YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 8

Posted on October 1, 2011. Filed under: Cakes, Dairy, Desserts, Ethnic Recipe, Jewish, Kosher Recipe, My Ramblings, Recipes, Rochester, Sour Cream, Yom Kippur | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |


YOM KIPPUR COUNTDOWN – DAY 8

Reflections

Figure 1 Winter Reflections by Josephine Wall

I hope everyone had a wonderful Rosh Hashanah! In reflecting on Yom Kippur I know it has always been the least favorite of my holidays. Why? Because I had to fast and I had to go to shul for a whole day and be bored and not at all where I wanted to be. My mind always wandered during services and until I was an adult I fled at sermon time. It wasn’t until Rabbi Shamai Kanter of Temple Beth El in Rochester, New York entered my life (I credit him with bringing me back to Judaism and giving me the knowledge that not all Rabbis are bad.) that I really listened to a sermon. But I had respect for him (and I had none for most of the Rabbis I had come into contact with in my lifetime). The first time I heard his sermon for Yom Kippur I couldn’t believe how cool this Rabbi was. He made me listen because his sermons always featured a movie he had seen. So year to year I would wonder what movie he would talk about this year and how would he tailor it to his theme. He never disappointed me! But, I mostly looked forward to going home, having a cigarette or two or lots more, and taking a nap before I would break my fast at 4:00 p.m. I would not fast any longer than that. And then, at 4:00 p.m. the holiday really began for me as I set up the trays and serving dishes with holiday delights so that my parents and their friends could have a pleasant break fast. I was very sad when my Mom decided that it wasn’t worth doing because no one every reciprocated and money was tight in our household. A few years later we would go over to the house of one of my parents new friends and join her wonderful break fasts.

When I got to college, I hosted my own break fasts if I couldn’t get home for the holidays. I was often the only Jew there, but I wanted to share my holidays with my friends. I continued this tradition when I got married. We would have a house-full of friends and family members and the attendees were 50% Jewish and & 50% Jewish. I would set out lots of goodies and everyone ate well. So, in remembering the pleasure I got from feeding everyone after fasting for however long they did, I don’t think I really minded Yom Kippur.

One of the themes of Yom Kippur is self-reflection. According to Wikipedia,

“Human self-reflection is the capacity of humans to exercise introspection and the willingness to learn more about their fundamental nature, purpose and essence. The earliest historical records demonstrate the great interest which humanity has had in itself. Human self-reflection invariably leads to inquiry into the human condition and the essence of humankind as a whole.”

I think that by keeping this blog, I do open myself to self-reflection. I try to be honest with myself and you, my readers. Therefore I sometimes open my eyes to things about myself I never really thought about or realized before. But, I didn’t realize that that was the role of Yom Kippur in the life of a Jew. I just assumed that it was all about self-denial and asking G-d to forgive us (as in me) for who knows what sins. Oh yes, I could enumerate on my sins while I was in temple. I could name them and ask forgiveness for them. But, they were not the deeper, most important truths and sins. I don’t think I ever really understood that it was only the sins against G-d that I was supposed to be asking for and via that mechanism, I might find a way to ask for forgiveness from fellow human beings whom I had wronged in one-way-or-another. It is very hard to ask for forgiveness, but we’ll cover that in another post. Now, as I am reading more, I am looking at Yom Kippur’s self-reflection in a different manner. I am looking at it as a journey to G-d and to me. I am going to begin a private journal for that purpose and I am going to look for just one way to make a difference in the world. Just one. If I can find that one thing, it is a start. I have decided that the one thing I will do this year is to do a volunteer project. I haven’t decided upon one yet, but this is something I just decided, so between now and the end of Yom Kippur, I will make a decision. I am not going to promise G-d this, just in case I fail in carrying this task out. I will not make a deal with G-d that “if you forgive me, I will do this,” as I don’t want to make light of his more important works. So, I will keep you abreast of my quest .

Now, for the big reveal of how I will commemorate this countdown, I have decided to include a sour cream cake recipe for each day of the Yom Kippur countdown and thought I would start the countdown recipes with this easy to make sour cream cake recipe:

We have the pan ready, now we need to pour the batter into it...

Sour Cream Bundt Cake
=====================
Submitted By: Sue Smith

Servings: 12

“This recipe is great for both yellow and chocolate flavored cakes! It makes a Light, fluffy, and SERIOUSLY moist cake.”

INGREDIENTS:

1 (18.25 ounce) package yellow cake mix
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup sour cream
1/8 cup confectioners’ sugar for dusting

DIRECTIONS:

Make the batter following the directions on the box, EXCEPT replace 2 teaspoons water with an equal amount of vanilla. Fold in sour cream.

Bake according to directions given for baking a Bundt cake. Cool on
rack, place on serving plate, and dust with confectioners’ sugar.

Nutrition Information Servings Per Recipe: 12

Calories: 234 Amount Per Serving Total Fat: 9g Cholesterol: 9mg Sodium: 293mg Amount Per Serving Total Carbs: 35.8g Dietary Fiber: 0.5g Protein: 2.5g

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