lesser role. The expert who blows (or “blasts” or “sounds”) the shofar is termed the Tokea (lit. “Blaster”) or Ba’al T’qiah (lit. “Master of the Blast”). Being a Ba’al T’qiah (shofar sounder) is an honor. Every male Jew is eligible for this sacred office, providing he is acceptable to the congregation. “The one who blows the shofar on Rosh Hashanah . . . should likewise be learned in the Torah and shall be God-fearing; the best man available.” If a potential choice will cause dissension, he should withdraw his candidacy, even if the improper person will be chosen. See Shulkhan Arukh 3:72. If a blind blower was dismissed, but the community did not find a blower as proficient, he should be appointed as community blower.

According to the Talmud, a shofar may be made from the horn of any animal from the Bovidae family except that of a cow or calf (Rosh Hashanah, 26a), although a ram is preferable. (Mishnah Berurah 586:1). Bovidae horns are made of keratin (the same material as human toenails and fingernails). An antler, on the other hand, is not a horn but solid bone. Antlers cannot be used as a shofar because they cannot be hollowed out.

In practice two species are generally used: the Ashkenazi and Sefardi shofar is made from the horn of a domestic ram, while a Yemeni shofar is made from the horn of a kudu. A Moroccan Shofar is a flat Shofar with no curves besides the main curve; years ago, when the Moroccan Jews were not allowed to practice Judaism, it was easy to hide it in their clothes because of its flat shape.

A crack or hole in the shofar affecting the sound renders it unfit for ceremonial use. A shofar may not be painted in colors, but it may be carved with artistic designs (Shulkhan Arukh, Orach Chayim, 586, 17). Shofars (especially the Sephardi shofars) are sometimes plated with silver across part of their length for display purposes, although this invalidates them for use in religious practices.

The horn is flattened and shaped by the application of heat, which softens it. A hole is made from the tip of the horn to the natural hollow inside. It is played much like a European brass instrument, with the player blowing through the hole, causing the air column inside to vibrate. Sephardi shofars usually have a carved mouthpiece resembling that of a European trumpet or French horn, but smaller. Ashkenazi shofars do not.

Because the hollow of the shofar is irregular in shape, the harmonics obtained when playing the instrument can vary: rather than a pure perfect fifth, intervals as narrow as a fourth, or as wide as a sixth may be produced.

In modern times, the shofar is used mainly on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. It is blown in synagogues to mark the end of the fast at Yom Kippur, and blown at four particular occasions in the prayers on Rosh Hashanah. Because of its inherent ties to the Days of Repentance and the inspiration that comes along with hearing its piercing blasts, the shofar is also blown after morning services for the entire month of Elul, the last month of the Jewish civil year and the sixth of the Jewish ecclesiastical year. It is not blown on the last day of month, however, to mark the difference between the voluntary blasts of the month and the mandatory blasts of the holiday. Shofar blasts are also used during penitential rituals such as Yom Kippur Katan and optional prayer services called during times of communal distress. The exact modes of sounding can vary from location to location.

In an effort to improve the skills of shofar blowers, an International Day of Shofar Study is observed on Rosh Chodesh Elul, the start of the month preceding Rosh Hashanah.

In times of National Liberation such as during the Ottoman and the British rule of Jerusalem, Jews were not allowed to sound the shofar at the Western Wall. After the Six Day War, Rabbi Shlomo Goren famously approached the Wall and sounded the shofar. “
Footnote:

2. Judith Kaplan Eisenstein, Heritage of Music, New York: UAHC, 1972, pp. 44–45.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shofar

It’s way past my bedtime, it’s 2:39 a.m. according to my computer’s clock. So let me leave you with this honey cake recipe.

Yet Another Delicious Honey Cake Recipe!

Honey Cake W/Fruit Ii (P, Tnt)
==============================
Source: Great Aunt Rose Markowitz

Serves: 20

Fruit Mixture:

1/2 pound prunes, pitted
1 small can pineapple chunks
1/2 pound golden raisins
1 small can peaches

Cake:

1 cup shortening
2 cups sugar
8 eggs
1 pound honey
4 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon ground ginger
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup sweet red wine
1 cup strong black coffee, cooled
1 cup pecans, chopped (optional)
1 jar maraschino cherries, drained
Additional whole pecans for top, optional

Make Fruit Mixture:

In work bowl of food processor, grind fruit and set aside. This will make more fruit mixture than you will need for one cake so you can freeze the remainder.

Make Cake:

Grease bottom and sides of a 10-1/2″x15-1/2″ baking pan (large roasting pan). Line bottom with waxed or baking paper. If using
waxed paper, grease waxed paper also.

Preheat oven to 350°F.

In the large bowl of a mixer, cream shortening well, then add sugar and continue beating. Add eggs, one at a time, beating very well after each addition. Add honey, 3 heaping soup spoons full of ground fruit (remainder may be frozen for future use) and continue beating after each addition.

Sift flour, baking powder, and soda together, then add spices and
ground nuts. Combine wine and coffee. Alternate adding flour mixture
and coffee mixture to sugar/shortening mixture. Pour batter into baking pan.

Place cherries and nuts on top and bake for 1 to 1-1/2 hours. Do not
open oven door until the cake has been in the oven for an hour, then
test for doneness. Cake will be done when it begins to move away from
the sides of the pan or a cake tester inserted into the middle comes
out clean. Remove cake from oven and turn it out onto a cooling rack,
remove the waxed or baking paper, turn again and cool.

Sue Epstein’s Notes: Great Aunt Rose Markowitz was the matriarch of the Epstein family. A family simcha wasn’t a simcha without one of her honey cakes… and for good reason… it’s wonderful! When Aunt Rose gave me this recipe she said she lines the pan with waxed paper. Aunt Esther insisted that Aunt Rose lined it with aluminum foil! Aunt Esther also sprinkled cloves over the top of the cake before baking and used exactly 30 whole pecans to decorate it. Today, I line the pan with baking paper and I miss their friendly arguments. This cake is as good today as it was more than 50+ years ago when Aunt Rose first started making it.

Posted by Sue Epstein

Servings: 20

SOFTA123’S NOTE: Please note that the photo of the coffee cake is a generic photo that I found on the Internet. It is not a photo of this recipe. Also I’d like to thank Sue Epstein for sharing this recipe with us and may her Aunt Rose rest in peace.

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ROSH HASHANAH COUNTDOWN – DAY 6

Posted on September 23, 2011. Filed under: Apples, Cakes, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Honey, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Oranges, Paerve, Recipes, Rosh Hashannah Recipes, U.S. Politics, U.S. PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 2012 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |


PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 2012

While I was surfing and trying to think what I wanted to write about today I Stumbled! across an interesting article about Rick Perry entitled “Rick Perry Should Terrify Anyone With a Uterus” which was written by Kim Conte on September 21, 2011 and was posted at The Stir’s Cafemom. To read the entire article here is the link:
http://thestir.cafemom.com/in_the_news/126315/rick_perry_should_terrify_anyone

The more I learn about Rick Perry, the more afraid I become. If this man manages to become the Republican candidate for the 2012 Presidential Election, run to Canada or any other country, especially if you are middle class or poor. Run if you are just an average man or woman. Why am I saying this? Well, according to what I’ve read about Texas’ problems, especially in health care, I cringe. In my humble opinion, we have had enough of Texans in the Oval Office already. Look at the damage they did to health care. In New York State we have decent health care, although I complain about the costs as does everyone else. But at least we have the ability to get health insurance! If Perry gets elected, according to the above article, all health care will suffer, especially women’s health care. Why should we risk having the same troubles as Texas has? Ms. Conte states in her article that “…This year Perry and the Texas legislature cut funding for women’s health clinics by two-thirds. They said it’s to save money; but there’s no denying that Perry’s and other conservatives’ pro-life, anti-birth control agenda was a major factor in the decision. (In another post we can discuss the irony of Texas spending more than any other state on teen pregnancy.) Even if their primary goal was just to cut funding for family planning, they managed to put women’s health overall in jeopardy.” Don’t we want better for our country? For ourselves?

As a grandmother of an almost 16 year old young lady, I was appalled when I found out about Perry’s stand on the HPV vaccine issue. “The debate about Rick Perry and the HPV vaccine is a battle for the very soul of the Republican Party. Right now, Rick Perry is parading around the country talking about how “conservative” he is, but would a real conservative attempt to forcibly vaccinate 12 year old girls for a sexually transmitted disease? If Rick Perry really wants government to be as “inconsequential” in our lives as possible, then why did he issue an executive order that mandated that 12 year old girls in the state of Texas be injected with a highly controversial vaccine? Rick Perry did not even consult the Texas legislature and he spat right in the face of parental rights when he did this.” (This quote was found in an article at http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/category/politics.)

In an article entitled, “14 Reasons Why Rick Perry Would Be A Really, Really Bad President,” we are informed that “If Rick Perry becomes president, he will probably be very similar to George W. Bush. He will explode the size of the U.S. government and U.S. government debt, he will find sneaky ways to raise taxes, he will do nothing about the Federal Reserve or corruption in our financial system and he will push the agenda of the globalists at every turn.” Do we really want another 4-8 years of another George Bush? I know I don’t. (You can read this article at http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/14-reasons-why-rick-perry-would-be-a-really-really-bad-president.)

At the website 2012 The Presidential Candidates, I read that Mitt Romney blasted Perry In last night’s Republican Candidates, “ Debate Rick Perry doubled down on his outrageous far right wing statements about Social Security and Mitt Romney hit him hard on it. Are the Republicans really going to nominate a guy who calls Social Security a “ponzi scheme”?

And no Social Security is nothing at all like a “ponzi scheme”. The idea is absurd. Social Security has been working for Americans for over 70 years and it will be around for as long as we keep people like Rick Perry out of a position to destroy it.”

I know one thing for sure about the upcoming presidential election. I will not be voting for Rick Perry.
Ok, now on to better things like Honey Cake!

DATES

APRICOT PRESERVES

Honey Cake W/Fruit I (P, Tnt)
=============================
Source: Noreen Gilletz
Poster: Faygie
Serves: 12 to 16

1 stick margarine
3 eggs
2 teaspoons baking soda
3 cups flour
1 cup sugar
1 cup orange juice
1 cup honey
1/2 cup apricot jam
1 medium apple grated
1/2 cup each chopped nuts and chopped dates

Mix together in large mixer bowl the margarine and eggs. Add the baking soda, flour, sugar mixed together. Add the orange juice; mix on slow.

Add honey. Stir in jam, apple, nuts, and dates.

Bake in a lightly greased bundt pan at 350°F for 1 hour. Turn out of
pan immediately.

Faygie’s Notes: This is my holiday staple which includes apples and
honey for a sweet year. Norene Gilletz figured out the calorie content, but we decided that the cake was too good to worry about calories–once a year. Hope you enjoy it.

Nutritional Info Per Serving: 1/12 of cake: 265 calories, 35g
carbohydrate, 1g fibre and 13.3g fat, 35mg cholesterol; 1/16 of cake:
199 calories, 26g carbohydrate, 10g fat and 27mg cholesterol

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